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Time: 2pm 
Location: 2N36
Title: TBA

Time: 2pm 
Location: 2N36
Title: TBA

Time: 2pm
Location: 2N36
Title: TBA

Time: 2pm
Location: 2N36
Title: Entanglement growth in quantum quenches

Abstract: A global quench is an interesting setting where we can study thermalization of subsystems in a pure state. We investigate the spread of entanglement following a global quench in free field theory, holography, spin chains, and toy models. We find that the results in free scalar field theory are exactly reproduced by the model of free streaming quasiparticles, but strongly interacting chaotic systems spread entanglement more effectively. Based on recent insight into many-body quantum chaos, we propose two inequalities on the entropy, and suggest that the true evolution of the entropy is well approximated by saturating the combined bounds. A model based on the chaotic growth of operators saturates the combined bounds, and is a promising candidate to replace the quasiparticle model for chaotic systems.

Time: 2pm
Location: 2N36
 
Title: AdS_2 holography and non-extremal black holes

Abstract: I will present aspects of AdS_2 holography for a specific Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton model that is obtained by Kaluza-Klein reduction from pure AdS_3 gravity with negative cosmological constant. In particular, I will derive the one-dimensional holographic dual for both running and constant dilaton solutions, and I will discuss the connection with the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model. Finally, I will explain how this dilaton gravity model provides a holographic description for four-dimensional asymptotically conformally AdS_2 x S^2 non-extremal black holes.   The talk is based on the recent paper https://arxiv.org/abs/1608.07018.

Time: 2pm
Location: 2N36
Title: Entanglement, Holography and Causal Diamonds

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
 
Title: Tunneling in Quantum Field Theory and the Fate of the Universe
 
Abstract:
One of the most concrete implications of the discovery of the Higgs
boson is that, in the absence of physics beyond the standard model, the
long term fate of our universe can now be established through precision
calculations. Are we in a metastable minimum of the Higgs potential or
the true minimum? If we are in a metastable vacuum, what is its
lifetime? To answer these questions, we need to understand tunneling in
quantum field theory. As we delve into how tunneling works, we find many
unusual elements: complex quantities which should be real,
gauge-dependent quantities which should be physical, an hbar expansion
which differs from the ordinary loop expansion, and ultraviolet degrees
of freedom that don't decouple. This talk will discuss some of these
elements and present some new perspectives on quantum tunneling.

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
 
 
Title: "Bad Compactifications"

Abstract:

The parameter space of string compactifications contains a locus of
"bad" theories. These theories are physically the most interesting in
many ways. We analyze the bad locus of theories at various levels ---
where it is, it's multiplicity, and finally, we "categorify" it.
This is all done in the context of abelian gauged linear sigma models.

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
 
Title: Scrambling of locally perturbed thermal states
 
Abstract:
I will discuss the calculation of mutual information in 2d CFTs in the large c limit to determine the scrambling time scale at which it becomes small. Time permitting, I will make some remarks on the comparison between this approach and the calculation of out of time order correlators at finite temperature.

Place: DRL 4N12  
Thursday, April 7:

10:30-11am: Welcome coffee

11am -12:30pm: Rob Myers (Perimeter)
Title: Scanning New Horizons: Information, Holography & Gravity

12:30pm-2pm: Catered lunch (in 4N12)

2-3:30pm: Matt Headrick (Brandeis)
Title: A new perspective on holographic entanglement

3:30-4pm: Coffee

4-5:30pm: Daniel Roberts (MIT)
Title: Chaos in quantum channels

6:30pm: Conference dinner at Han Dynasty

Friday, April 8:

10:30-11am: Welcome coffee

11am -12:30pm: Herman Verlinde (Princeton)
Title: 

12:30pm-1pm: Catered lunch (in 4N12)

1-2:30pm: Jan de Boer (Amsterdam) 
Title: Entanglement Holography

3:30-4pm: Coffee

4-5:30pm:  Bartek Czech (Stanford)
Title: A stereoscopic look into the bulk

End of the workshop

Time: 3:30pm
Place: 4N12
 
Title: Strings, Exotics, and the 750 GeV Diphoton Excess
 
Abstract:

I first give a general review of the experimental, phenomenological, and theoretical status of
the possible diphoton excess at 750 GeV reported by  CMS and ATLAS. I then describe work done in collaboration with Mirjam Cvetic and Jim Halverson (hep-ph/1512.07622 and 1602.06257) attempting to explain the excess in terms of the types of  scalar particles and exotic vectorlike particles expected in a class of superstring constructions, taking into account experimental limits, expected Yukawa couplings, and perturbativity up to a large string scale.

 
 

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
 
Title: Effective field theory of dissipative fluids

Time: 2pm
Place:2N36
 
Title: Cross-Order Relations from Maximal Unitarity

Abstract:
I will devote the first part of the talk to a review of thegeneralized unitarity method for loop calculations, and of the originsof dual conformal invariance of amplitudes in planar N=4supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.  In the second half, I willdiscuss the use of maximal unitarity at two loops to reconstruct theABDK relation between one- and two-loop amplitudes in N=4supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.
 
 

The purpose of this meeting is to bring together experts working at the interface of cosmology, string theory and particle physics for a few days of informal talks and exchanges of ideas. The schedule will allow ample time for impromptu discussions and collaborations. Each talk includes ~60mins worth of presentation and interruptions, plus 30mins worth of questions/discussions.

Place: DRL 4N12  

Thursday, December 3:

10:30-11am: Welcome coffee

11am -12:30pm: Juan Maldacena (IAS)
Title: "Quantum mechanics and Cosmology:  Entanglement and interference effects”

12:30pm-2pm: Catered lunch (in 4N12)

2-3:30pm: Erik Verlinde (Amsterdam)
Title: “Emergent Gravity and the Dark Universe”

3:30-4pm: Coffee

4-5:30pm: Liam McAllister (Cornell)
Title: "Planckian Axions and Quantum Gravity"

6:30pm: Conference dinner at Han Dynasty

Friday, December 4:

10:30-11am: Welcome coffee

11am -12:30pm: Gregory Gabadadze (NYU)
Title: "Metamorphosis of the Cosmological Constant"

12:30pm-2pm: Catered lunch (in 4N12)

2-3:30pm: Savdeep Sethi (Chicago)
Title: “Bounding the String Landscape”

3:30-4pm: Coffee

4-5:30pm:  Mariangela Lisanti (Princeton)
Title: "Searching for Signals of Dark Matter in the Inner Galaxy"

End of the workshop

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
 
Title: F-Theorem and the Epsilon Expansion
Abstract:
I will discuss the dimensional continuation of the sphere free energy in conformal field theory. This provides an interpolation between a-anomaly coefficients in even dimensions and F-values in odd dimensions, and smoothly connects the existing a-theorems and F-theorems. As concrete applications, I will explain how to use the Wilson-Fisher epsilon expansion to find the value of F for the 3d Ising CFT and related O(N) symmetric models, and for the conformal phase of the 3d QED with N_f massless fermions.  

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
 
Title: Witten Diagrams Revisited: The AdS Geometry of Conformal Blocks

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
 
Title: Matter Transitions and Heterotic/F-theory duality

Abstract:

We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D Heterotic/F-theory dual pairs, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6), SU(7), and SU(8) gauge groups, where matter in a three-index antisymmetric
representation is exchanged in the transition for matter in a
two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are
realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition
point. We also briefly describe some other situations,
with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter
transitions can occur between different representations.  For SU(3),
in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and
matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass
model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation
that complements other recent analogous constructions.  

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
Title: The Future is Stochastic
Abstract: Precision calculations in de Sitter space (such as of inflationary predictions for primordial fluctuations) are often plagued by infrared problems and issues of secular time dependence. Similar issues about the breakdown of perturbation theory also arise for information loss in black holes. This talk briefly summarizes what is known about when these problems do (and do not) arise, and how similar problems are dealt with in other areas (like optics). It is argued that Master-Equation techniques used there also apply to cosmology (and possibly black holes) and can tell us how to extract reliably late-time predictions. Applied to inflation they lead to Starobinsky's stochastic methods (plus potential corrections). This is argued to provide an explanation for why stochastic inflation seems to resum IR effects in simple examples, and allows these tools to be generalized to other systems. I mention in passing the relevance of these tools to the problem of Schrodinger's Cosmologist! : how primordial fluctuations decohere sometime between their production during inflation and their observation early in the present Big Bang Epoch.

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
Title: "Effective string theory for vortex lines in fluids and superfluids"

Time: 2pm
Place: 2N36
Title: “Thriving from the vacuum”
Abstract: Theories of modified gravity in the infrared usually come hand in hand with additional degrees of freedom which couple to matter at gravitational strength and carry a low strong-coupling scale. By including non-trivial effects from the vacuum I will show how the strong-coupling scale can be raised while keeping the theory fundamentally Lorentz-invariant. This can lead to new features and may alleviate the need for a screening mechanism.