Every week the Center for Ancient Studies sends a list of events related to the ancient world in the Philadelphia area to interested members.

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Vulnerability in the Middle Ages
Friday, 28 April 2017
9:30 AM
Aaron Burr Hall Room 219, Princeton University
Graduate Student Conference in Medieval Studies https://medievalstudies.princeton.edu/event/spring-graduate-medieval-conference/
Sponsored by: Department of Medieval Studies, Princeton


The Core of a New Age: Northern Mesopotamia and Syria in the Late Bronze Age
Friday, 28 April 2017
9:30 AM
ISAW ISAW Lecture Hall, NYC
During the Late Bronze Age Northern Mesopotamia consists of two major regions that highly differ in political trajectories: East of the Euphrates, two major powers grew prominent, one after the other, and became major players in what is known as the Age of Diplomacy: one is the kingdom of Mitanni, the other is Assyria. West of the Euphrates, instead, we see a fragmented political landscape with local kingdoms wavering between the major powers. The two regions, however, strongly interacted from early times in history; with the Late Bronze Age, the expansion of the kingdom of Mitanni and of Assyria to the West promoted and intensified the interaction between local interests and external hegemonic pursuits in the administrative, political, cultural, and economic spheres. The workshop aims at reflecting on the conceptualization, organization, and cultural expressions of power, as well as circulations of people, goods, and knowledge in Northern Mesopotamia and Syria. The central question to be explored is how and in which contexts we can observe some kind of common ideology reflecting the multiple intersections of political, economic, and social frameworks of the Club of the Great Powers. Simultaneously, the focus will be on the peculiarities of the local dynamics shaping the relations East and West of the Euphrates during the Late Bronze Age. Schedule: http://isaw.nyu.edu/events/core-of-a-new-age Registration is required at isaw.nyu.edu/rsvp
Sponsored by: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World


Suicide in the Hebrew Bible and the Ancient Near East
Friday, 28 April 2017
11:00 AM
Jan Dietrich, Aarhus University
Italian Academy 5th Floor Conference Room, Columbia University
Suicide raises questions about the meaning and purpose of human life, and the different ways society deals with it are currently being debated not only in society but in different fields of research as well. However, an extensive study of suicide in ancient Israel and its neighbouring cultures of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia has been missing, and it is the aim of the book presented to close this research gap. In my paper, building upon my book, I do not view suicide from medical or dogmatic-theological perspectives, which regard suicide as an act of mental illness or sinful deed. Instead, it is viewed from a historico-cultural and sociological perspective and focuses on the motives and meanings behind suicidal acts. By examining suicidal act from this angle, they are interpreted as attempts to solve basic problems of life, and the historical material available is categorised into three basic forms: escapist suicides, aggressive suicides, and suicides of passage and sacrifice.
Sponsored by: Center for the Ancient Mediterranean, Columbia


Contact, Colony, and Community in the Black Sea Region: The First Two Seasons of Excavations at the Kale of Sinop, Turkey
Friday, 28 April 2017
4:30 PM
Alexander Bauer, Queens College, CUNY
Rhys Carpenter Library Room B21, Bryn Mawr College
Sponsored by: Department of Greek, Latin and Classical Studies, Bryn Mawr College


Race: An Anthropological Interrogation
Monday, 1 May 2017
10:30 AM
Penn Museum Room 345, University of Pennsylvania
Colloquium Conference 10:30 AM Stuck in Black and White: Media as a Technology of Racial (De)Construction (Ana Almeyda-Cohen, Leniqueca Welcome, Sarah Carson 11:30 AM The Privilege to Make Race (Justin Reamer, Rachael Stephens, Akshay Walia) 12:30 Lunch and Mediating Race (Nooshin Sadeghsamimi, Rachael Stephens/Tali Ziv, Josh Franklin) 1:30 PM Letters, Languages, Histories: Race in Colonial Contexts (Kristina Nielson, Andrea LLoyd, Sara Rendell) 2:30 PM Race on Display: Reclamations, Translations, Limitations (Lise Puyo, Lizzy Oakely, Katy Schaeffer) 3:30 PM “Native Voices” Exhibition Tour with Lise Puyo
Sponsored by: Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania


Augustus’ religion in the mirror of Ovid’s Fasti: The Case of Concordia Augusta
Tuesday, 2 May 2017
4:30 PM
Darja Šterbenc Erker, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin
East Pyne Room 161, Princeton University
Sponsored by: Department of Classics at Princeton University


A Paradise in the Caucasus: An Achaemenid Residence in Azerbaijan
Tuesday, 2 May 2017
6:00 PM
Florian Knauss, Staatliche Antikensammlungen und Glyptothek, München
ISAW ISAW Lecture Hall, NYC
Contrary to its immense historical impact on the cultures of the Ancient Near East and the Eastern Mediterranean, the Achaemenid Empire has been difficult to grasp archaeologically outside its centres, the impressive monumental complexes of Persepolis, Susa and Pasargadae. This is particularly surprising given the historic and epigraphic evidence for the existence of a very tight‐knit, efficiently organized administration. During the past 20 years, excavations led to new archaeological discoveries that have changed this picture. In a peripheral corner of the empire, the Southern Caucasus, administrative complexes were found which bear all hallmarks of ‘Iranian Achaemenid’ monumental architecture, from building standards to the physical organization of the landscape. This suggests that the Achaemenids did create and export within their realm a fundamentally new way of representing rulership, by managing space on an unprecedented scale and creating new imperial landscapes. Their ‘paradises’ were at the same time luxurious residences with spacious gardens and administrative centres, playing an important role for the control of the dependent territories.
Sponsored by: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World


Hidden in Plain Sight: Three Attic Vases from the Century Association in New York
Thursday, 4 May 2017
6:00 PM
Jennifer Udell, Fordham Museum of Greek, Etruscan and Roman Art
ISAW ISAW Lecture Hall, NYC
At the end of the 19th century Thomas B. Clarke donated four ancient Greek vases to the venerable Century Association, a private club founded by members of the Hudson River School. This talk serves as a public debut for three of the vases —one black-figure and two red-figure—which have been all but lost to the scholarly and academic community since they entered the club's collection in 1891. I address briefly the phenomenon of private New York social clubs and their impressive art collections before turning to the iconography and the style of the vases themselves.
Sponsored by: AIA, NYC Chapter


When Museums Tackle Tough Topics: Race, Science, and the Penn Museum
Thursday, 4 May 2017
6:30 PM
Penn Museum , University of Pennsylvania
Can Museums be instruments of social change? This past fall, the Penn Museum brought together more than two dozen internationally recognized experts from diverse backgrounds for a series of free programs, The Public Classroom @ Penn Museum: Science and Race: History, Use and Abuse, an in-depth and powerful exploration about race, science, and social justice. Join us Thursday evening, May 4, as we discuss the process of creating this program and reflect on what went right, what were the challenges, and what we learned. See short videos of each class, hear from some of the experts themselves, and find out how you can use the resources created in this program as it moves from the Museum into the community. Hear from panelists John L. Jackson, Jr., Richard Perry University Professor and Dean of the School of Social Policy and Practice; Janet Monge, Curator-in-Charge, Physical Anthropology Section, Penn Museum, and Adjunct Professor of Anthropology; and Arjun Shankar, Post Doctoral Fellow, School of Social Policy and Practice. Kate Quinn, Director of Exhibitions and Public Programs, Penn Museum, moderates the discussion.
Sponsored by: Penn Museum


Comparing Greek and Near Eastern slavery in the post-Finley era
Friday, 5 May 2017
12:00 PM
David Lewis, The University of Nottingham
Scheide Caldwell House Room 209, Princeton University
Sponsored by: Program in the Ancient World, Princeton, Department of Classics at Princeton University


CARPE Dirt, Disease, and Detritus: Sanitation in Roman Italy
Friday, 5 May 2017
5:30 PM
Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow, Brandeis University
Hunter West Building Room 615, Hunter College, CUNY
The 80th Annual Josephine P. Earle Memorial Lecture Pre-lecture reception 4:30-5:00 Award ceremony 5:00-5:30 Lecture 5:30-6:30 Post-lecture reception 6:30-7:00
Sponsored by: Classics Division of the Department of Classics and Oriental Studies, Hunter College


Book Reading: A History of Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Middle East
Friday, 5 May 2017
6:00 PM
Heather Sharkey, University of Pennsylvania
34th and Sansom Penn Book Center,
This book examines relations between Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Ottoman Middle East before World War I, describing how religion influenced state policies and popular attitudes, and how people mingled in daily life.
Sponsored by: Penn Book Center


Subjects of Empire: Political and Cultural Exchange in Imperial Rome. A Conference in Honor of Brent Shaw
Friday, 12 May 2017
1:00 PM
Aaron Burr Hall Room 219, Princeton University
Schedule: http://www.princeton.edu/classics/conference-in-honor-of-brent-shaw/ May 12: 1–6:30 May 13: 8:45–6:30
Sponsored by: Department of Classics at Princeton University