AAMW425 - LATE ANTIQUE ARTS

What is 'Late Antiquity'? In 312 when Roman emperor Constantine inaugurated a Christian empire, 'Roman' culture was centuries old. The period ca. 200-650 CE saw profound transformations that launched Medieval, Byzantine and Islamic traditions. In this epoch of economic and political upheaval destruction was frequent but partial: Rome long survived, Constantine's 'new Rome,' Constantinople flourished, and around the Empire both proto-global visual culture and local forms prospered. Roman cultural models authorized both innovation and passion for tradition, in forms and styles: we critique art-historical models for Late Antique 'decline', analyse habits of material reuse and curation, and look at new Christian and Jewish roles for Roman things as well as polytheist visual survival. Foreign allies and enemies, and new peoples invading an already polyethnic Empire, interacted with Greco-Roman Late Antiquity: we visit arts of Sasanian and Islamic empires east and south, and 'barbarian' domains in Africa, Europe, Britain. Media discussed, for sacred, courtly, domestic, funerary, political and civic spaces and structures include not just 'monumental' painting, mosaic, sculpture, but also objects of silver, ceramic, ivory, figural textile, glass; painted books; jewelry; mass-media artifacts like coins and pilgrimage tokens. We also study Late Antique texts on art, objects, space and viewership.
Section 401 - LEC - LATE ANTIQUE ARTS
TR 0600PM-0730PM
KUTTNER, ANN
JAFFE BUILDING B17