Courses for Fall 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANTH 001-001 ARCHAEOLOGY: WINDOW TO THE HUMAN PAST SMIT, DOUGLAS EDUCATION BUILDING 203 MW 1100AM-1200PM This course will introduce students to the methods and theory of archaeology by exploring how we turn archaeological data into statements about cultural behavior. We will discuss the place of archaeology in the broader field of anthropology and debate issues facing the discipline today. The course will rely on case studies from around the world and from many different time periods to introduce students to the research process, field and lab methods, and essential questions of archaeological anthropology. Students will have the opportunity to work hands-on with archaeological materials through visiting the galleries and working with Penn Museum collections.
    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
    ANTH 002-001 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY THOMAS, DEBORAH UNIVERSITY MUSEUM B17 MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the anthropological study of human social and cultural diversity throughout the world, with special emphasis on the development of the idea of culture as an analytical concept. The course includes sections on the ethnographic research method and on the library of ethnographic material relating to cultural change in different parts of the world that anthropology has produced since the 19th century.
      Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
      ANTH 002-601 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology SPOONER, BRIAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 T 0530PM-0830PM An introduction to the anthropological study of human social and cultural diversity throughout the world, with special emphasis on the development of the idea of culture as an analytical concept. The course includes sections on the ethnographic research method and on the library of ethnographic material relating to cultural change in different parts of the world that anthropology has produced since the 19th century.
        Society sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
        ANTH 003-001 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN EVOLUTION MONGE, JANET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM B17 TR 0130PM-0230PM How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. First we cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and working with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts.
          Living World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; LIVING WORLD SECTOR
          ANTH 005-601 GREAT TRANSFORMATIONS RENETTE, STEVE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 M 0500PM-0800PM This course explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution. Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop? Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, including the landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economic change from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition, students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum during practicums.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
            ANTH 012-401 GLOBALIZATION AND ITS HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE SPOONER, BRIAN
            GUILLEN, MAURO
            LEIDY LAB 10 M 0200PM-0400PM This course describes and analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural.
              Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              ANTH 022-401 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES SYKES, JIM FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ANTH 022-402 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES SCAHILL, KATHERINE LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 102 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ANTH 022-403 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES JOHNSON, LARISSA LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 102 MWF 1200PM-0100PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ANTH 026-401 BEHIND THE IRON CURTAIN GHODSEE, KRISTEN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2C4 TR 0130PM-0300PM This first-year seminar provides an introduction to the histories, cultures, and societies of Central and Eastern Europe, including Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, and the successor states of Yugoslavia. Through a selection of articles and essays written by anthropologists and sociologists and based on their extended fieldwork in the region, students will explore both the ethnographic method and the experience of everyday life during and after the communist era. Topics will include: popular music under socialism, food and wine, environmental concerns, the status of Muslim minorities, socialist aesthetics, public memory and cultures of commemoration, privatization, advertising, women's rights, gender and sexuality, emergent nationalisms, and the rise of income inequality and homelessness. All readings and assignments in English.
                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                      ANTH 058-401 DOING RESEARCH: QUALITATIVE METHODS AND RESEARCH MITCHELL, LISA CANCELED This interdisciplinary course introduces students to qualitative research methods and frameworks in the social sciences and humanities. The goals of the semester will be for each student to develop their own research proposal for a specific project that they could imagine pursuing over the summer or later in their undergraduate career,and to develop a web-based exhibit of one Penn-based research collection of interest. Students will be introduced to a range of textual, archival and media collections and databases available at Penn, with particular attention to South Asia and other specific regions of interest to course participants. The class will visit the Penn Musuem object collections and archives, the Art library, the Kislak Center for Rare Books and Manuscripts, Film Archives, and other special collections on campus, and meet with a representative from the Center for Undergraduate Research Funding (CURF). Students will learn how to frame an effective research question, situate it in relation to existing research, select the most appropriate methods for addressing the question, and develop an effective research plan. Each week students will be introduced to a new set of frameworks for analysis, see specific examples of their application drawn from anthropological, historical, and related scholarship and have opportunities to practice applying and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of specific methodological tools. Students will also have the opportunity to identify sources of funding for summer research projects and prepare applications for these opportunities as part of the course. The course is ideal as an introduction to both the excellent libraries and research collections housed at Penn, and to a wide range of intellectual frameworks for engaging with these collections - a great way to kick off your undergraduate experience at Penn!
                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                        ANTH 063-401 EAST&WEST:A HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE MODERN WORLD CANNON, BRIAN FISHER-BENNETT HALL 322 TR 0300PM-0430PM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world.
                          Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                          ANTH 063-402 East&West:A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Cultural History of the Modern World DASGUPTA, ISHANI UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 0130PM-0300PM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world.
                            Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                            ANTH 086-301 DESIRE AND DEMAND DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 M 0200PM-0500PM Does consumption shape culture or does culture shape consumption? As even the most mundane purchase becomes socially symbolic and culturally meaningful we can persuasively argue that the concept of "need" has been transformed. Analyzing a variety of physical and virtual consumer venues, the goal of this seminar is to understand and to analyze historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. We investigate social and political-economic factors that impact when and how people purchase goods and argue that behavior attached to consumption includes a nexus of influences that may change periodically in response to external factors. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and require a critical analysis of global/local linkages. The city of Philadelphia becomes the seminar's laboratory as we ask: how have issues of culture, consumption, and global capitalism become intertwined around the world?
                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; FOR FRESHMEN ONLY; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                              ANTH 110-401 Water in the Middle East Throughout History HAMMER, EMILY CHEMISTRY BUILDING 119 TR 1030AM-1200PM Water scarcity is one of most important problems facing much of the Middle Eastand North Africa today. These are arid regions, but human and natural systems have interacted to determine relative water scarcity and abundance at different times and places. This course examines the distribution of water resources throughout the Middle East and the archaeology and anthropology of water exploitation and management over the last 9000 years, looking at continuities and changes through time. Students will learn to make basic digital maps representing Middle Eastern hydro-geography and arguments about modern and historic water resources in the region. The class will cooperatively play an "irrigation management game" designed to familiarize personnel involved in the operation of irrigation schemes with the logistical and social issues involved in water management. We will engage with a variety of media, including academic readings, popular journalism, films, satellite imagery, and digital maps, in our quest to explore whether or not the past can inform present efforts to better manage modern water resources. The course is structured in units focused on each of the major hydro-environmental zones of the Middle East: the river valleys of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Levant, the internal basins of western Central Asia and the Levant, the deserts of Arabia and North Africa, highland zones in Yemen and Iran, and coastal marsh areas along the Persian Gulf. We will examine irrigation systems, water supply systems, and ways of life surrounding water sources known from ethnographic studies, history, and archaeological excavations. These data will allow us to engage with debates in Middle Eastern anthropology, including those concerning the relationship between water and political power, the environment in which the world's earliest cities arose, and the relevance of "lessons of the past" for present and potential future water crises and "water wars." In our final weeks, we will discuss archaeology and historical anthropology's contribution to conceptions of water "sustainability" and examine attempts to revive traditional/ancient technologies and attitudes about water.
                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                ANTH 111-401 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology BOWES, KIMBERLY EDUCATION BUILDING 200 MW 1000AM-1100AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                  ANTH 118-401 WITCHCRAFT & POSSESSION ST.GEORGE, ROBERT COLLEGE HALL 314 MW 0100PM-0200PM This course explores world witchcraft and possession from the persecutions of the early seventeenth century through the rise of Wicca in the twentieth century. The mere mention of these terms, or of such close cousins as demonology, sorcery, exorcism, magic, and the witches Sabbath, raises clear ethnographic and historical challenges. How can the analysis of witchcraft-- including beliefs, patterns of accusation, the general social position of victims, the intensity and timing of witch hunts, and its relation to religious practice, law, language, gender, social marginalization, and property--lead us to a more humane understanding of belief and action? Films such as The Exorcist, The Blair Witch Project, The Crucible, and Three Sovereigns for Sarah will focus discussion.
                                    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                    ANTH 121-401 ORIGIN & CULTR OF CITIES ZETTLER, RICHARD PSYCHOLOGY LAB A30 TR 0130PM-0300PM The UN estimates that 2.9 of the world's 6.1 billion people live in cities and that this percentage is rapidly increasing in many parts of the world. This course examines urban life and urban problems by providing anthropological perspectives on this distinctive form of human association and land use. First we will examine the "origin" of cities, focusing on several of the places where cities first developed, including Mesopotamia and the Valley of Mexico. We will then investigate the internal structure of non-industrial cities by looking at case studies from around the world and from connections between the cities of the past and the city in which we live and work today.
                                      History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
                                      ANTH 122-601 BECOMING HUMAN OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH MEYERSON HALL B13 W 0600PM-0900PM Human evolutionary studies is a composite product of the fieldwork of both Paleolithic archaeology and human paleontology (or what we refer to as "stones and bones"). This marriage of two subdisciplines of anthropology produces a unique set of data that is intellectually managed and driven by theories within anthropology as a whole and even beyond -- to fields such as biology, psychology, and primate ethology, as we try to understand the origins of language, culture, and our unique physical characteristics. In this course, we will jointly discuss and debate the actual evidence of human evolution, describing what the actual evidence is and exploring how far can we take these interpretations.
                                        Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                                        ANTH 134-001 MAKING THE NATURAL WORLD: AN INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL ECOLOGY LYCETT, MARK UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 TR 1200PM-0130PM What are the limits of nature? When do natural systems become human or socio-natural systems? In this course, we examine the human construction of nature both conceptually, through ideas about environment, ecosystem, organism, and ecology; and materially, through trajectories of direct action in and on the landscape. Beginning with a consideration of foundational concepts in human ecology, we will discuss current problems and approaches, centering on political ecology. Readings and case studies are drawn from human-environmental contexts in Oceania, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Europe, and North America. We will also consider topics including a) the relationship between indigenous and technocratic knowledge and resource governance, b) environmental movements themselves as objects of ethnographic study; c) justice and sustainability as environmental goals; d) inequality, displacement and violence as environmental problems; and e) fair trade and food security or sovereignty.
                                          ANTH 141-401 PUBLIC POLICY, MUSEUMS, AND THE ETHICS OF CULTURAL HERITAGE LEVENTHAL, RICHARD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will focus upon and examine the ethics of international heritage and the role that Museums play in the preservation of identity and cultural heritage. The mission of this course will be to inform and educate students about the role of Museums within the 21st century. What is the role and position of antiquities and important cultural objects in Museums? How should Museums acquire these objects and when should they be returned to countries and cultural groups? Examples from current issues will be included in the reading and discussions along with objects and issues within the Penn Museum.
                                            ANTH 148-401 FOOD AND FIRE MOORE, KATHERINE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM WDNR MW 0100PM-0200PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                              Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                              ANTH 152-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF AMERICAN HISTORY: THE NATIONAL PERIOD (1790-2000) SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 R 0130PM-0430PM Anthropology 152 is a lecture-seminar that is open to all students. This coursewill explore American history during the national period (1775 to the present) through a different range of information. Over the last seventy five years the new field of Historical Archaeology (academically first developed at Penn) has excavated numerous sites dating not only from the 19th century but also from the 20th century. Recovered archaeological remains and sites combined with archival sources are now giving us a different and more complete view of the rise of America as a distinctive national state. The emergence of the United States out of the Revolution and formation of a national government will be explored up to the almost compete collapse of this experiment in the Civil War. The spectacular growth of the country following the war during the Industrial Revolution will follow. Specializations centered on European immigrants, African American, and Asian American archaeology will also be covered. Finally the very new topic of the archaeology of the 20th century, including the second half of that century, will be reviewed.
                                                ANTH 153-001 CULTURE AND COMMERCE: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE ECONOMY SMIT, DOUGLAS FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 TR 0130PM-0300PM What is the difference between a farmer's market in West Philadelphia and a bazaar in Cairo? What is the meaning of a gift between friends? What about gifts between enemies? What are the origins, meaning, and purpose of money? What is the relationship between politics and the economy? This course will begin to answer these questions by introducing the field of economic anthropology. The economy is not an isolated phenomenon: it is interconnected with socio-cultural and political factors, thus challenging our conception of what is truly considered to be economic. By highlighting the cultural diversity of economic systems across time and space, including our own contemporary, global economy, students will learn what can be considered natural about the economy, and what is contingent on historical factors of culture, society, or politics. Prior economic coursework is not required, nor will this course entail much quantitative analysis. This is not a course in traditional economics or finance. Instead, we will examine socio-cultural, historical, and biological aspects of different economic arrangements, and discuss how anthropological approaches to the economy draw from larger theoretical perspectives (e.g. Smithian, Marxian, Polanyian, Austrian, etc) Case studies will vary widely and include topics such as gift-giving economies of the South Pacific, power and redistribution of the European BronzeAge, social relationships among 21st century Wall-Street traders, and many others that highlight the diversity of economic practices among human societies. Students will be evaluated on short written responses to readings, a midterm and non-cumulative final exam, and a research paper.
                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                  ANTH 155-301 GLOBALIZATION: CAUSES AND EFFECTS SPOONER, BRIAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 T 0130PM-0430PM Class sessions will be devoted to discussion of the dynamics of globalization with the objective of illuminating the world-historical context of the changes that are happening around us unevenly in different parts of the world today, and developing critical approaches to the available research methodologies and explanatory theories. Weekly readings will be selected from the major researchers in the field, and students will test their ideas in short research projects of their own on questions arising from the discussions. The overall approach will be historical and comparative. Apart from weekly assigned readings and participation in class discussions, requirements for the course include three short research papers.
                                                    FOR FRESHMEN ONLY; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                                    ANTH 160-401 SEX AND SOCIALISM GHODSEE, KRISTEN TOWNE BUILDING 319 TR 1030AM-1200PM This seminar examines classic and current scholarship and literature on gender and sexuality in contemporary Eastern Europe, and examines the dialogue and interchange of ideas between East and West. Although the scholarly and creative works will primarily investigate the changing status of women during the last three decades, the course will also look at changing constructions of masculinity and LGBT movements and communities in the former communist bloc. Topics will include: the woman question before 1989; gender and emerging nationalisms; visual representations in television and film; social movements; work; romance and intimacy; spirituality; and investigations into the constructed concepts of "freedom" and "human rights."
                                                      ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                      ANTH 169-401 WORLDS OF INDIAN OCEAN PETRIE, IAN CANCELED Do oceans serve to divide and demarcate distinct cultures and regions? Or do they facilitate exchange, connection and cosmopolitanism? This course will explore the manner in which the Indian Ocean has played both roles throughout history, and how the nature of those divisions and connections has changed over time from the ancient to the modern world. We will reconstruct the intertwined mercantile, religious and kinship networks that spanned the Indian Ocean world, across the Middle East, East Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia and China, illuminating the histories of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam, while also considering the role of successive imperial political formations, from Rome to Britain. Throughout the semester we will seek to understand the Indian Ocean through the people who lived and worked in its milieu - from consuls and military commanders, to traders, brokers, sailors, prisoners and slaves. Course materials will draw on a variety of disciplines (anthropology, archaeology, material culture, religious studies) to construct the cultural, economic, and environmental history of the Indian Ocean.
                                                        ANTH 190-401 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICA AMPONSAH, DAVID FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 TR 0900AM-1020AM This course provides an introduction to the study of Africa in all its diversity and complexity. Our focus is cultural, geographical, and historical: we will seek to understand Africa's current place in the world political and economic order and learn about the various social and physical factors that have influenced the historical trajectory of the continent. We study the cultural formations and empires that emerged in Africa before European colonial invasion and then how colonialism reshaped those sociocultural forms. We'll learn about the unique kinds of kinship and religion in precolonial Africa and the changes brought about by the spread of Islam and Christianity. Finally, we'll take a close look at contemporary issues such as ethnic violence, migration, popular culture and poverty, and we'll debate the various approaches to understanding those issues.
                                                          Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                                                          ANTH 202-001 LANGUAGE, MIGRATION, DIASPORA CARRUTHERS, ANDREW UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 TR 1030AM-1200PM Centering on the relation between language, migration, and diaspora, this course uses linguistic anthropological approaches to understand how the 'very big' is reflected in the 'very small.' We will approach language use as a process that unfolds in the microclimate of everyday interaction, but whose effects extend to and shape large-scale social processes. We will ask a number of interrelated questions: How does language use shape global phenomena like transnationalism and diasporic populations? How do globalizing forces impact and shape language structure and use? How are mobility and (im)migration enabled or constrained through everyday communicative interaction? We begin by exploring the ideologies inherent in everyday speech, evaluating how language is linked to social identities like class, race, gender, and sexuality, and to social personae like 'the migrant,' 'the refugee,' 'the foreigner,' or to the 'diasporic subject' more generally. We then explore the cultural politics of languages in and across nation-states, attending to their uses and values in unprecedented global flows of information, goods, and people.
                                                            ANTH 212-401 ANIMALS & RELIGION COVEY, ALLISON CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 0430PM-0600PM Religion is full of animals--lions and lambs, monkeys and elephants, buffalo and snakes, even mythical beasts. The identity of the human being is explained, in many traditions, by contrast with the identity of other species. We know who we are because we know who they are, or do we? This course interrogates--through an exploration of sacred texts, art, film, and museum artifacts--the tension present in many traditions between an anthropocentric prioritization of the human being and religious resources that encourage a valuing of other animal species. We'll explore the way animals function both as religious objects and as religious subjects across diverse traditions, asking how human-animal relationships have shaped religion and how religion has shaped the way we think about and interact with other animals. We'll ask how religion has engaged with animals over time and across global cultures, understanding them as symbols, messengers, and manifestations of the divine; as material for ritual and sacrifice; as kin and subordinates; as food and as filth; as helpmeets and as tempters. How have these perspectives shaped animal ethics, influencing the treatment, use, and consumption of animals and their bodies? Finally, we'll ask what it means that we ourselves are evolved animals. How does our own animality factor into the practice of human religion? Is our religious capacity part of what sets us apart from other animals or is religiosity a trait we might expect to find in other species? To what extent is religion a function of the animal?
                                                              ANTH 220-401 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT F 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
                                                                ANTH 220-402 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 F 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
                                                                  ANTH 220-403 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
                                                                    ANTH 220-404 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only)
                                                                      ANTH 221-401 THE MATERIAL WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH
                                                                      BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE
                                                                      JANSEN, JAN
                                                                      UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1030AM-1200PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221/521 will take place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.
                                                                        CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                                        ANTH 223-401 STORYTELLING IN AFRICA BLAKELY, PAMELA WILLIAMS HALL 741 T 0430PM-0730PM African storytellers entertain, educate, and comment obliquely on sensitive andcontroversial issues in artful performance. The course considers motifs, structures, and interpretations of trickster tales and other folktales, storytellers' performance skills, and challenges to presenting oral narrative in written and film texts. The course also explores ways traditional storytelling has inspired African social reformers and artists, particularly filmmakers. Students will have opportunities to view films in class.
                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                          ANTH 234-301 PHARMACEUTICALS AND GLOBAL HEALTH JOINER, MICHAEL M 0500PM-0800PM In some parts of the world, spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people do not have access to basic or life-saving drugs. Individuals struggle to afford medications; whole populations are neglected, considered too poor to constitute profitable markets for the development and distribution of necessary drugs. This seminar analyzes the dynamics of the burgeoning international pharmaceutical trade and the global inequalities that emerge from and are reinforced by market-driven medicine. Questions about who will be treated and who will not filter through every phase of pharmaceutical production --from preclinical research to human testing, marketing, distribution, prescription, and consumption. Whether considering how the pharmaceutical industry shapes popular understandings of mental illness in North America and Great Britain, how Brazil has created a model of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment program, or how the urban pooer in Delhi understand and access healthcare, the seminar draws on anthropological case studies to illuminate the roles of corporations, governments, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in relation to global pharmaceuticals. As we analyze each case and gain famliarity with tehnographic methods, we will ask how individual and group health is shaped by new medical technologies and their evolving regulatory regimes and markets. The course familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes; and it contributes to ethical and political debates on the development and access to new medical technologies.
                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                            ANTH 238-401 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY PETRYNA, ADRIANA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM B17 MW 0100PM-0200PM Introduction to Medical Anthropology takes central concepts in anthropology -- culture, adaptation, human variation, belief, political economy, the body -- and applies them to human health and illness. Students explore key elements of healing systems including healing technologies and healer-patient relationships. Modern day applications for medical anthropology are stressed.
                                                                              Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                                              ANTH 242-401 MUS/REL/RITUAL S&SE ASIA SYKES, JIM LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 101 MW 0200PM-0330PM What role does music play in articulating religious identities and spaces? What is the importance of ritual musics as they persist and change in the modern world? How does music reflect and articulate religious ways of thinking and acting? In this course, we explore these and other questions about the interrelations between music, religion, and ritual in South and Southeast Asia. Focusing on India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, and Indonesia, the course emphasizes musics from Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim and Christian traditions; nevertheless, it draws widely to touch upon sacred musics in Pakistan, Nepal, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, and among some indigenous peoples in the region. Throughout, we explore ontologies of sound; sonic occurrences in religious structures, public processions, and pilgrimage sites; the construction of religion and ritual as ideas forged through colonial encounter and modern scholarship on religion; the politics of sacred sounds in today's public spaces and contemporary media, such as television and online; and the surprising fluidity between popular and sacred musical genres.
                                                                                ANTH 244-001 DISEASE AND HUMAN EVOLUTION SPENCE-AIZENBERG, ANDREA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will explore the role played by disease in human evolution, from the emergence of the human lineage to the present day. We will evaluate both infectious and non-infectious diseases and examine the way in which populations and disease organisms have co-evolved. Related issues to be explored include the nature of the virulence and pathogenicity of infectious agents, and the impact of vaccination on pathogen evolution. In addition, we will discuss the epidemiological transition and the rise of complex diseases of modernization (e.g., diabetes, cancer) that has occurred in the past several centuries. Overall, the course will provide a broader understanding of the influence of disease processes on the evolution of the human species.
                                                                                  ANTH 254-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE INCA ERICKSON, CLARK UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 0300PM-0430PM The Inca created a vast and powerful South American empire in the high Andes Mountains that was finally conquered by Spain. Using Penn's impressive museum collections and other archaeological, linguistic, and historical sources, this course will examine Inca religion and worldview, architecture, sacred temples, the capital of Cuzco, ritual calendar, ceque system, textiles, metalworking, economic policies and expansionist politics from the dual perspectives of Inca rulers and their subjects. Our task is to explain the rise, dominance, and fall of the Incas as a major South American civilization.
                                                                                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
                                                                                    ANTH 258-401 VISUALIZING THE PAST ERICKSON, CLARK
                                                                                    BADLER, NORMAN
                                                                                    3401 WALNUT STREET 401B MWF 1100AM-1200PM This highly interdisciplinary course approaches fundamental issues in Anthropology and Computer Science.Using an anthropological perspective, this course focuses on the history, theory, and methods of how archaeology and visualizations of the past are created, presented and used in scholarly media (e.g., traditional publications, conference papers, and project databases), and popular culture (e.g., artists reconstructions, movies, TV documentaries, museum exhibits, games, the internet, and art), and contemporary computer technology (e.g., 3D modeling, Animation, virtual reality, and simulation). From the computer science perspective, the challenge becomes how we can transform known and often incomplete information into engaging and plausible digital models of a past culture and its people. Students gain acquisition of fundamental computer programming, data analysis, and 3D modeling and animation tools. The course material is broad and requires conceptual integration by the student. The instructors use the SEAS Open Learning Classroom for programing and the Penn Museum to explore artifact collections through Object-Based Learning and evaluate public exhibits and complete an original Final Project to people and visualize the past.
                                                                                      FORMAL REASONING COURSE; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; FORMAL REASONING; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                      ANTH 263-401 MUSIC AND PERF OF AFRICA MULLER, CAROL VAN PELT LIBRARY 452.1 R 0430PM-0730PM This class provides an overview of the most popular musical styles and discussion of the cultural and political contexts in which they emerged in contemporary Africa. Learning to perform a limited range of African music/dance will be part of this course. No prior performance experience required. (Formerly ANTH 253.)
                                                                                        ANTH 294-401 GLOBAL CITIES: URBANIZATION IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH ANAND, NIKHIL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 MW 0200PM-0330PM This course examines the futures of urbanization in most of the world. With cities in "developing" countries set to absorb 95% of urban population growth in the next generation, the course explores the plans, spaces and social experiences of this dramatic urban century. How do proliferating urban populations sustain themselves in the cities of Latin America, Africa and Asia? What kinds of social and political claims do these populations make more just and sustainable cities? The course investigates the ongoing experiences in urban planning, infrastructure development and environmental governance in cities of the Global South. In so doing, it imagines new forms of citizenship, development and sustainability that are currently unfolding in these cities of the future.
                                                                                          ANTH 300-301 RESEARCH SEMINAR RISTVET, LAUREN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 F 0900AM-1200PM ANTH 300 is a Research Seminar for anthropology majors. It defines the Penn anthropology major by bringing together and inter-relating major threads from the different subfields of the Penn anthropology curriculum. Each session includes contributions from members of the standing faculty and seminar discussions of a research theme in which anthropological knowledge is currently progressing.
                                                                                            ANTH 305-301 ANTHROPOLOGY AND POLICY: HISTORY, THEORY, PRACTICE SUESS, GRETCHEN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 W 0330PM-0630PM From the inception of the discipline, anthropologists have applied their ethnographic and theoretical knowledge to policy issues concerning the alleviation of practical human problems. This approach has not only benefited peoples in need but it has also enriched the discipline, providing anthropologists with the opportunity to develop new theories and methodologies from a problem-centered approach. The class will examine the connection between anthropology and policy, theory and practice (or 'praxis'), research and application. We will study these connections by reading about historical and current projects. As an ABCS course, students will also volunteer in a volunteer organization of their choice in the Philadelphia area, conduct anthropological research on the organization, and suggest ways that the anthropological approach might support the efforts of the organization.
                                                                                              AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                                                                              ANTH 317-401 THE POLITICS OF MATTER LYONS, KRISTINA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3N6 M 0200PM-0500PM What is nature? What is culture? What kinds of practices and actors constitute what we call science? Who and what constitute the sphere we refer to as politics? A number of theoretical developments in cultural anthropology, political theory, critical geography, and feminist science studies have problematized the modernist ontological divide between Nature and Culture and a whole series of binary oppositions (such as objects/subjects, matter/form, bio/geo) that follow from it. Taking inspiration from this literature and placing it in conversation with Native and Indigenous scholarship and a series of contemporary socio-environmental struggles occurring in Latin America and beyond, this course will discuss the conceptual-methodological tools that a concern with politics of matter has generated. The epistemic and political implications of these tools go beyond their analytical usefulness as innovative devices to explore novel phenomena. They complicate well-established fields of inquiry, such as political ecology and economy, environmental studies, ethics, social justice, and modern politics; and, indeed, the singular ontology that these fields may inadvertently and explicitly sustain. We will explore how it is that things, stuff, matter, 'nature' came to fall outside modern politics as such, and the kinds of ethico-political repercussions that problematizing this division may produce.
                                                                                                ANTH 325-401 WHO OWNS THE PAST? HAMMER, EMILY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 139 T 0130PM-0430PM This course explores the role of cultural heritage and archaeological discoveries in the politics of the Middle East from the nineteenth century to the recent aftermath of the Arab Spring. We will explore how modern Middle East populations relate to their pasts and how archaeology and cultural heritage have been employed to support particular political and social agendas, including colonialism, nationalism, imperialism, and the construction of ethnic-religious identities. Although it was first introduced to the Middle East as a colonial enterprise by European powers, archaeology became a pivotal tool for local populations of the Middle East to construct new histories and identities during the post-World War I period of intensive nation-building after the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire. To understand this process, we will first look at the nineteenth-century establishment of archaeology by institutions like the Penn Museum. Then we will move on to individual case studies in Turkey, Iraq, Egypt, Israel/Palestine, Iran, and the republics of former Soviet Transcaucasia to look at the role of archaeology and cultural heritage in the formation of these countries as modern nation-states with a shared identity among citizens. We will conclude with an examination of the recent impact of the Islamic State on material heritage in Syria and Iraq, the changing attitudes of Middle Eastern countries toward foreign museums, and the role of UNESCO in defining Middle Eastern sites of world heritage. The course will also include field trips to the Penn Museum.
                                                                                                  History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                  ANTH 332-301 MEDICINE AND THE LANGUAGE OF PAIN CLAPP, JUSTIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 W 0330PM-0630PM Pain can be a particularly complex and morally charged object of biomedicine. The interiority of pain- the deeply private nature of pain experience- complicates its communication. Pain, particularly its chronic form, defies purely biological explanation, troubling fundamental biomedical distinctions between mind and body, subject and object. And decisions about analgesia are fraught, as doctors and patients pursue relief from pain amidst a widespread epidemic of opiate abuse that infuses their interaction with concerns about addiction, drug seeking, culpability, and responsibility. This seminar seeks to shed light on these issues by using concepts from linguistic and medical anthropology to explore how we experience, think about, and talk about pain. As an interdisciplinary endeavor, the course is of relevance not only to anthropology but also to medical sociology, medical ethics, public health, health policy, and science and technology studies.
                                                                                                    ANTH 342-401 DRESS & FASHION IN AFRCA ALI-DINAR, ALI DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4C6 TR 0300PM-0430PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that is influenced by the surrounding forces.
                                                                                                      ANTH 344-401 DOCUMENTARY EXPERIMENTS IN URBAN RESEARCH MENDELSOHN, BENJAMIN VAN PELT LIBRARY 425 R 0430PM-0730PM What can video art, experimental documentary, and sensory ethnography teach us about the practice of urban research? How can we build on the traditions of first person and essay cinema to produce compelling documents of our own questions and findings? This course surveys a range of film and video works on themes such as the production of space, urban nature, infrastructure, and collective memory. Taken as a genre, these time-based works provide a powerful model for training scholars' observational skills, conceptualizing scales of analysis, and engaging broader publics in urban research. In this course, we will explore this audiovisual genre in dialogue with selected theoretical, ethnographic, and case study readings in urban studies. As an advanced theory-practice course, it combines seminar readings and discussion with regular screenings and a series of workshops on photo, video, audio, and postproduction skills. The course will provide a general fluency in contemporary urban research, with particular emphasis on urban political ecology. In dialogue with this scholarship, students will develop and situate their own experimental documentary research projects.
                                                                                                        ANTH 362-401 INT DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGY HERRMANN, JASON CASTER BUILDING A19 MW 0400PM-0530PM Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3D models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.
                                                                                                          ANTH 421-301 ANTHROPOLOGY IN AND OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH BARG, FRANCES UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 T 0130PM-0430PM Anthropology provides a critical lens through which we can understand the multiple ways that environmental toxins affect human health and well-being. In this course, we will explore ways that politics, economics, social dynamics and communication strategies affect the uneven distribution of risk from environmental hazards. We will examine issues related to community engagement, environmental justice, risk perception, citizen science and environmental stigma. Students will have an opportunity to visit a local Superfund site.
                                                                                                            ANTH 447-401 HUMAN REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY SPENCE-AIZENBERG, ANDREA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4N30 TR 0300PM-0430PM This course explores the processes that regulate fertility in human populations. We adopt an evolutionary perspective to examine the factors that have shaped human reproductive physiology and contribute to variation in reproductive parameters between populations. The biology of menarche, ovarian cycling, pregnancy, lactation, fetal loss, and menopause will be reviewed and the ecological and social factors that influence these steps in the reproductive process will be considered.
                                                                                                              ANTH 511-401 ETHICS, ARCHAEOLOGY & CULTURAL HERITAGE LEVENTHAL, RICHARD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 T 0130PM-0430PM This seminar will explore some of the most important issues that are now a central part of archaeological, anthropological and historical research throughout the world. The identification and control of cultural heritage is a central part of the framework for research within other communities. Issues for this course will also include cultural identity, human rights, repatriation, colonialism, working with communities and many other topics. Field research today must be based upon a new series of ethical standards that will be discussed and examined within this class. Major topics include: cultural heritage - definitions and constructs, cosmopolitanism and collecting, archaeology and looting, cultural heritage preservation, museums - universal and national, museum acquisition policies, cultural identity, international conventions (including underwater issues), national laws of ownership, community based development, cultural tourism, development models, and human rights.
                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                ANTH 521-401 THE MATERIAL WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH
                                                                                                                BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE
                                                                                                                JANSEN, JAN
                                                                                                                UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1030AM-1200PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221/521 will take place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.
                                                                                                                  CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                  ANTH 533-401 ARCHAEOBOTANY SEMINAR WHITE, CHANTEL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 T 0130PM-0430PM In this course we will approach the relationship between plants and people from archaeological and anthropological perspectives in order to investigate diverse plant consumption, use, and management strategies. Topics will include: plants as foods and intoxicating beverages; medicines, poisons, and psychoactive plants; plants as building supplies and textiles; wild plant collection, and the origins of plant domestication. Students will learn both field procedures and laboratory methods of archaeobotany through a series of hands-on activities and lab-based experiments. The final research project will involve an original in-depth analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical specimens. By the end of the course, students will feel comfortable reading and evaluating archaeobotanical literature and will have a solid understanding of how archaeobotanists interpret human activities of the past.
                                                                                                                    CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                    ANTH 541-301 CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS WITH SCIENCE(S) AND JUSTICE(S) LYONS, KRISTINA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 T 0130PM-0430PM This course places science studies in conversation with counterforensic and ethnographic methodologies, decolonial and feminist approaches, data and environmental justice, critical race and disability studies, conflict medicine, and speculative fiction, among other topics. We will be looking at the ways that the arts, natural and social sciences, and community-oriented research agendas come together, and what tensions and possibilities these emergent alliances, intersectional modes of thinking, and practical collaborations may produce. This class offers a unique opportunity for graduate students from engineering, natural and social sciences, humanities, and the arts to learn to converse and collaborate around pressing socio-environmental issues. Emergent transdisciplinary fields, such as the environmental and medical humanities, reflect a growing awareness that responses to the socio-environmental dilemmas being faced require the collaborative work of not only diverse scientists, but also more expansive publics, including artists, urban and rural communities, and their relationships with nonhumans and materialities. Aspirations for justice and the possibilities for evidence making require translation across different practices, temporalities and scales; negotiations with the forces of economic structures; and endurance within colonial legacies as well as situations of everyday militarization and social and armed conflict. Throughout the course we will collectively explore moments of newly shared insight, mutual incomprehension, and partial connection between disparate actors and potentially unlikely allies. The idea is not for us to necessarily give up our disciplinary orientations, but rather to learn how to approach shared matters of concern without canceling out our differences and the generative agonisms they produce.
                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                      ANTH 547-401 ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION HALL, KATHLEEN EDUCATION BUILDING 008 T 1200PM-0200PM An introduction to the intent, approach, and contribution of anthropology to the study of socialization and schooling in cross-cultural perspective. Education is examined in traditional, colonial, and complex industrial societies.
                                                                                                                        ANTH 549-301 THE POWER OF THE POT: SOCIAL AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL USES OF CERAMICS KASSABAUM, MEGAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 WF 0930AM-1100AM The subject matter of this seminar will vary by term and instructor. Each course will concern itself with contemporary archaeology through an in-depth examination of new directions in archaeological method and theory. Please check https://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthropology/courses/topics-courses for the term-specific course description.
                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                          ANTH 550-301 MOVEMENT, MOBILITY, MIGRATION CARRUTHERS, ANDREW UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 R 0130PM-0430PM What counts as movement, mobility, and migration? This seminar explores how anthropologists have examined movement, mobility, and migration from various angles of vision. We attend to a wide range of interlocking issues across different contexts: proprioception and kinaesthesia; dance and the body; spatial orientation and deictic selectivity; market forces and transnational flows; cellular migration and membrane transport; migration infrastructures and cross-border channels; affect and social mobility; and much else besides. We will attempt to theorize the relation between movement, mobility, and migration - three phenomena that are sometimes unproductively conflated in the anthropological literature.
                                                                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                            ANTH 554-301 TRUTH, POLITICS, ETHICS PETRYNA, ADRIANA CANCELED This is a reading-intensive seminar geared primarily toward anthropology graduate students who have had some field research experience or are uncovering surprising findings that come from deep ethnographic engagement, and who are now grappling with the implications, production, and narration of evidence for themselves and for larger publics. Drawing from readings in anthropology, philosophy, psychoanalysis, and the history and sociology of science, we will develop our craft as an intimate practice and work of careful translation in the context of a demanding set of readings on the political economy of truth, hypocrisy, ethics, and bias.
                                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                              ANTH 559-401 AUDIO ETHNOGRAPHY KAREL, ERNST VAN PELT LIBRARY 452.1 R 0130PM-0430PM This is an intensive, graduate-level, practice-based course in which students will record, edit, and produce anthropologically informed audio works that record and interpret culture and lived experience. Projects in this class will look beyond conventional linguistic or musical codes to sounds whose semiotic or affective value may be less immediately evident. Through the process of making location recordings, analyzing those recordings, composing them into autonomous works, and critiquing every step of the way, this course will engage with questions of ethnographic representation through the medium of sound. In parallel with contextualizing readings and sound projections, throughout the semester students will work intensively on audio projects, receiving training on recording techniques, audio editing, and basic post-production techniques. The course is an opportunity to open up the question of what might constitute 'audio documentary' or 'ethnographic audio'. Presentation strategies for final projects will be discussed and decided on individual bases. Projects will be situated in relationship to cognate fields, including the anthropology of the senses, interdisciplinary sound studies, ethnomusicology, ethnographic cinema, sound art, sound mapping, soundscape composition, and experimental nonfiction media practices which involve location recording. Through weekly sound projections and home listening, students will also gain a familiarity with existing genres and uses of nonfiction audio in anthropology and related fields.
                                                                                                                                SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                ANTH 559-402 LABORATORY KAREL, ERNST VAN PELT LIBRARY 452.1 T 0600PM-0900PM This is an intensive, graduate-level, practice-based course in which students will record, edit, and produce anthropologically informed audio works that record and interpret culture and lived experience. Projects in this class will look beyond conventional linguistic or musical codes to sounds whose semiotic or affective value may be less immediately evident. Through the process of making location recordings, analyzing those recordings, composing them into autonomous works, and critiquing every step of the way, this course will engage with questions of ethnographic representation through the medium of sound. In parallel with contextualizing readings and sound projections, throughout the semester students will work intensively on audio projects, receiving training on recording techniques, audio editing, and basic post-production techniques. The course is an opportunity to open up the question of what might constitute 'audio documentary' or 'ethnographic audio'. Presentation strategies for final projects will be discussed and decided on individual bases. Projects will be situated in relationship to cognate fields, including the anthropology of the senses, interdisciplinary sound studies, ethnomusicology, ethnographic cinema, sound art, sound mapping, soundscape composition, and experimental nonfiction media practices which involve location recording. Through weekly sound projections and home listening, students will also gain a familiarity with existing genres and uses of nonfiction audio in anthropology and related fields.
                                                                                                                                  SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                  ANTH 562-401 INT DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGY HERRMANN, JASON CASTER BUILDING A19 MW 0400PM-0530PM Digital methods allow archaeologists to approach research questions about the human past with increasing accuracies on larger datasets and at multiple scales. This class introduces students to the three main steps of digital archaeology: data management, analysis, and sharing. Data management involves the design, creation, and curation of digital objects that capture the archaeological process and evidence. Students will gain deep familiarity in working with the main types of digital archaeological data: structured data (relational databases), 3D models/spatial data, and raster images. The class will provide abundant hands-on experience with the latest equipment and software for working with many different kinds of data. We will learn about data analysis techniques through a close examination of a variety of case studies in the literature that demonstrate how other archaeologists have applied digital methods to their archaeological questions. Finally, we will discuss the importance of sharing data through open access data publication and we will apply our skills with structured data to existing online archaeological datasets. The goal of this class is to prepare students to make methodological decisions during future research endeavors, both in the field and in the archaeological lab.
                                                                                                                                    ANTH 583-401 ETHNOGRAPHIC FILMMAKING DAS, AMITANSHU 3440 MARKET STREET 372 W 0200PM-0500PM This ethnographic methodology course considers filmmaking/videography as a tool in conducting ethnographic research as well as a medium for presenting academic research to scholarly and non-scholarly audiences. The course engages the methodological and theoretical implications of capturing data and crafting social scientific accounts/narratives in images and sounds. Students are required to put theory into practice by conducting ethnographic research and producing an ethnographic film as their final project. In service to that goal, students will read about ethnography (as a social scientific method and representational genre), learn and utilize ethnographic methods in fieldwork, watch non-fiction films (to be analyzed for formal properties and implicit assumptions about culture/sociality), and acquire rigorous training in the skills and craft of digital video production. This is an ABCS course, and students will produce short ethnographic films with students in Philadelphia high schools as part of a partnership project with the School District of Philadelphia. Due to the time needed for ethnographic film production, this is a year-long course, which will meet periodically in both the fall and spring semesters.
                                                                                                                                      AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                      ANTH 598-640 ECONOMICS OF HERITAGE GOULD, PETER UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 R 0530PM-0840PM Governmental resources for archaeological and heritage sites are declining worldwide while commercial and economic development initiatives are threatening the fabric of heritage and the larger landscape environment to ever greater degrees. As a consequence, the competition for resources to protect and preserve heritage is intensifying, as is the challenge to articulate the value of heritage resources vs. competing commercial or public projects. This is the context for understanding the issues surrounding the definition of the value of cultural heritage assets and the tools available for their measurement and management. This course explores in some depth issues relating to the economic analysis of heritage and culture. It is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the economics of heritage-related projects, the tools and techniques available for their analysis and the ethical and practical issues of public policy and private actions that determine the future of heritage resources. Readings and case studies will explore technical, practical and ethical issues that arise in cultural heritageeconomics. Relevant analytical techniques will be introduced and particular emphasis will be placed on commercial, government and community issues unique to heritage-related activities. Special emphasis will be placed upon developing pertinent strategies for the tourist industry. Students will produce one case-study project intended to integrate the technical and practical aspects of the course.
                                                                                                                                        ANTH 600-301 CONTEMPORARY ARCHAEOLOGY IN THEORY RISTVET, LAUREN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 M 0200PM-0500PM This graduate seminar addresses contemporary anthropological archaeology and considers the varied ways inferences are made about past and present human behavior from the archaeological record. It reviews such fundamental topics as the use of analogy, Middle Range theory, symbolism and meaning, social and cultural evolution, ideology and power, feminism and gender, and indigenous (non-Western) perspectives. It also foregrounds basic issues regarding heritage, looting, and ethics.
                                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                          ANTH 603-301 LANGUAGE IN CULTURE AND SOCIETY AGHA, ASIF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 410 MW 1000AM-1200PM First-year anthropology graduate students or Instructor Permission. Examination of properties of human language which enable social persons to interpret the cultural world and to act within it. Topics include: principles of lexical and grammatical organization; the role of language structure (grammar) and linguistic context (indexicality) in discursive activity; referential uses of language; social interaction; markers of social role, identity, and group-belonging; criteria by which models of linguistic form and function are formulated; the empirical limits within which different models have explanatory value.
                                                                                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                                            ANTH 631-301 GRAMMATICAL CATEGORIES AGHA, ASIF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 410 R 1000AM-0100PM The course is an introduction to grammatical organization in human language for students in linguistic anthropology and associated fields. Primary foci: methods for the analysis of grammatical categories; constituency and propositional content; grammatical typology and universals. Other topics: relationship of grammatical categories to other principles organizing communication, conceptualization and interpersonal conduct; analysis of interlocking category systems; relationship of categories to actual human behavior. Students are encouraged to apply the techniques developed in lectures and assigned readings to the analysis of a non-Indo-European language over the course of the semester.
                                                                                                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                                              ANTH 655-301 METHODS AND GRANTWRITING FOR ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH THOMAS, DEBORAH UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 T 1000AM-0100PM This course is designed for third- and fourth-year graduate students in anthropology who are working on their dissertation research proposals and submitting grants. Graduate students from other departments who will be submitting grant proposals that include an ethnographic component are also welcome. Students will develop their proposals throughout the course of the semester, and will meet important fall submission deadlines. They will begin by working with various databases to search funding sources relevant to the research they plan to conduct. In class sessions, they will also work with the professor and their peers to refine their research questions, their methods, the relationship of any previous research to their dissertation fieldwork, and the broader theoretical and "real-world" significance of their proposed projects. Finally, students will also have the opportunity to have live "chats" with representatives from funding agencies, thereby gaining a better sense of what particular foundations are looking for in a proposal.
                                                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                ANTH 658-301 DISCOURSE-CENTERED RESEARCH SEMINAR URBAN, GREGORY MCNEIL BUILDING 409 F 1000AM-0100PM This seminar explores the interface between discourse, culture, and social processes. It is designed for graduate students in anthropology and related disciplines who (1) wish to study the current literature in linguistic anthropology concerned with discourse-centered approaches to culture; and (2) themselves have or will acquire during the semester discourse materials (texts, recordings, ethnographic data, etc.) that they wish to analyze from an anthropological point view. The instructor will spend time discussing his own past and current research. Class sessions will also include discussion of the writings of contemporary anthropologists investigating culture through discourse. The seminar is designed for maximum flexibility in accommodating students' research interests and needs.
                                                                                                                                                  CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                  ANTH 720-401 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT F 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                    ANTH 720-402 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 F 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                      ANTH 720-403 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                        ANTH 720-404 ARCHAEOLOGY LABORATORY FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                          ANTH 733-301 FOOD - COLLOQUIUM 2019-2020 HOKE, MORGAN
                                                                                                                                                          KASSABAUM, MEGAN
                                                                                                                                                          UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 M 1200PM-0300PM This graduate seminar is a full year course open to second year anthropology graduate students. Other interested students should contact the instructors for permission before enrolling. Topic changes each year, corresponding to the Penn Anthropology Department Colloquium series.
                                                                                                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                                                            ANTH 741-301 ANTHROPOLOGY OF AFFECT URBAN, GREGORY UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 R 0300PM-0600PM This course draws upon three anthropological literatures pertaining to affect. One, growing out of Darwin's observations in The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals, looks at the evolutionary and neurobiological bases of affect. A second developed in connection with psychoanalysis, and centers upon insights gained through empathic and introspective processes. A third arose with cultural studies and reactions within anthropology to structuralism, including research on cross-cultural variation in the conceptualization of emotions. The course is appropriate for graduate students interested in exploring the linkages among these literatures, and who envision or are already actively undertaking research for which knowledge of them is pertinent. Students will be expected to lead discussions of specific works, as well as present aspects of their own present or proposed future research. Students outside of the Anthropology Department should contact the instructor to request a permit.
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                                                                                                                                                              ANTH 753-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF AMERICAN HISTORY: THE NATIONAL PERIOD (1790-2000) SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 R 0130PM-0430PM
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