Courses for Spring 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANTH 001-601 ARCHAEOLOGY: WINDOW TO THE HUMAN PAST CLAY, ELIZABETH W 0630PM-0930PM This course will introduce students to the methods and theory of archaeology by exploring how we turn archaeological data into statements about cultural behavior. We will discuss the place of archaeology in the broader field of anthropology and debate issues facing the discipline today. The course will rely on case studies from around the world and from many different time periods to introduce students to the research process, field and lab methods, and essential questions of archaeological anthropology. Students will have the opportunity to work hands-on with archaeological materials through visiting the galleries and working with Penn Museum collections.
    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
    ANTH 002-601 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology BURKE, KEVIN M 0500PM-0800PM An introduction to the anthropological study of human social and cultural diversity throughout the world, with special emphasis on the development of the idea of culture as an analytical concept. The course includes sections on the ethnographic research method and on the library of ethnographic material relating to cultural change in different parts of the world that anthropology has produced since the 19th century.
      Society sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ANTH 003-601 INTRO TO HUMAN EVOLUTION OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH TR 0700PM-0830PM How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. First we cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and working with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts.
        Living World Sector (all classes) LIVING WORLD SECTOR
        ANTH 004-001 THE MODERN WORLD AND ITS CULTURAL BACKGROUND URBAN, GREGORY MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity: ethnicities, religions, languages, political forms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations". Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, in which we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attention to the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context.
          Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ANTH 005-001 GREAT TRANSFORMATIONS SMIT, DOUGLAS TR 1030AM-1200PM This course explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution. Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop? Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, including the landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economic change from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition, students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum during practicums.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
            ANTH 022-401 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES SCAHILL, KATHERINE MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              ANTH 022-402 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES JOHNSON, LARISSA MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ANTH 022-403 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES CHAVANNES, DAVID MWF 1200PM-0100PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ANTH 022-404 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES BRODY, BINA TR 1200PM-0130PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ANTH 053-401 MUSIC IN TROUBLED PLACES SYKES, JIM TR 1030AM-1200PM In this class, we go beyond the headlines to discuss the history and cultures of peoples who have had to endure terrible suffering, particularly through ethnic conflict and civil war. We will focus on a curious phenomenon: populations typically defined as separate from one another (e.g., Israelis and Palestinians) often have a history of shared or related cultural practices, of which music is a prime example. We will survey a number of current and recent conflict zones and use music as a way to deepen our understanding of the identities and relationships between the peoples involved including through a consideration of my own fieldwork in Sri Lanka. Querying the very definitions of music, trouble, and place, the course then broadens out to consider how musicians have been affected by and/or responded to important global problems like slavery, sexual violence, climate change and other ecological disasters, like Hurricane Katrina. Regions to be considered in our lectures and/or readings include: Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria (including Kurdish musics), Israel-Palestine, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, Myanmar/Burma, Uganda, Sierra Leone, North and South Korea, the Marshall Islands, Cambodia, Mexico, and the United States.
                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                      ANTH 054-401 RELIGION AND RESISTANCE IN SOUTH ASIA MOHAMMAD, MAHBOOB MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course, we focus on various medieval and contemporary devotional forms of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam in South Asia. Several definitions try to tie the idea of devotion to classicism and traditionalism with a set of conservative ideas. However, this course introduces the students to a diverse and pluralistic understanding of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam that also has a history of resistance and protest beginning with poets such as Kabir and others from the Bhakti movement, and Sufi devotional contexts in South Asia. We read about the histories of these rebellious poets and their interventions into the traditional practices of devotion. We also discuss about how these medieval trends find their way into contemporary times enriching the discourses of Dalit, Muslim and Feminist movements.
                        ANTH 100-401 ANTH & THE MODERN WORLD: AFGHANISTAN, IRAN, AND PAKISTAN SPOONER, BRIAN M 0200PM-0500PM This course relates anthropological models and methods to current problems in the Modern World. The overall objective is to show how the research findings and analytical concepts of anthropology may be used to illuminate and explain events as they have unfolded in the recent news and in the course of the semester. Each edition of the course will focus on a particular country or region that has been in the news.
                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          ANTH 104-401 SEX & HUMAN NATURE SCHURR, THEODORE TR 1200PM-0130PM This course is an introduction to the scientific study of sex in humans. Within an evolutionary framework, the course examines genetic, physiological, ecological, social and behavioral aspects of sex in humans. After providing the basic principles of evolutionary biology, the course delves into the development of sexual anatomy and physiology. Among the subjects to be explored are sex determination, the nature of orgasms, and the sexual development of females and males from birth to adulthood. The role of ecology and social life in shaping human mating patterns is also evaluated using ethnographic and cross-cultural materials from a variety of human cultures. In particular, the course examines why humans marry or pair bond, whether there is a biological basis of love, which biological and psychological factors produce jealousy. Finally, the course explores topics relevant to human sexuality today, such as the "hook-up culture", contraception and abortion, sex work, sexual transmitted diseases, and the ethical and legal dimensions of human sexuality.
                            Living World Sector (all classes) LIVING WORLD SECTOR
                            ANTH 107-401 THE CITY IN SOUTH ASIA MITCHELL, LISA MW 1100AM-1150AM This interdisciplinary social science course examines key topics, themes, and analytic methods in the study of South Asia by focusing on significant South Asian cities. With one-fifth of the worlds population,South Asia and its urban centers are playing an increasingly important role in recent global economic transformations, resulting in fundamental changes within both the subcontinent and the larger world. Drawing primarily on ethnographic studies of South Asia in the context of rapid historical change, the course also incorporates research drawn from urban studies, architecture, political science, and history, as well as fiction and film.
                              Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ANTH 109-301 ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE SENSES RISTVET, LAUREN MW 0200PM-0330PM Smelling, seeing, hearing, tasting, and touching are the foundation of our empirical knowledge of the world, providing the most basic information we have. These senses are biological yet our sense perception how we see, smell, taste, hear, and touch is both shaped by and shapes our different cultures. As a result, they provide a useful framework to investigate a classic problem in anthropology, the intersection between biology and culture. This class investigates the senses as cultural and historical phenomena, drawing on readings from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, history, psychology, musicology, and cultural studies.
                                HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                ANTH 122-001 BECOMING HUMAN MONGE, JANET TR 0130PM-0300PM Human evolutionary studies is a composite product of the fieldwork of both Paleolithic archaeology and human paleontology (or what we refer to as "stones and bones"). This marriage of two subdisciplines of anthropology produces a unique set of data that is intellectually managed and driven by theories within anthropology as a whole and even beyond -- to fields such as biology, psychology, and primate ethology, as we try to understand the origins of language, culture, and our unique physical characteristics. In this course, we will jointly discuss and debate the actual evidence of human evolution, describing what the actual evidence is and exploring how far can we take these interpretations.
                                  Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                                  ANTH 123-001 COMMUNICATION & CULTURE AGHA, ASIF MW 1000AM-1100AM The course looks at varieties of human expression -- such as art, film, language and song -- as communicative practices that connect persons together to form a common culture. Discussion is centered around particular case studies and ethnographic examples. Examination of communicative practices in terms of the types of expressive signs they employ, their capacity to formulate and transmit cultural beliefs and ideals (such as conceptions of politics, nature, and self), and to define the size and characteristics of groups and communities sharing such ideals. Discussion of the role of media, social institutions, and technologies of communication (print, electronic). Emphasis on contemporary communicative practices and the forms of culture that emerge in the modern world.
                                    Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
                                    ANTH 143-001 BEING HUMAN: BIOLOGY, CULTURE, & HUMAN DIVERSITY HOKE, MORGAN MW 0330PM-0500PM This course will investigate human biology from evolutionary and biocultural perspectives. Using this approach, the class will explore what it means to be human. We will examine humans as mammals, as primates, and as hominins (our own lineage). We will also study the basics of human genetics, growth and development, immune function, nutrition, life history, and adaptations to diet and disease. In addition, we will review biological variation in contemporary and past societies and the evolutionary processes that helped to shape them.
                                      ANTH 149-301 INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE AMERICAN AND INDIGENOUS STUDIES BRUCHAC, MARGARET TR 0130PM-0300PM This course offers a broad introduction to evolving scholarship in the combined fields of Native American Studies and Indigenous Studies worldwide. Students will examine the various ways that Indigenous peoples and academic researchers are currently engaging with Indigenous knowledges, while also exploring the lingering impacts of settler colonialism and the influence of decolonizing methodologies. Students will gain foundational understandings of the cross-disciplinary nature of Native American and Indigenous Studies (NAIS), by studying theoretical interpretations of Indigenous peoples in academic and historical contexts, and by examining practical approaches to Indigenous research in diverse worldwide settings. Students will approach topics from a variety of disciplinary traditions, utilizing historical texts, ethnological studies, oral literature, material culture, and modern media, including websites and databases produced by and for Indigenous communities. Readings will include the work of researchers who bridge the disciplines of anthropology, history, folklore, art, law, science, etc. Students will watch a selection of films by Indigenous filmmakers, and attend lectures by a selection of Indigenous guest speakers. NAIS faculty advisors from various schools at Penn (e.g., School of Arts and Sciences, Education, Law, Nursing) will also present several guest lectures to highlight their unique experiences and research projects with Indigenous communities. Special case studies will focus on: new directions in collaborative research; issues in museum representation and repatriation; heritage site protection and Indigenous archaeology; legal interventions and protections for Indigenous rights; and innovative projects in language restoration and cultural recovery.
                                        ANTH 159-401 POPULATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH IN EASTERN EUROPE GHODSEE, KRISTEN TR 1030AM-1200PM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English.
                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                          ANTH 220-601 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT F 0630PM-0930PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                            Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                            ANTH 220-602 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                              Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                              ANTH 220-603 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                ANTH 230-401 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY MONGE, JANET F 0200PM-0500PM This course will investigate and discuss the various techniques of analysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysis of life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations of forensic anthropology and the application of DNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.
                                                  ANTH 234-601 PHARMA & GLOBAL HEALTH JOINER, MICHAEL M 0530PM-0830PM In some parts of the world, spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people do not have access to basic or life-saving drugs. Individuals struggle to afford medications; whole populations are neglected, considered too poor to constitute profitable markets for the development and distribution of necessary drugs. This seminar analyzes the dynamics of the burgeoning international pharmaceutical trade and the global inequalities that emerge from and are reinforced by market-driven medicine. Questions about who will be treated and who will not filter through every phase of pharmaceutical production --from preclinical research to human testing, marketing, distribution, prescription, and consumption. Whether considering how the pharmaceutical industry shapes popular understandings of mental illness in North America and Great Britain, how Brazil has created a model of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment program, or how the urban pooer in Delhi understand and access healthcare, the seminar draws on anthropological case studies to illuminate the roles of corporations, governments, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in relation to global pharmaceuticals. As we analyze each case and gain famliarity with tehnographic methods, we will ask how individual and group health is shaped by new medical technologies and their evolving regulatory regimes and markets. The course familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes; and it contributes to ethical and political debates on the development and access to new medical technologies.
                                                    ANTH 255-401 MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIA CARRUTHERS, ANDREW TR 0300PM-0430PM This freshman-friendly course provides a broad introductory overview of modern Southeast Asia, surveying the region's extraordinary diversity and ongoing social, economic, and political transformations. Centering on the nation-states that have emerged following the second World War, we will assess elements of Southeast Asian geography, history, language and literature, cosmologies, kinship systems, music, art and architecture, agriculture, industrialization and urbanization, politics, and economic change. We will remain particularly attentive to the ways Southeast Asians negotiate and contend with ongoing challenges with modernization, development, and globalization.
                                                      ANTH 260-301 CULTURES OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PETRYNA, ADRIANA M 0200PM-0500PM Science and technology figure centrally in the economic, political, and socio-cultural changes that impact our worlds. Happenings in the life sciences, including the discovery of new genes, pathways, and processes, are redrawing concepts of the body and human nature and refiguring social and political relations. The seminar starts from the premise that scientific facts are made, not things existing a priori in the world and that are merely picked up by researchers and consumed by lay audiences. Likewise, technologies are created through a process of intense negotiation between producers and their sophisticated users. Focusing on the biosciences, we explore the production of science and technology and how they 1)affect individuals, self-identities, subjectivity, kinship, and social relationships; 2)have interacted with or reinforced political programs, racial classifications, unequal access to knowledge, and patterns of social injustice; 3)inform contemporary institutional structures, strategies of governance, and practices of citizenship. We will combine methods and perspectives from social and cultural anthropology, and the social studies of science and technology, and will draw from historical case studies, contemporary ethnographies of science, scientific and medical journals, documentary films and media reports.
                                                        BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                        ANTH 267-401 LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                        MONGE, JANET
                                                        WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                        TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                          OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                          ANTH 276-301 ETHNOGRAPHIC APPROACHES TO URBAN ATHLETICS AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SUESS, GRETCHEN TR 1030AM-1200PM Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on bridging theory and practice motivated by a commitment to social justice through original ethnographic research. In particular, this course will focus on kinesiology and the anthropology of sports and well-being through intense analysis of the Young Quakers Community Athletics (YQCA) program, a collaboration between the Netter Center for Community Partnerships and Penn Athletics. In guest lecturers from multiple disciplines will help to round out the course. The core learning objective is to bring a broad range of specialized expertise to foster a holistic examination of a complex institutional partnership intended to promote positive social transformation and improved human health and well-being.
                                                            AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                                            ANTH 317-401 THE POLITICS OF MATTER LYONS, KRISTINA W 0330PM-0630PM What is nature? What is culture? What kinds of practices and actors constitute what we call science? Who and what constitute the sphere we refer to as politics? A number of theoretical developments in cultural anthropology, political theory, critical geography, and feminist science studies have problematized the modernist ontological divide between Nature and Culture and a whole series of binary oppositions (such as objects/subjects, matter/form, bio/geo) that follow from it. Taking inspiration from this literature and placing it in conversation with Native and Indigenous scholarship and a series of contemporary socio-environmental struggles occurring in Latin America and beyond, this course will discuss the conceptual-methodological tools that a concern with politics of matter has generated. The epistemic and political implications of these tools go beyond their analytical usefulness as innovative devices to explore novel phenomena. They complicate well-established fields of inquiry, such as political ecology and economy, environmental studies, ethics, social justice, and modern politics; and, indeed, the singular ontology that these fields may inadvertently and explicitly sustain. We will explore how it is that things, stuff, matter, 'nature' came to fall outside modern politics as such, and the kinds of ethico-political repercussions that problematizing this division may produce.
                                                              ANTH 323-401 ORIGINS OF WRITING / ORIGINS OF ART PITTMAN, HOLLY W 0200PM-0500PM Each of the earliest systems of writing had intimate and enduring ties to pictorial traditions. This seminar addresses the fundamental relationship between texts and visual imagery in the Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Chinese, and Maya traditions. The class will take a comparative approach to examine the parallel development of scripts and images, extending from their earliest beginnings to their on-going lives as mature systems. As the individual scripts became more capable of representing speech, the subject matter, composition, and function of images changed, and one goal of this class is to identify these processes. Emphasis will be put on seeing text and image as collaborative and interactive constructions, in which parts of a single message can be encoded and presented in different ways. The class will make extensive use of the collections and the curatorial expertise of the Penn Museum.
                                                                OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                                                ANTH 328-001 PERFORMING CULTURE BRUCHAC, MARGARET W 0200PM-0500PM This course analyzes cultural performances as sites for the formation, expression, and transmission of social identity. Students will read ethnographies, critiques, and reports of performance genres including ritual, theater, music, dance, art, and spoken word, with a particular focus on Native American and Indigenous arts and expressions. Topics include: expressive culture as survivance; debates around authenticity and invented traditions; public identity and sexuality; political resistance; the effects of globalization; transnationalism and hybridity; cultural appropriation; and the transformation of folk performances in the wake of modern media.
                                                                  CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                  ANTH 333-401 GLOBAL TRANS* FIERECK, KIRK W 0200PM-0500PM How do prevailing economic and political ideologies influence trans* experiences and theories of gender and sexuality? This course will examine this question from disciplinary perspectives across the social sciences and humanities. The main theme students will explore is that, as social relations, transgender identities or trans*ness as well as sex, gender and sexuality are produced through the interplay of individual desires and bodies with social norms. Just as sex and sexuality are not natural, unchanging entities or deep, inner essences of self or personhood, trans*ness is radically different where- and whenever it emerges across human societies. The course will survey theoretical and practical discussions over the implications of envisioning both trans*ness as both radical and normative; as sites for progressive politics as well as reinforcing oppressive social relations. Students will engage with a dimensional perspective, in lieu of the secret ethnocentrisms of "intersectionality". Dimensionality makes visible markers of social difference, such as class, and nation as well as economic forces, that intersectionality ignores, and which change the many natures of global trans*ness.
                                                                    ANTH 334-401 FEMINIST ETHNOGRAPHY THOMAS, DEBORAH M 0330PM-0630PM This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.
                                                                      ANTH 344-401 DOCUMENTARY EXPERIMENTS IN URBAN RESEARCH MENDELSOHN, BENJAMIN TR 1030AM-1150AM What can video art, experimental documentary, and sensory ethnography teach us about the practice of urban research? How can we build on the traditions of first person and essay cinema to produce compelling documents of our own questions and findings? This course surveys a range of film and video works on themes such as the production of space, urban nature, infrastructure, and collective memory. Taken as a genre, these time-based works provide a powerful model for training scholars' observational skills, conceptualizing scales of analysis, and engaging broader publics in urban research. In this course, we will explore this audiovisual genre in dialogue with selected theoretical, ethnographic, and case study readings in urban studies. As an advanced theory-practice course, it combines seminar readings and discussion with regular screenings and a series of workshops on photo, video, audio, and postproduction skills. The course will provide a general fluency in contemporary urban research, with particular emphasis on urban political ecology. In dialogue with this scholarship, students will develop and situate their own experimental documentary research projects.
                                                                        ANTH 347-301 ANTH OF CORPORATIONS URBAN, GREGORY T 0300PM-0600PM Modern business corporations can be characterized as having their own internal cultures, more or less distinct from one another. They also exist within encompassing cultures and cultural flows. At the same time, corporations are producers and disseminators, and thus have effects on their surrounding environments, effects that extend from the local to the global. This course examines modern corporations from these three perspectives through theoretical and ethnographic readings, guest speakers from the corporate world, and independent research conducted by the students. Course requirements include student presentations of their research and readings; one or more take-home exams; and a final research paper.
                                                                          BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                          ANTH 361-401 GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY SPOONER, BRIAN T 0500PM-0800PM This is an interdisciplinary course on the problems of food demand and consumption, production and supply in our increasingly globalized and urbanizing world. Special attention will be given to the intersections of current technologies of food production, current nutritional problems, environmental change and resource degradation, and the changing quality of human social life under globalization. Where and how will sufficient nutritious food be produced sustainably and how can the politics and economics of equitable distribution in such large urban populations be achieved? (Previously ANTH 561)
                                                                            ANTH 372-301 WORLDING THE DIGITAL: HOW TECHNOLOGIES TRAVEL POGGIALI, LISA T 0130PM-0430PM This course takes Heidegger's notion of 'worlding' as its point of departure to explore how technologies, and ideas about them, travel in different global contexts. Topics include how debates about governance and citizenship were stirred by social media's use in the "Arab Spring"; how emergent technology sectors in Accra and Bangalore impact social structures, national economies, and transnational relations; and how mobile phones have been used to invigorate democracy and deepen inequality in places like Jamaica and Kenya. Throughout, we will assess the social and political impact of both the technologies and the theories that frame them by examining concrete case studies of technological production and use. We will also incorporate insights from the digital humanities in order to design our own technologies from the perspective of a user in the "global South." No prior digital humanities expertise is necessary.
                                                                              ANTH 386-601 CULTURE, PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE W 0530PM-0830PM The goal of this course is to understand and to investigate both historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. Reading topics cover both contemporary and scholarly issues in cultural anthropology, popular culture, consumer behavior, off-shore production, social networking, media and communications, financial and real estate markets and marketing. Class distinctions are equally interdisciplinary as we focus on investigating and identifying critical global/local linkages. We analyze the various ways in which Philadelphia and other "global cities" are competing for consumer revenues. We ask what factors have led contemporary society reaching its current stage of mass consumption and how have certain goods and services been reconfigured, packaged or re-packaged to attract new consumers. In order to better understand the link between consumption and production factors we explore the relationship between outsourcing and/or offshore production and modern consumption. Approximately sixty percent of the seminar takes place in the classroom and will include lecture, class discussion, and films. The remaining portion of the class meetings will involve local and regional travel. Research assignments emphasize the use of anthropological participant-observation techniques to investigate the relationships between culture and contemporary mass consumption within the contexts of re-gentrification, urbanization, and globalization.
                                                                                CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                ANTH 391-301 MULTI-MODAL ETHNOGRAPHY:: BLACK WOMEN MOVING (SPRING 2019) T 0130PM-0430PM What does the digital age mean for humanistic, social scientific, and professional inquiry and practice? How do non-text based formats - such as film, dance and other kinds of performance, creative writing, and soundscapes - transform both the processes and products of research? How do they inform and transform our disciplines, and what might this mean for the communities with which we work? This advanced undergraduate seminar will address these (and other related) questions. Taught by the invited Fellows from the Center for Experimental Ethnography, this course will take shape differently each semester according to the Fellow's area of expertise and practice. Students will be encouraged to explore alternative formats of representation that move beyond text while still being grounded in ethnographic research, and they will develop skills in relevant media. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthropology/courses/topics-courses
                                                                                  ANTH 402-301 APPLIED RESEARCH SKILLS IN GLOBAL COMMUNITY HEALTH BREAM, KENT
                                                                                  BARG, FRANCES
                                                                                  W 0200PM-0500PM While political borders remain, social and human borders fall with the increasing movement of people, ideas, and resources across geographies. What is global becomes local. While biomedical and counting sciences advance, the human experience and influence remain core to understanding behavior, beliefs, and awareness. What is human remains paramount. The Maya Western Highlands of Guatemala are undergoing health changes (trauma, maternal-infant health, diabetes, mental health) through economic development and continued human migration to and from the US. The Cobbs Creek neighborhood in West Philadelphia is also facing epidemics of non-communicable diseases. In this context, Applied Skills in Global Community Health will provide academic and professional skills development in comparing the role of culture, history and politics in the health of a population in transition (demographic, nutritional, epidemiologic, economic) in both settings. Classroom work will occur in the spring of each year combined with a short (1 wk) field experience in the Western Highlands of Guatemala. In addition students will examine health and community research in the Cobbs Creek neighborhood of West Philadelphia. Students may substitute 10 week field work as part of the companion course ANTH 403 for the 1 week experience.
                                                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                    ANTH 407-601 HUMAN EVOLUTION MITCHELL, PAUL W 0530PM-0830PM An examination of fossils and other evidence documenting human evolution. Lectures and readings are supplemented with slide and fossil reproduction materials.
                                                                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                      ANTH 419-401 MINING ARCHAEOLOGY JANSEN, JAN W 0200PM-0500PM In ancient times, materials such as stone and metals were used to produce artifacts including pigments, jewelry, tools, and weapons. This course is designed to introduce students to research on the early exploitation of mineral resources. Which techniques were used to access and process raw materials in antiquity? Which archaeological methods can be used to investigate these features and artifacts? The course will provide worldwide examples through time, ranging from Stone Age flint mining, Iron Age rock salt mining to Medieval silver mining. Ethnographic studies and hands-on activities will contribute to our understanding of mining in archaeology, and artifacts from the Museum's collections will undergo scientific analysis in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials.
                                                                                        ANTH 454-001 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL DATA LYCETT, MARK TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of how to work with and present quantitative data. Topics include graphical display of numerical data, probability, sampling, descriptive and inferential statistics (parametric and non-parametric two-and three group tests, regression and correlation). Using examples drawn from the social sciences and anthropology, the focus is on teaching the logic behind quantitative arguments and statistical tests, rather than on the mathematical formulas, making the course especially relevant for students who do not have a strong background in mathematics. This course fulfills the Colleges Quantitative Data Analysis requirement.
                                                                                          COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                                                          ANTH 514-401 Petrography of Cultural Materials BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE W 1000AM-0100PM Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.
                                                                                            ANTH 527-640 Cultural Heritage and Conflict DANIELS, BRIAN R 0500PM-0800PM Intentional destruction of cultural heritage is designed to erase the presence of a people in history and has become an all too familiar feature of the devastation wrought by contemporary violence and "ethnic cleansing." Recent cases appear frequently in news headlines and include such well-known examples as the 2001 demolition of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, the 2012 destruction of Sufi shrines in Timbuktu, Mali, and the recent obliteration of historic sites across Syria and Iraq. This course explores this phenomenon by examining such questions as: Why is cultural heritage targeted in conflict? Under what circumstances? By whom? In so doing, we will engage with readings that discuss the historical development of the international laws and norms that aim to protect cultural heritage during conflict and examples successful and unsuccessful humanitarian interventions.
                                                                                              ANTH 543-401 PUBLIC ENVIRO HUMANITIES: PUBLIC ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES WIGGIN, BETHANY W 0200PM-0500PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. In spring 2018, participants have the opportunity to participate in PPEH's public engagement projects on urban waters and environmental data. These ongoing projects document the variety of uses that Philadelphians make of federal climateand environmental data, in and beyond city government; they also shine light onclimate and environmental challenges our city faces and the kinds of data we need to address them. Working with five community partners across Philadelphia, including the City's Office of Sustainability, students in this course will develop data use stories and surface the specific environmental questions neighborhoods have and the kinds of data they find useful. The course hosts guest speakers and research partners from related public engagement projects across the planet; community, neighborhood, open data, and open science advocates; and project partners in government in the City of Philadelphia and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Course assignments include: * 2 short-form essays (course blog posts); * a 12-hour research stay (conducted over multiple visits) with a community course partner to canvas data uses and desires; * authorship of 3 multi-media data stories; * co-organization and participation in a city-wide data storytelling event on May 2, 2018.
                                                                                                ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                ANTH 546-401 GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP HALL, KATHLEEN M 0430PM-0630PM This course will examine the concept of global citizenship as well as the challenges of realizing citizenship on a global scale. The course will focus more specifically on dilemmas associated with different approaches to addressing social problems that transcend national boundaries, including: eduational development; human rights; humanitarian aid; free trade; micro-finance initiatives; and the global environment movement. The course has two objectives: to explore research and theoretical work related to global citizenship, social engagement, and international development more generally; and to provide a forum for discussing ethical and practical issues that emerge within transnational social change efforts.
                                                                                                  ANTH 546-402 GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP HALL, KATHLEEN W 0430PM-0630PM This course will examine the concept of global citizenship as well as the challenges of realizing citizenship on a global scale. The course will focus more specifically on dilemmas associated with different approaches to addressing social problems that transcend national boundaries, including: eduational development; human rights; humanitarian aid; free trade; micro-finance initiatives; and the global environment movement. The course has two objectives: to explore research and theoretical work related to global citizenship, social engagement, and international development more generally; and to provide a forum for discussing ethical and practical issues that emerge within transnational social change efforts.
                                                                                                    ANTH 551-301 EXPERIMENTAL ETHNOGRAPHY AT THE INTERFACES OF THE ARTS AND SCIENCES LYONS, KRISTINA T 0130PM-0430PM This course takes inspiration from conversations and practices occurring at the interfaces of cultural anthropology, the environmental humanities, and feminist science studies. Anthropologist Stuart McLean (2017) has asked: "What might become of anthropology if it were to suspend its sometime claims to be a social science? What if it were to turn instead to exploring its affinities with art and literature as a mode of engaged creative practice carried forward in a world heterogeneously composed of humans and other than humans?" At the same time, the emergence of the environmental humanities as an academic discipline in the twenty-first century reflects the growing conviction on the part of diverse sectors that "environmental" problems cannot be solved by science and technology alone. Instead, cultivation of experimental methods and alliance building between the arts and social and natural sciences has become ever more important strategy in terms of fomenting public engaged scholarship. In this course, we will not necessarily suspend the social scientific claims of anthropology, and ethnography more specifically, but we will push our methodological premises and conceptual work to experiment with our objects of study, matters of concern, and the diverse materialities that emerge from and participate in our ethnographic work.
                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                      ANTH 557-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF LANDSCAPES ERICKSON, CLARK TR 0300PM-0430PM Advanced seminar for potential professional archaeologists. Course will examine critically main past and present theoretical issues in archaeological research and interpretation, and consider various methodologies utilized towards these interpretive ends.
                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                        ANTH 564-301 COLONIAL ECOLOGIES LYCETT, MARK
                                                                                                        MORRISON, KATHLEEN
                                                                                                        TR 0130PM-0300PM This seminar explores the historical ecology of European colonial expansion in a comparative framework, concentrating on the production of "periphery" and the transformation of incorporated societies and environments. We begin with a discussion of the theoretical frameworks, sources of evidence, and analytical strategies employed by researchers to address the conjunction of environmental and human history in colonial contexts, including underdevelopment and global systems of circulation; political ecology; and ecological imperialism. We then discuss the circulation of persons, crops, invasives, and microbes as fundamental conditions of emerging global systems. Drawing on these elements, we discuss landscapes as sites of misrecognition, rationalization, and cultural production. This discussion sets the stage for an examination of novel forms of economic and ecological production, including the emergence of the 'drug foods', the transformation of forest products, and the rise of the plantation. We then consider the political ecology of crisis in colonial settings, including agrarian collapse, famine, and 'ecological poverty.'
                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                          ANTH 567-401 LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                                                                          MONGE, JANET
                                                                                                          WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                                                                          TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                                                                            OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                            ANTH 586-601 CULTURE, PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE W 0530PM-0830PM The goal of this course is to understand and to investigate both historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. Reading topics cover both contemporary and scholarly issues in cultural anthropology, popular culture, consumer behavior, off-shore production, social networking, media and communications, financial and real estate markets and marketing. Class distinctions are equally interdisciplinary as we focus on investigating and identifying critical global/local linkages. We analyze the various ways in which Philadelphia and other "global cities" are competing for consumer revenues. We ask what factors have led contemporary society reaching its current stage of mass consumption and how have certain goods and services been reconfigured, packaged or re-packaged to attract new consumers. In order to better understand the link between consumption and production factors we explore the relationship between outsourcing and/or offshore production and modern consumption. Approximately sixty percent of the seminar takes place in the classroom and will include lecture, class discussion, and films. The remaining portion of the class meetings will involve local and regional travel. Research assignments emphasize the use of anthropological participant-observation techniques to investigate the relationships between culture and contemporary mass consumption within the contexts of re-gentrification, urbanization, and globalization.
                                                                                                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                              ANTH 593-640 Natural and Cultural Heritage in Global Perspective DANIELS, BRIAN M 0500PM-0800PM This seminar will explore the ideas surrounding the theories, discourses, and practices surrounding natural and cultural heritage. Heritage has become inscribed in the planning of urban and rural landscapes, designed as tourist destinations, and considered a universal good in global cosmopolitan society. But it would be well to ask: what kind of "nature" and "culture" has been labeled as heritage? What kind of organizations, economics, and politics are necessary to sustain it? How are these put in place? By whom? For whom? Over the course of the semester, students will engage with readings that discuss how cultural and natural heritage is communicated to the public and the relationship between academic critique and pragmatic social engagement. This seminar is further grounded by a partnership between the Penn Cultural Heritage Center and the U.S. Mission to UNESCO focused on the assessment of World Heritage Sites, and students will have the opportunity to learn from and participate in specific case studies.
                                                                                                                ANTH 602-301 EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY SCHURR, THEODORE M 0200PM-0500PM This course will explore various subfields of biological anthropology to better understand what it means to be human. Special attention will be paid to current issues and problems in these subfields, and the different ways in which researchers are attempting to understand and uncover the details of human evolution. Among the areas that are explored in this course are paleoanthropology, primatology, human biology, molecular anthropology, evolutionary medicine, epigenetics, and human life history. Specific issues to be explored include the primate roots of human behavior, brain and language evolution, new fossil hominins, the origins of anatomically modern humans, and modern human migration history.
                                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                  ANTH 617-301 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF CULTURE & SOCIETY PETRYNA, ADRIANA W 0200PM-0500PM A critical examination of recent history and theory in cultural and social anthropology. Topics include structural-functionalism; symbolic anthropology; post-modern theory. Emphasis is on major schools and trends in America, Britain, and France.
                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                    ANTH 619-640 MLA Proseminar: Cultural Diversity and Global Connections HALL, KATHLEEN T 0430PM-0730PM This course considers the intensification of global connections and what anthropologist Anna Tsing has referred to as the "zones of awkward engagement" that emerge within the contemporary global capitalist order. Social problems, such as environmental change, the welfare of refugees, human rights abuses, or poverty in the Global South, have increasingly come to be seen as global issues best solved through multinational or international cooperation. Efforts to address these problems bring together diverse stakeholders, international experts, policy makers, politicians, civil servants, activists, international and local volunteers as well as local people, each interpreting "the problem" from different cultural perspectives and possessing varying degrees of power to affect change. Ethnographic analysis is particularly well suited to examining the diverse and conflicting social interactions, misunderstandings and multiple perspectives, cultural politics and power dynamics that arise locally within these zones of awkward engagement and that ultimately shape the outcomes of social change efforts. The course will emphasize the close and critical reading of ethnographic accounts of a range of social improvement efforts --environmentalist, human rights, refugee relief, and fair trade economic efforts-- across different regions of the world to gain a better understanding of how cultural diversity and power relations shape social interaction within these globalizes zones of awkward engagement. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the nature and practice of ethnographic research and of the challenges faced in engaging globally.
                                                                                                                      ANTH 626-301 INTENSITY CARRUTHERS, ANDREW T 1000AM-0100PM This course examines the manner in which humans encounter the continuous and gradable features of phenomena in social life - sensory qualities of objects, people's aspirations and affect, pitch movement during voiced talk, monsoons and sea breezes, biological growth and environmental degradation, migratory flows in transnational settings - and attempt to evaluate or convert them into discrete dimensions of social life. We examine how intensities and gradients are managed in everyday life as well as in institutional settings - through government policies, scientific protocols, surveillance regimes, infrastructural agendas - and we survey the ways in which everyday and institutional practices reflect and shape each other in societies across the world. In particular, we explore the question of what an anthropology of intensity might look like, and how it may reconfigure approaches to the ethnographic study of human affairs.
                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                        ANTH 633-401 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY MONGE, JANET F 0200PM-0500PM This course will investigate and discuss the various techniques of analysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysis of life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations of forensic anthropology and the application of DNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.
                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                          ANTH 634-401 FEMINIST ETHNOGRAPHY THOMAS, DEBORAH M 0330PM-0630PM This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.
                                                                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                            ANTH 643-640 MLA Proseminar: Globalization and Its Historical Significance SPOONER, BRIAN M 0530PM-0830PM Globalization is one of the most comprehensive topics of our time, and also one of the most controversial. This course assesses the current state of globalization, considering it in terms of economic, political, and cultural change, and follows its progress through the semester. The class will be led through the main topics and debates, introduced to conceptual and empirical tools for framing academic discussion and research about its dynamics, how and when it began, and (most particularly) how it differs from earlier episodes of historical change.
                                                                                                                              ANTH 653-301 SOCIAL THEORY FROM KANT TO DELEUZE AGHA, ASIF R 1000AM-0100PM The course examines the work of 20th century writers like Weber, Bourdieu, Foucault and Deleuze in the light of the intellectual traditions to which they belong, including the work of writers like Kant, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. Particular attention is given to the philosophical roots of the models of society proposed by specific authors and the question of the applicability of such models to ethnographically based anthropological research.
                                                                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                                ANTH 654-401 ANTH & THE MODERN WORLD: AFGHANISTAN, IRAN, AND PAKISTAN SPOONER, BRIAN M 0200PM-0500PM This course relates anthropological models and methods to current problems in the Modern World. The overall objective is to show how the research findings and analytical concepts of anthropology may be used to illuminate and explain events as they have unfolded in the recent news and in the course of the semester. Each edition of the course will focus on a particular country or region that has been in the news.
                                                                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                                  ANTH 661-401 GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY SPOONER, BRIAN T 0500PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                    ANTH 670-301 RESEARCH DESIGN MORRISON, KATHLEEN W 0900AM-1200PM This is a practical course on the challenges of designing research projects in anthropology with a special focus on the dissertation project. We will discuss how to select and refine a topic that is, ideally, important without being impossible. Interesting research can often be described or understood in multiple ways, and we will practice recasting project proposals for different kinds of audiences and formats. We will also consider issues of methodology, or the logic of method. Specific kinds of questions tend to lead to specific field and lab methods, and it is important to match your questions to your ways of answering them. This is not, however, a methods course. If you need to learn ethnography, ceramic analysis, textual analysis or some other set of methods, you should look for specific instruction in that field. Instead, we will consider how to assemble a research project that is well-structured, significant, and feasible using one or more analytical strategies. Research design is critical not only for planning research appropriate to your questions but also serves as the basis for successful proposals. Proposal-writing is a specific genre you will need to master; the final product for this course is therefore a research proposal. We will discuss the format of the proposal in detail. Not all proposals need to follow the same template, but there is a family resemblance to successful proposals; thus, although we will follow advice for writing scientific proposals, more humanistically-oriented students should not find this to be a problem.
                                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                      ANTH 707-401 CRAFT OF ETHNOGRAPHY HALL, KATHLEEN CANCELED This course is designed to follow after Ethnographic Research Methods (EDUC 721). In the introductory course, students learned how to use qualitative methods in conducting a brief field study. This advanced level course focuses on research design and specifically the craft of ethnographic research. Students will apply what they learn in the course in writing a proposal for a dissertation research project.
                                                                                                                                        FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                        ANTH 711-401 METHODOLOGY SEMINAR: HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY MITCHELL, LISA F 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary
                                                                                                                                          ANTH 720-601 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT F 0630PM-0930PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                            ANTH 720-602 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                              ANTH 720-603 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                ANTH 733-301 CAPITALISM, COLLOQUIUM 2018-2019 URBAN, GREGORY
                                                                                                                                                SMIT, DOUGLAS
                                                                                                                                                M 1200PM-0300PM This graduate seminar is a full year course open to second year anthropology graduate students. Other interested students should contact the instructors for permission before enrolling. Topic changes each year, corresponding to the Penn Anthropology Department Colloquium series.
                                                                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION