Every week the Center for Ancient Studies sends a list of events related to the ancient world in the Philadelphia area to interested members.

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Animals at Sitio Conte: Beneath the Surface and the Living World All Around
Sunday, 12 April 2015
1:00 PM
Katherine Moore, Penn Museum
Penn Museum , University of Pennsylvania
The human burials at Sitio Conte were found with the remains of many different kinds of animals, from whales and sharks to birds and rodents. Most of these animal parts were fastened to jewelry and clothing, including the teeth of more than 70 dogs sewn to one belt. The fabulous gold plaques and pottery are also covered with images of fierce and powerful animals, but different animals than the ones used to make things or to eat. Dr. Katherine Moore, Zooarchaeologist and Mainwaring Teaching Specialist, considers the evidence to answer some questions: What animals lived around the site? How did people use animals in their daily lives? What supernatural features of animals can we see in their art? Free with Museum admission.


The Rise of the Qin Empire and the End of Historiography in Early China
Tuesday, 14 April 2015
6:00 PM
Vincent Leung, ISAW
ISAW 2nd Floor Lecture Hall , 15 East 84th St. New York, NY
NOTICE: Admission to the ISAW Lecture Hall closes 10 minutes after the scheduled start time --Reception to follow The Qin empire (221-206 BCE) is the shortest dynasty in all of Chinese history but yet, its legacy is extraordinarily complex and immense. Internationally, it is perhaps best known for its underground terracotta army, still quietly standing guard in the mausoleum of the First Emperor after more than two thousand years. In this presentation, I will explore a more obscure, but no less remarkable, legacy of the Qin empire. It is a legacy not in the realm of material objects, like the terracotta warriors, but in political thought. I will discuss the curiously antagonistic relationship that the Qin saw between empire building and the writing of history and why, for the Qin, a good empire is one that is entirely forgetful of its past and obviates the need for all historical writings in the future. As I will argue, it is a truly astonishing vision of the creation of empire as the end of historiography, and indeed, the end of all history.


Messy Vitality: Designing Architecture and Urbanism in Roman Africa
Wednesday, 15 April 2015
12:30 PM
Thomas Morton, Swarthmore College
Thomas Library 224, Bryn Mawr College
One might ask, how does the study of large-scale public buildings contribute to the new discussions regarding the diversified material culture of the heterogeneous populations of the Roman provinces? The case studies presented in this lecture indicate that while there are certainly commonalities in building types and forms, the evidence suggests that there was a clear intentionality to create site-specific monumental public architecture in Africa Proconsularis that responded to the various conditions of each place.


Toleration Within Judaism in the Roman Empire
Wednesday, 15 April 2015
4:30 PM
Martin Goodman, Oxford University
McCormick Hall 106, Princeton University


HYDE LECTURE: Conserving the Parthenon: Temple, Church, Mosque, Ruin, Photo Op?
Wednesday, 15 April 2015
5:00 PM
Margie Miles, UC Irvine
Cohen Hall 402, University of Pennsylvania
Teams of architects, conservators and stonemasons have been dismantling and reconstructing the Parthenon since the 1980s. The work is very careful, and has led to some exciting new discoveries about the original temple. Many historical and ethical issues also arise from such efforts: to what period should the temple be restored, and how much of it should be restored? Original construction began in the 450s BCE, but there have been several “Parthenons” since then, serving different purposes. For what audience and purpose should the new interventions be directed? How much of it should be rebuilt in new marble?


HYDE LECTURE COLLOQUIUM: Transferred Temples and the Augustan Renewal in Athens
Thursday, 16 April 2015
4:30 PM
Margie Miles, UC Irvine
Cohen Hall 402, University of Pennsylvania
Soon after Actium, Augustus required populations (and cults) to be uprooted and moved to create Nikopolis and a greater Patras. In Athens, still trying to recover from the devastating siege of Sulla, a period of architectural renewal was begun, reflected in the importation of several 5th century BCE temples and one double stoa from the Attic countryside into central Athens. New construction was sponsored as well, and at least one temple in the countryside was rebuilt and rededicated. This paper presents the latest evidence for these transfers, and discusses the implications of this classicizing building program for the political realities in Augustan Athens.
Sponsored by: Center for Ancient Studies, Classics Department, University of Pennsylvania


More than a Matter of Style: The Diyala Expedition and its Impact on Mesopotamian Archaeology
Thursday, 16 April 2015
6:00 PM
Clemens Reichel, University of Toronto
ISAW 2nd Floor Lecture Hall , 15 East 84th St. New York, NY
RSVP Required: http://isaw.nyu.edu/events/q NOTICE: Admission to the ISAW Lecture Hall closes 5 minutes prior to the scheduled start time. --Reception to follow.


PSCO: Hermann Cohen (1842-1918) and Julius Wellhausen (1844-1918) on Prophets and Sacrifice
Thursday, 16 April 2015
7:00 PM
Alisha Pomazon, St. Thomas More
Cohen Hall Second Floor Lounge, University of Pennsylvania
All are welcome! As usual, those interested are also welcome to join us for an informal dinner prior to the session. Those wishing to dine together before the seminar will meet at 6:00 p.m. in the Second-Floor Lounge of Cohen Hall and then walk next door to the food court in Houston Hall. Or, just meet us in the Houston Hall downstairs food-court between 6:00-6:45 p.m. As usual, the PSCO seminar will begin at 7:00 p.m. and end at 9:00 p.m. We meet in the Second-Floor Lounge of Cohen Hall.


Pain and Pleasure in Classical Antiquity
Friday, 17 April 2015
Various Locations, Columbia University
Co-organized by William Harris (wvh1@columbia.edu) and Ursula M. Poole (ump2102@columbia.edu). A program of speakers can be found here: http://centerfortheancientmediterranean.org/sites/default/files/conferenceprogram/Final%20Program%20-%20Pain%20%26%20Pleasure%202015.pdf


A New Look: Sinai and Its Icons in Light of the Digitization of the Weitzmann Archive
Friday, 17 April 2015
McCormick Hall 101, Princeton University
The icons at the Monastery of Saint Catherine at Mount Sinai will be the focus of a two-day conference, “A New Look: Sinai and Its Icons in Light of the Digitization of the Weitzmann Archive,” that is being organized by the Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University, and will take place at Princeton on April 17–18, 2015. The Department of Art and Archaeology is completing a major initiative to digitize and catalogue a key archive for the study of Byzantine icons—several thousand color images of the icons owned by the Monastery of Saint Catherine at Mount Sinai. The oldest continuously inhabited Christian monastery in the world, with a history that can be traced back over seventeen centuries, Saint Catherine’s possesses an extraordinary collection of icons that date from Late Antiquity to the modern era, illustrating the history of the icon and including many of the most important surviving pre-Iconoclastic panel icons. Kurt Weitzmann, who codirected expeditions to the monastery between 1956 and 1965, had intended that these materials would be published in a series of volumes. Unfortunately, only the first of these (Kurt Weitzmann, The Monastery of Saint Catherine at Mount Sinai: The Icons. Volume One: From the Sixth to the Tenth Century. Princeton: Princeton University press, 1976) was ever published. The Department of Art and Archaeology’s archive of color images of the icons taken by the expeditions to Sinai is now being digitized and will be made available for study. The project was funded by a generous grant from Princeton’s David A. Gardner ’69 Magic Project. The annual Weitzmann Lecture will be given on the evening of Friday, April 17, by Professor Robin Cormack, Courtauld Institute of Art, emeritus. http://www.princeton.edu/visualresources/sinai-and-its-icons/


Life at the Margins: Questions in Ancient Near Eastern Social History
Friday, 17 April 2015
10:00 AM
ISAW 2nd Floor Lecture Hall , 15 East 84th St. New York, NY
Space is limited: RSVP required: http://isaw.nyu.edu/events/life-at-margins Open to the public. The history of the ancient Near East is frequently presented as a long sequence of kings and conquests, obscuring the lives of slaves, women, children, and a host of other social groups. Narratives of this kind conceal the breadth of possible social relationships and configurations, as well as de-emphasize other themes and motifs in ancient Near Eastern social history. To arrive at a more nuanced picture of life in the ancient Near East, this workshop investigates questions that tend to fall outside of the usual focus on elites interacting with other elites, drawing attention instead to the lives of marginalized social groups, to broader social issues, and to the problem of politics disentangled from kings. Program 10:00am - Nicholas Reid (ISAW) POW: Revisiting Prisoners of War in Early Mesopotamia 11:15am - Jonathan Tenney (Cornell University) Care and Control of the Babylonian Underclass 12:00pm - Dan Fleming (New York University) Ancient Near Eastern History De-centered: The Case of Emar 2:00pm - Jonathan Valk (ISAW) “They Enjoy Syrup and Ghee at Tables of Silver and Gold”: Infant Loss in Ancient Mesopotamia 2:45pm - Cornelia Wunsch (SOAS, University of London) Women of Inferior Status: Injunctions to Prevent Men from Having Contact with Them 4:00pm - Seth Richardson (University of Chicago) “I am Living in a City of Hunger”: Towards a Hermeneutics of Poverty in Mesopotamia


(De)constructing politeia: Reflections on Citizenship and the Bestowal of Privileges upon Foreigners in Hellenistic Democracies
Friday, 17 April 2015
11:00 AM
Christel Müller, University of Paris
Scheide Caldwell House 209, Princeton University
Please RSVP to rdexter@princeton.edu


Excavations in Tarsus-Gözlükule, Cilicia: Past and Present
Friday, 17 April 2015
4:30 PM
Aslı Özyar, Bogazici University
Carpenter Library B21, Bryn Mawr College


Making Sense of the Corpus Hermeticum: Text – Context – Reception
Monday, 20 April 2015
4:45 PM
Christian Wildberg, Princeton University
Silver Center for Arts and Science 503, New York University
Contact: Christopher Parmenter csp351@nyu.edu


The Mythic Traditions in Biology
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
4:30 PM
Scott Gilbert, Swarthmore College
Trotter Hall 301, Swarthmore College


Peoples and Places in Pre-Islamic Afghanistan: The Evidence of the Bactrian Documents
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
6:00 PM
Nicholas Sims-Williams, University of London
ISAW 2nd Floor Lecture Hall , 15 East 84th St. New York, NY
NOTICE: Admission to the ISAW Lecture Hall closes 10 minutes after the scheduled start time --Reception to follow During the last 25 years, more than 150 documents in Bactrian, the principal administrative language of pre-Islamic Afghanistan, have come to light. In addition to revealing a previously almost unknown language of the Iranian family written in a variety of cursive Greek script, the decipherment of this substantial body of material promises to illuminate the political and social history of the region over a period of nearly half a millennium, from the early 4th to the late 8th century C.E. During this time, what is now northern Afghanistan came under the domination of a succession of rulers including the Sasanian dynasty of Iran, the nomadic Hephthalites, the Western Turks, and finally the Muslim Arabs and their allies. This lecture will survey the documents’ references to peoples and places, showing how these may be combined with evidence from coins and literary sources in order to contribute to our knowledge of this crucial period in the history of Afghanistan. In conclusion, the speaker will present an unpublished Bactrian contract, which contains many unusual features and probably originates from a region further south than any of the documents so far made known. Nicholas Sims-Williams studied Iranian languages, Sanskrit and Syriac at Cambridge, receiving his PhD for a thesis on a miscellany of Christian texts translated from Syriac into Sogdian. In 1976 he joined the staff of SOAS, University of London, where he became Research Professor of Iranian and Central Asian Studies in 2004. His research focuses on Bactrian, Sogdian and other Middle Iranian languages of Afghanistan and Central Asia, and on the documents and Manichaean and Christian literature written in those languages. Recent publications include Bactrian documents from Northern Afghanistan (3 volumes, 2001–2012) and Biblical and other Christian Sogdian texts from the Turfan collection (2014). Current projects include a study of the chronology of the Bactrian documents and a trilingual (Sogdian–Syriac–English) dictionary to the Christian literature in Sogdian.


How Did She Get that Hair? The Symbolism and Significance of the Hairstyles Worn by Roman Empresses
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
6:15 PM
Lee Ann Ricardi, College of New Jersey
Penn Museum , University of Pennsylvania


When Big Data Slows Down: Digital Humanities and the Study of Roman Amphitheaters
Tuesday, 21 April 2015
6:30 PM
Sebastian Heath, NYU
Bobst Library 5th Floor Research Commons, New York University
This lecture is free and open to the public, but an RSVP is required. To RSVP: http://ancientstudies.fas.nyu.edu/page/events For more information email Laurie Murphy: laurie.murphy@nyu.edu


El Caño: Excavations of an Elite Precolumbian Cemetery in Panama
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
6:00 PM
Julia Mayo, Fundación El Caño
Penn Museum , University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Julia Mayo, President of the Fundación El Caño, and Director of the archaeological project at El Caño in Panama, speaks on work at the site and exciting recent research about the Coclé Culture. Situated two miles from the famous site of Sitio Conte, El Caño is known for its unique stone sculptural style and stone structures. Recently, archaeologists there excavated four lavish burials, ca. 700 to 1000 CE, broadly contemporary with similar burials at Sitio Conte—where the first archaeological evidence for the sumptuous wealth of Panamanian chiefdoms was unearthed more than 80 years ago. The new finds at El Caño, and similarities between the two sites, tell a richer story about ancient funerary practices and patterns in Central America.


Pragmatic or pure? Two experiments in editing
Thursday, 23 April 2015
4:30 PM
Cynthia Damon, University of Pennsylvania
Cohen Hall 402, University of Pennsylvania
This talk is a report from the field on two experiments in editing conducted with recent classes at Penn. The first took a pragmatic approach and produced a mockup of a variorum edition of (some of) Tacitus' Annals; this was part of a graduate seminar. The second, which involved an undergraduate research assistant, a class of Postbacs, and graduate students in LATN 540, adopted a purist approach and produced a text and apparatus for (some of) the Bellum Alexandrinum, a work by an unknown author preserved in the corpus of Caesar's Bella. The pros and cons of each method will be weighed. I will conclude with some reflections on involving students in textual criticism.


Reading the ‘Citizenship Papyrus’ (P.Giss. I 40)
Friday, 24 April 2015
11:30 AM
Ari Bryen, Institute for Advanced Study
Scheide Caldwell House 209, Princeton University


Human Sacrifice in Etruscan Art and Reality
Friday, 24 April 2015
12:00 PM
Larissa Bonfante, New York University
Penn Museum Classroom 2, University of Pennsylvania


Livy XXI: Historical Aims and Methods
Friday, 24 April 2015
4:30 PM
Joseph Solodow, Yale University
Carpenter Library B21, Bryn Mawr College


At the Gates of the Temple: Culture, Politics and Place in Ptolemaic Egypt
Monday, 27 April 2015
4:45 PM
Ian Moyer, University of Michigan
Silver Center for Arts and Science 503, New York University
Contact: Christopher Parmenter csp351@nyu.edu


Tenth Annual Kolb Spring Junior Fellows Colloquium
Thursday, 30 April 2015
2:00 PM
Penn Museum Classroom 2, University of Pennsylvania
Darren Ashby (NELC) Feeding the Gods: The Material Remains of the ED III Bagara Temple Complex at Tell al-Hiba, ancient Lagash Jordan Pickett (AAMW) Water in Late Antique Ephesus: Temples, Churches, Cisterns And Pipes Jose Maria Lopez Bejarano (Anthropology) Recreating a Myth and Shaping a Sacred Landscape: Inca Ritual Centers along the Pilgrimage Route in the Peninsula of Copacabana, Bolivia Jamie Sanecki (History of Art) St. Martin and the Beggar at the Cathedral of Lucca: From Episcopal to Civic Symbol