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Mar
4

7:00 pm
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Films of Bradford Young: "Mississippi Damned" International House, 3701 Chestnut Street

New Black Cinematography
Films of Bradford Young

Penn Humanities Forum in collaboration with Cinema Studies and International House Philadelphia

Mississippi Damned (Tina Mabry, 2009, 120 minutes)
Three sisters in a small, rural Mississippi town endure cycles of family dysfunction that include alcoholism, illness, and even murder.

Award-winning cinematographer Bradford Young is known for expressive lighting, bold colors, and nuanced representations of dark skin tones on screen. Part of an exciting new wave of independent African American filmmaking, Young uses his stunning visuals to tell stories of family, violence, and diaspora across black communities from New York City to rural Mississippi.



Mar
17

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
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Matthew L. Jockers A Computational Morphology of Plot Van Pelt Library, Meyerson Conference Center, 2nd floor

In this lecture, Jockers will describe a method he's developed for detecting and measuring plot structure in long-form fiction. He'll show how he uses this method, along with some basic machine clustering, to empirically identify six fundamental plot shapes within a collection of 45,000 novels. Jockers will conclude with a discussion of best sellers and the canon and show how the data from his model can be used to isolate the plot shapes that are most successful over time and across genre.

Pre-registration required. Please email us at saravarney@sas.upenn.edu with your name and academic affiliation.

About the Speaker
Matthew L. Jockers is associate professor of English at the University of Nebraska, faculty fellow in the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, faculty fellow in the Center for Great Plains Studies, and director of the Nebraska Literary Lab. His research is focused on computational approaches to the study of literature, especially large collections of literature. His books include Macroanalysis: Digital Methods and Literary History and Text Analysis Using R for Students of Literature. Jockers has written articles on computational text analysis, authorship attribution, Irish and Irish-American literature, and co-authored several important amicus briefs defending the fair and transformative use of digital text. His research has been profiled in the New York Times, Nature, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Nautilus, Wired, New Scientist, Smithsonian, on NBC News, and many others.



Mar
18

7:00 pm
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Films of Bradford Young: "Middle of Nowhere" and "The Door" International House, 3701 Chestnut Street

New Black Cinematography
Films of Bradford Young

Penn Humanities Forum in collaboration with cinema Studies and International House Philadelphia

Middle of Nowhere (Ava DuVernay, 2012, 97 minutes)
Medical student Ruby learns to live another life when her husband is imprisoned.

The Door (Ava DuVernay, 2013, 9 minutes)
Fifth in fashion brand Miu Miu's "Women's Tales" series, The Door follows five African American women whose strong bond helps one overcome a deep depression following divorce.

Award-winning cinematographer Bradford Young is known for expressive lighting, bold colors, and nuanced representations of dark skin tones on screen. Part of an exciting new wave of independent African American filmmaking, Young uses his stunning visuals to tell stories of family, violence, and diaspora across black communities from New York City to rural Mississippi.



Mar
19

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
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Sara Heller The Heterogeneous Effects of Summer Jobs The Jerry Lee Center, 3809 Walnut St.

CRIMINOLOGY COLLOQUIUM SERIES

Despite a growing consensus that employment programs require very high intensity and cost to improve outcomes among disadvantaged youth, a recent study found large decreases in violence from a relatively short, low-cost intervention: summer jobs. One hypothesis for the program’s success is that it targeted youth prior to school exit, acting as unemployment prevention rather than remediation. Yet with no out-of-school youth in the sample, the study could not test that hypothesis directly. This paper is a follow-up to that study, testing the prevention question directly by randomly assigning 5,228 in- and out-of-school disadvantaged male youth in Chicago to the same summer jobs program. Preliminary results will be presented.



Mar
27

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
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Evelyn Brodkin States of Inequality: Insights from Street-Level Research on the Welfare State The ARCH, Room 108, 3601 Locust Walk

SOCIAL SCIENCE AND POLICY FORUM

Drawing on her recent edited volume Work and the Welfare State, Brodkin discusses two developments affecting contemporary welfare state politics: the advance of workfare-style policies in an increasing number of countries and a distinct but related transnational project of governance reform that targets street-level organizations (SLOs). Evidence from international studies shows how, together, these initiatives are pushing back against the welfare state’s equalizing capacities and intensifying the precariousness of life for those at the economic margins.

While democratic welfare states arguably constitute one of the great developments of modern society, Brodkin’s work shows how, to varying degrees, they remain deeply contested, subject to changing economic and political conditions and demands. These contests occur on multiple levels, some of the most visible and well-observed occurring around legislative battles over social policy. Critically important, but less well-observed, are political contests that occur indirectly, taking place in the opaque spaces between formal policy provisions and the social outcomes that result, spaces in which the essential work of the welfare state takes place. It is in these spaces that SLOs play a crucial role in mediating inequality, both as shapers of policy and politics and as key points of interaction between the state and those who are disadvantaged, marginalized, or unemployed.



Mar
31

4:30 pm
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Alain Elkann Jewish Life in Europe and the United States Houston Hall, Bodek Lounge, 3417 Spruce Street

The Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program presents the 15th Annual Goldstone Forum

Alain Elkann is a prominent European novelist, intellectual, journalist, and interviewer. He has co-written books with the chief rabbi of Italy and the archbishop of Milan, and collaborated with a prominent member of the royal family of Jordan for a book on Islam. He is the president of the Egyptian Museum of Turin, a member of the award committee of the literary prize Premio Letterario Internazionale Mondello Palermo, and president of the Italian Foundation for Art and Culture (FIAC) of New York. His writings have been translated from Italian and English into Hebrew, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Turkish, and Japanese. The recipient of numerous awards, Elkann was inducted to the Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur, the highest award of France, in 2009.

You can read many of his interviews on his website: http://alainelkanninterviews.com.



May
8

9:00 am - 5:00 pm
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Citizens, Constitutions, and Democracy in Post-Neoliberal Latin America Irvine Auditorium

As the culmination of our year-long examination of the transformations sweeping through Latin America, international scholars gather to discuss the implications for democracy, stable governance and popular wellbeing in the region. 

Panels include:

Post-Liberal Democracy
George Ciccariello-Maher (Drexel University Dept. of History and Politics)
Philippe Schmitter (European University Institute, Political and Social Sciences)

Courts and Constitutional Changes
Sandra Botero (University of Notre Dame Dept. of Political Science)
Roberto Gargarella (University Torcuato Di Tella Law School)

Race and Ethnic Identities
Juliet Hooker (University of Texas at Austin Dept. of Government)
Nancy Postero (UC-San Diego Dept. of Anthropology)

Citizenship and New forms of Participation
Thamy Pogrebinschi (WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Democracy and Democratization Research Unit)
Gisela Zaremberg (FLACSO México)