URBS220 - WORLD POST-1800: BF SEM

Course Description: 
In the years since the 1965 repeal of nationality based quotas, immigration to the United States has surged. Not only has the number of immigrants reached record highs, they have come from different places. During the last great wave of immigration in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, immigrants came largely from southern and eastern Europe. Today, they come primarily from Latin America and Asia. Formerly, they usually settled in cities, moving outward as their prosperity increased; today, many bypass cities, heading straight for suburbs where a majority of immigrants now live. They are reviving moribund city economies and providing essential labor for service industries, construction, landscaping, and some manufacturing as well as well as for some professions and high tech jobs. Yet, new immigration has resulted in massive expenditures on border control, huge increases in deportation, and a fierce national political debate about the impact of immigration and immigration reform. Debates about immigration frequently rest, either implicitly or explicitly on assumptions about the history of immigration and immigration policy. These assumptions frequently are incorrect - with major implications for public understanding and public policy. There are few public issues in which history matters as much as it does for immigration. This seminar will provide the historical background essential for framing discussions of immigration today. It will consider the origins, demography, and geography of immigration and will pay special attention to the history of immigration policy. Requirements include reading approximately one book per week, writing several short commentary papers on readings, and leading workshops on the primary sources for the study of immigr ation history.
Course ID: 
URBS220
Title (text only): 
WORLD POST-1800: BF SEM
Term: 
2018C
Term Session: 
0
Subject Area: 
URBS
Status: 
O