Courses for Spring 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANTH 001-601 ARCHAEOLOGY: WINDOW TO THE HUMAN PAST FISHMAN, SUSANNAH UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 W 0600PM-0900PM This course will introduce students to the methods and theory of archaeology by exploring how we turn archaeological data into statements about cultural behavior. We will discuss the place of archaeology in the broader field of anthropology and debate issues facing the discipline today. The course will rely on case studies from around the world and from many different time periods to introduce students to the research process, field and lab methods, and essential questions of archaeological anthropology. Students will have the opportunity to work hands-on with archaeological materials through visiting the galleries and working with Penn Museum collections.
    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
    ANTH 002-601 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology BURKE, KEVIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 M 0530PM-0830PM An introduction to the anthropological study of human social and cultural diversity throughout the world, with special emphasis on the development of the idea of culture as an analytical concept. The course includes sections on the ethnographic research method and on the library of ethnographic material relating to cultural change in different parts of the world that anthropology has produced since the 19th century.
      Society sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ANTH 003-601 INTRO TO HUMAN EVOLUTION OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 TR 0700PM-0830PM How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. First we cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and working with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts.
        Living World Sector (all classes) LIVING WORLD SECTOR
        ANTH 004-001 THE MODERN WORLD AND ITS CULTURAL BACKGROUND URBAN, GREGORY UNIVERSITY MUSEUM B17 MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity: ethnicities, religions, languages, political forms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations". Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, in which we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attention to the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context.
          Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ANTH 005-001 GREAT TRANSFORMATIONS MORRISON, KATHLEEN CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 214 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution. Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop? Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, including the landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economic change from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition, students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum during practicums.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
            ANTH 010-401 ARCHAEOLOGY & TECHNOLOGY COBB, PETER UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 T 0430PM-0730PM This seminar explores how humans apply and modify technologies in contexts as diverse as everyday life, major politico-economic undertakings, or scholarly research. We investigate this through a comparison of technologies of the past with technologies of the present used to study the past. We will dig into the details of topics like building pyramids and tombs, the function of ancient astronomical devices, pre-telegraph long-distance communication, tools for cutting and carving stone, and kilns for firing pottery. Archaeologists study these issues by examining the material remains of past societies: the cut-marks on stone blocks, extant tomb structures, the debris of manufacturing activities, and much more. Today's technologies enable the detailed scientific examination of the evidence, improving our understanding of the past. Thus, in parallel with our investigation of past technologies, we will also study the history of the application of present technologies to research on the archaeological record. We will dig into topics like the first uses of computers and databases, the development of statistical methods, early digital 3d modeling of objects and architecture, the adoption of geophysical prospection and geographic information systems, and the emerging uses of machine learning. In some cases, we can even compare old and new technologies directly, such as with land measurement and surveying techniques. Throughout the class we will engage in readings and discussions on the theory of humans and technology, to gain a better understanding of how processes such as innovation function in all time periods.
              FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
              ANTH 022-401 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES SYKES, JAMES LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 101 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ANTH 022-402 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES ZHANG, SHELLEY LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 101 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ANTH 022-403 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES CAVICCHI, ELISE LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 102 MWF 1200PM-0100PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ANTH 022-404 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES BYNUM, ELIZABETH LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 101 MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                      ANTH 063-401 EAST&WEST:A HITCHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE MODERN WORLD MITCHELL, LISA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419 MW 1100AM-1200PM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world.
                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                        ANTH 086-301 Desire and Demand DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 M 0200PM-0500PM Does consumption shape culture or does culture shape consumption? As even the most mundane purchase becomes socially symbolic and culturally meaningful we can persuasively argue that the concept of "need" has been transformed. Analyzing a variety of physical and virtual consumer venues, the goal of this seminar is to understand and to analyze historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. We investigate social and political-economic factors that impact when and how people purchase goods and argue that behavior attached to consumption includes a nexus of influences that may change periodically in response to external factors. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and require a critical analysis of global/local linkages. The city of Philadelphia becomes the seminar's laboratory as we ask: how have issues of culture, consumption, and global capitalism become intertwined around the world?
                          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; FOR FRESHMEN ONLY; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                          ANTH 105-601 HUMAN ADAPTATION MITCHELL, PAUL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 W 0530PM-0830PM This course concerns evolutionary processes using humans (Homo sapiens) as a case study. Through a study of the anatomical, genetic, and behavioral adaptations in our species, we will explain and explore our biology through mammalian, primate, and hominid evolutionary histories. Through evolutionary theory, we explore why humans are imperfectly adapted and not an end product of evolutionary change, and how we create and modify, not just respond to, evolutionary pressures. Through this approach, we gain insights into how and why our biology functions (and sometimes malfunctions) in the way that it does. Then, we will explore topics including human birth, growth, locomotion, reproduction, and diet as part of human biocultural adaptation. This course will involve the analysis of hominid fossil casts and human skeletal material from the Penn Museum Physical Anthropology section.
                            ANTH 108-401 PASTORAL NOMADISM HAMMER, EMILY COLLEGE HALL 311A TR 1030AM-1200PM Pastoral nomadism is a "third way" of human subsistence separate from farming and foraging. It is a sustainable human adaptation to grassland and arid environments practiced through particular technologies and domesticated animals. This course begins by examining the human ecology and social organization that emerge from mobile ways of life, drawing on modern, ethnographic, and archaeological examples of pastoral nomadic groups in the Middle East and Central Asia. Academic readings and ethnographic films will form the basis of discussions about several larger themes, including: the origins of pastoral nomadism and horse riding; the development of dairy-based foods and human adaptations allowing the digestion of lactose; the historical relationship between mobile groups of pastoralists and territorial states; popular perceptions of nomads in various forms of historical and modern media; and the influence of ideas about nomads on modern senses of heritage and nationalism in the Middle East and Central Asia.
                              ANTH 122-001 BECOMING HUMAN MONGE, JANET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM B17 TR 0130PM-0300PM Human evolutionary studies is a composite product of the fieldwork of both Paleolithic archaeology and human paleontology (or what we refer to as "stones and bones"). This marriage of two subdisciplines of anthropology produces a unique set of data that is intellectually managed and driven by theories within anthropology as a whole and even beyond -- to fields such as biology, psychology, and primate ethology, as we try to understand the origins of language, culture, and our unique physical characteristics. In this course, we will jointly discuss and debate the actual evidence of human evolution, describing what the actual evidence is and exploring how far can we take these interpretations.
                                Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                                ANTH 123-001 COMMUNICATION & CULTURE AGHA, ASIF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 MW 1000AM-1100AM The course looks at varieties of human expression -- such as art, film, language and song -- as communicative practices that connect persons together to form a common culture. Discussion is centered around particular case studies and ethnographic examples. Examination of communicative practices in terms of the types of expressive signs they employ, their capacity to formulate and transmit cultural beliefs and ideals (such as conceptions of politics, nature, and self), and to define the size and characteristics of groups and communities sharing such ideals. Discussion of the role of media, social institutions, and technologies of communication (print, electronic). Emphasis on contemporary communicative practices and the forms of culture that emerge in the modern world.
                                  Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
                                  ANTH 143-001 BEING HUMAN: BIOLOGY, CULTURE, & HUMAN DIVERSITY HOKE, MORGAN HAYDEN HALL 358 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will investigate human biology from evolutionary and biocultural perspectives. Using this approach, the class will explore what it means to be human. We will examine humans as mammals, as primates, and as hominins (our own lineage). We will also study the basics of human genetics, growth and development, immune function, nutrition, life history, and adaptations to diet and disease. In addition, we will review biological variation in contemporary and past societies and the evolutionary processes that helped to shape them.
                                    ANTH 153-001 GIFTS, COMMODITIES, AND THE MARKET: ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE ECONOMY SMIT, DOUGLAS UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 0130PM-0300PM What is the difference between a farmer's market in West Philadelphia and a bazaar in Cairo? What is the meaning of a gift between friends? What about gifts between enemies? What are the origins, meaning, and purpose of money? What is the relationship between politics and the economy? This course will begin to answer these questions by introducing the field of economic anthropology. The economy is not an isolated phenomenon: it is interconnected with socio-cultural and political factors, thus challenging our conception of what is truly considered to be economic. By highlighting the cultural diversity of economic systems across time and space, including our own contemporary, global economy, students will learn what can be considered natural about the economy, and what is contingent on historical factors of culture, society, or politics. Prior economic coursework is not required, nor will this course entail much quantitative analysis. This is not a course in traditional economics or finance. Instead, we will examine socio-cultural, historical, and biological aspects of different economic arrangements, and discuss how anthropological approaches to the economy draw from larger theoretical perspectives (e.g. Smithian, Marxian, Polanyian, Austrian, etc) Case studies will vary widely and include topics such as gift-giving economies of the South Pacific, power and redistribution of the European Bronze Age, social relationships among 21st century Wall-Street traders, and many others that highlight the diversity of economic practices among human societies. Students will be evaluated on short written responses to readings, a midterm and non-cumulative final exam, and a research paper.
                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                      ANTH 159-401 POPULATION AND PUBLIC HEALTH IN EASTERN EUROPE GHODSEE, KRISTEN MCNEIL BUILDING 409 TR 1030AM-1200PM Since the collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe (and 1991 in the Soviet Union), many of the countries in the region have experienced public health crises and demographic catastrophe. Below replacement fertility rates and massive out migration have decimated the populations of these countries even as populations age and place unsustainable strains on pension systems and medical services. The demographic collapse has also been accompanied by falling male life expectancy and the rise of alcoholism, depression, domestic violence, and suicide. The economic exigencies of the transition from communism to capitalism dismantled welfare states at the exact moment when health services were most needed, leaving charities and nongovernmental organization to try to fill in the gaps. Through a combination of readings from the fields of epidemiology, demography, and medical anthropology, this course examines the public health implications of poverty and social dislocation in post-communist states. All readings and assignments are in English.
                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                        ANTH 189-401 ISLAM AND THE WEST SEVEA, TERENJIT WILLIAMS HALL 306 MW 0200PM-0330PM How did Muslims and modern South Asia interact with the West? What Islamic idioms, orientations and movements emerged in the nineteenth and twentienth centuries? Was South Asia a prominent global center of Islam? What kinds of Islamic educational institutions developed in modern South Asia? How did Muslims appropriate technologies? What materials were printed by Muslims? Were Muslims part of the British army? What was jihad in modernity? How did Muslim 'modernists' and 'traditionalists' respond to the challenges of colonialism and modernity? What was the nature of Sufism in modern South Asia? What was the nature of politicalIslam in South Asia? How did some Muslims demand a Muslim State? What was the Partition? How has Muslim history been remembered in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan? This is an introductory course, and aims to introduce students to a facet of the long history of Islam, Muslims, and the West.
                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                          ANTH 207-401 PRIMATE BEHAVIOR AND ECOLOGY O'CONNELL, CAITLIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course explores the behavior of wild primates and the ecological models that attempt to explain the evolution of these behaviors. The evolution and taxonomy of primates will be reviewed, followed by a brief history of wild primate studies. We will then explore primate behavior through theoretical frameworks ranging from socioecological theory to sexual selection. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, socioecology, aggression, kinship, cooperation, reproductive strategies, cognition, and conservation. Those enrolled in 507 will have additional responsibilities assigned.
                                            ANTH 213-601 LOCAL BIOLOGIES JOINER, MICHAEL CANCELED This seminar explores anthropological perspectives on the interactions between biological and cultural systems. The goal of the seminar is to move beyond human experience as symbolic construction, and to understand how biology and pathology are expressed through and embedded in social relations and experience. We consider recent classificatory shifts in the sciences of human nature, the vexed dynamic between objectivity and uncertainty, and the ways in which scientific knowledge informs moral categories and social thought. Topics include the placebo response in sociosomatic medicine; the anthropology of the human life-span; biological anthropological perspectives on health and behavior; the uses of racial classification in medicine; eugenics, the new genetics; biotechnology in the context of epidemics and inequalities; and the role of anthropology in bioethics.
                                              ANTH 220-601 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 F 0630PM-0930PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                ANTH 220-602 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                  ANTH 220-603 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                    ANTH 230-401 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY COX, SAMANTHA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will investigate and discuss the various techniques of analysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysis of life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations of forensic anthropology and the application of DNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.
                                                      ANTH 234-601 PHARMA & GLOBAL HEALTH JOINER, MICHAEL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 T 0530PM-0830PM In some parts of the world, spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people do not have access to basic or life-saving drugs. Individuals struggle to afford medications; whole populations are neglected, considered too poor to constitute profitable markets for the development and distribution of necessary drugs. This seminar analyzes the dynamics of the burgeoning international pharmaceutical trade and the global inequalities that emerge from and are reinforced by market-driven medicine. Questions about who will be treated and who will not filter through every phase of pharmaceutical production --from preclinical research to human testing, marketing, distribution, prescription, and consumption. Whether considering how the pharmaceutical industry shapes popular understandings of mental illness in North America and Great Britain, how Brazil has created a model of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment program, or how the urban pooer in Delhi understand and access healthcare, the seminar draws on anthropological case studies to illuminate the roles of corporations, governments, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in relation to global pharmaceuticals. As we analyze each case and gain famliarity with tehnographic methods, we will ask how individual and group health is shaped by new medical technologies and their evolving regulatory regimes and markets. The course familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes; and it contributes to ethical and political debates on the development and access to new medical technologies.
                                                        ANTH 253-401 VIOLENCE, TOLERANCE, AND FREEDOM THOMAS, JOLYON CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 MW 0330PM-0500PM This seminar examines how the adjective "religious" has been used to modify the nouns "violence," "tolerance," and "freedom." It traces the historical development of liberal ideas of tolerance and human rights, interrogates the common assumption that religion exerts a perverse influence on politics and vice versa, critically examines the concept of terrorism, and connects the neoliberal ideal of unfettered free markets to the idea of being "spiritual but not religious."
                                                          ANTH 260-301 CULTURES OF SCIENCE&TECH PETRYNA, ADRIANA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 M 0200PM-0500PM Science and technology figure centrally in the economic, political, and socio-cultural changes that impact our worlds. Happenings in the life sciences, including the discovery of new genes, pathways, and processes, are redrawing concepts of the body and human nature and refiguring social and political relations. The seminar starts from the premise that scientific facts are made, not things existing a priori in the world and that are merely picked up by researchers and consumed by lay audiences. Likewise, technologies are created through a process of intense negotiation between producers and their sophisticated users. Focusing on the biosciences, we explore the production of science and technology and how they 1)affect individuals, self-identities, subjectivity, kinship, and social relationships; 2)have interacted with or reinforced political programs, racial classifications, unequal access to knowledge, and patterns of social injustice; 3)inform contemporary institutional structures, strategies of governance, and practices of citizenship. We will combine methods and perspectives from social and cultural anthropology, and the social studies of science and technology, and will draw from historical case studies, contemporary ethnographies of science, scientific and medical journals, documentary films and media reports.
                                                            BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                            ANTH 267-401 LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MONGE, JANET
                                                            MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                            WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                            UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                              OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                              ANTH 277-401 COLONIAL OBJECTS, COMMODITIES, BODIES: ARCH OF LATIN AMERICA SINCE 1492 SMIT, DOUGLAS UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 TR 1030AM-1200PM In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, unleashing five centuries of conquest and colonialism that continues to influence contemporary Latin America. This course examines the archaeology of the colonial encounter between Spanish/Portuguese and indigenous peoples of the Americas. Students will learn how to incorporate material evidence with archival approaches to colonial history, using archaeology to understand the roles of social groups often overlooked by colonial archives (e.g. indigenous peoples, women, Afro-Latin Americans). In short, this course will be a material history of colonialism from below, focusing on the conflicts and negotiations over material culture, economic systems, religion, and biology. No prior knowledge of archaeology or Latin American history is required. The course readings will balance secondary historical readings with archaeology articles on similar topics, in order to highlight the benefits of a material culture approach to the colonial encounter in Latin America. However, the course will mainly focus on the experiences, responses, and negotiation of conquest and colonization by indigenous societies in Latin American. Regional coverage will include Spanish colonialism in the Caribbean (Taino), Mexico (Aztec), Central America (Mayan), Andean South America (Inka), as well as Portuguese incursions in Brazil. Students will be evaluated on short written responses to readings, a midterm and non-cumulative final exam, and a research paper.
                                                                ANTH 282-401 A History of Films By and About Native Americans POWELL, TIMOTHY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course will examine films by and about Native Americans. From the very beginnings of film history, Native Americans have been a centrally important subject. While much of the writing about Native American films tends to focus on the perpetuation of stereotypes, this class will concentrate on four primarythemes: 1) the role that film plays in helping the audience to understand the exceedingly complex place of indigenous people in "American" identity (with "American" signifying, in this instance, a hemispheric sense of identity); 2) the myriad of ways that indigenous people have been involved in the history of film as extras, actors, directors, producers; 3) how representations changed when Native Americans took control of production; 4) the ways in which films by and about Native Americans have helped to heal the historical trauma resulting from the "Indian Wars" that have gone on for 500+ years on the North American continent.
                                                                  ANTH 288-601 Myths, Fraud and Science in Archaeology HARDY, THOMAS UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 R 0530PM-0830PM This course is intended to examine the distinctions between scientific and non-scientific approaches in archaeology. It is designed for people with a genuine interest in learning what archaeology is really all about, and who wish to critically evaluate the many different accounts about the past in order to make decisions for themselves as to what may be reliable or unreliable information. The course will analyze a variety of case studies derived from both the archaeological and pseudo-archaeological literature in order to define criteria for evaluating the accuracy and reliability to these accounts.
                                                                    ANTH 292-401 BIOARCHAEOLOGY OF THE PEOPLES OF THE PAST MONGE, JANET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 F 0200PM-0500PM This class introduces the field of bioarchaeology, the study of human remains in archaeological contexts, and is designed specifically for the reconstruction of the lifeways of peoples in the past. The focus of the course is on the population (rather than on the individual) level and covers much of human history and prehistory through a series of case studies. Using the basic techniques of analysis of the human skeleton, and in recognition of the dynamic nature of bone as it responds to changes in the environment, population parameters can be used to understand the efficacy of humans, both biologically and culturally, to respond to the ever changing physical environments of the globe.
                                                                      ANTH 297-401 NATURE CULTURE ENVIRONMENTALISM: URBAN WATER ANAND, NIKHIL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 TR 1030AM-1200PM In Spring 2018, this course is specially designed to appeal to students with interests in urban studies and environmental studies across different disciplines. We will explore the natures, cultures and environmentalisms of cities by exploring the matter of urban water. Cities have long been made through historic projects to tame the unruly relations between land and water. As the catastrophic human disasters in Houston, Florida and Puerto Rico have recently shown, these relations are today everywhere being unsettled and exacerbated by climate change. In cities as diverse as Philadelphia and Mumbai, climate change promises to exacerbate social inequalities and further squeeze non-human natures. How is the urban environment produced, magnified, divided and shrunk with water? In these times, how might we make space for social justice and non-human natures in and along rising urban waters? This course is the first of a two-course sequence on urban waters and climate change, and is part of Rising Waters, a comparative research project in the Environmental Humanities. The course will feature field trips in Philadelphia, as well as guest lectures by urban professionals, environmental experts and activists. Students successfully completing the course will have the opportunity to apply to travel to India in December 2018 to conduct original research with their peers in Philadelphia and Mumbai.
                                                                        BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                        ANTH 303-301 RESEARCH METHODS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY SUESS, GRETCHEN CANCELED This undergraduate seminar is about how ethnographers do research. It introduces fundamental concepts and techniques - research design, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, field notes, archives, data collection and analysis. It also addresses ethical and legal issues- cultural protocols, intellectual property rights, collaborative anthropology, and institutional review boards. Students will conduct original ethnographic research in partnership with the Netter Center.
                                                                          AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                                                          ANTH 307-401 CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICANS BRUCHAC, MARGARET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course examines the social and political lives of contemporary Native American Indians in the United States and Canada. Topics include: Indigenous identity; homelands and natural resources; popular culture and media; Indigenous arts and cultural expression; museum representations; athletics; gender relations; tribal recognition and sovereignty; and resistance movements. We will consider the origins of federal programs and legislation that have become essential to the protection of Native American freedoms. Students can expect to gain an appreciation of the complexity and cultural diversity of Native communities and tribal nations and insights into their interactions with other cultures over time.
                                                                            CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                            ANTH 328-001 PERFORMING CULTURE BRUCHAC, MARGARET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 W 0200PM-0500PM This course analyzes cultural performances as sites for the formation, expression, and transmission of social identity. Students will read ethnographies, critiques, and reports of performance genres including ritual, theater, music, dance, art, and spoken word, with a particular focus on Native American and Indigenous arts and expressions. Topics include: expressive culture as survivance; debates around authenticity and invented traditions; public identity and sexuality; political resistance; the effects of globalization; transnationalism and hybridity; cultural appropriation; and the transformation of folk performances in the wake of modern media.
                                                                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                              ANTH 329-401 PSYC&ANTH PERSP ON CHILD: PSYCHOANALYTIC AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHILDHOOD BLUM, LAWRENCE
                                                                              SHAPIRO, BARBARA
                                                                              UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 T 0300PM-0600PM This course will consider the interaction between culture and individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. Through through an examination of phases of human development described by psychoanalysis, and evidence concerning psychoanalytic ideas from around the world, we will consider questions such as: How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How do we develop emotionally? What features are and are not universal for our species? What is and is not known about these questions. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist, one a pediatrician. This course counts towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor.
                                                                                ANTH 331-301 HISTORICAL ECOLOGY ERICKSON, CLARK UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 0300PM-0430PM The relationship between the human beings and the environment is complex, dynamic, and contentious. Historical ecology addresses this relationship over the long term through the physical signatures and patterns of past human activity that are embedded in landscape. In some preindustrial cases, humans caused environmental degradation and societal collapse. In other situations, people transformed, created, and managed resources for sustainable lifeways over centuries and increased biodiversity. This seminar will examine the Myth of the Ecologically Noble Savage, the Myth of the Pristine Environment, domestication of landscape, biocultural diversity, the alliance between native peoples and Green Politics, and the contribution of past societies to appropriate technology, sustainable development, and biodiversity through the historical, ethnographic, and archaeological record.
                                                                                  ANTH 332-301 MEDICINE AND THE LANGUAGE OF PAIN CLAPP, JUSTIN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4E9 T 0400PM-0700PM Pain can be a particularly complex and morally charged object of biomedicine. The interiority of pain- the deeply private nature of pain experience- complicates its communication. Pain, particularly its chronic form, defies purely biological explanation, troubling fundamental biomedical distinctions between mind and body, subject and object. And decisions about analgesia are fraught, as doctors and patients pursue relief from pain amidst a widespread epidemic of opiate abuse that infuses their interaction with concerns about addiction, drug seeking, culpability, and responsibility. This seminar seeks to shed light on these issues by using concepts from linguistic and medical anthropology to explore how we experience, think about, and talk about pain. As an interdisciplinary endeavor, the course is of relevance not only to anthropology but also to medical sociology, medical ethics, public health, health policy, and science and technology studies.
                                                                                    ANTH 346-401 GIS DIG HUM SOC SCI HAMMER, EMILY DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB PC-L1 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course introduces students to theory and methodology of the geospatial humanities and social sciences, understood broadly as the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and spatial analysis techniques to the study of social and cultural patterns in the past and present. By engaging with spatial theory, spatial analysis case studies, and technical methodologies, students will develop an understanding of the questions driving, and tools available for, humanistic and social science research projects that explore change over space and time. We will use ESRI's ArcGIS software to visualize, analyze, and integrate historical, anthropological, and environmental data. Techniques will be introduced through the discussion of case studies and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory sessions, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.
                                                                                      ANTH 347-301 ANTH OF CORPORATIONS NEWBERRY, DEREK UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 T 0300PM-0600PM Modern business corporations can be characterized as having their own internal cultures, more or less distinct from one another. They also exist within encompassing cultures and cultural flows. At the same time, corporations are producers and disseminators, and thus have effects on their surrounding environments, effects that extend from the local to the global. This course examines modern corporations from these three perspectives through theoretical and ethnographic readings, guest speakers from the corporate world, and independent research conducted by the students. Course requirements include student presentations of their research and readings; one or more take-home exams; and a final research paper.
                                                                                        BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                        ANTH 355-101 MAPPING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE COHEN, RACHEL DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB PC-L1 W 0200PM-0400PM Maps have been used for purposes as varied as imperial exploration, territorial demarcation, state governance, and personal navigation. While they are often discussed as representations of the world, they also help to produce that world. In this course, we will focus on the productive capacity of maps, both theoretically and practically. With regard to theory, we will explore maps imbrication in the projects of capitalism and colonialism; their role in the creation of new socio-spatial relations; and their ability to mobilize political commitments. We will linger in particular on how maps have helped to document and generate global cities, and on the material and symbolic dimensions of digital maps as compared to analog ones. With regard to practice, we will learn the technical skills necessary to produce our own digital maps (using ArcGIS), and work collaboratively with a Philadelphia-based social justice organization to design and address a research question using our GIS skills. Students will leave the class having developed a critical and historical perspective on mapmaking, mastered technical skills in ArcGIS, and designed and executed a GIS project with a local social justice organization. The course is intended for students who are interested in: a) the politics of representing and creating space and place; and b) expanding their technical toolkit to see how digital methods like GIS can (and cant) be used in the service of social justice. Class will meet twice a week: one 90-minute seminar and one 120-minute GIS lab (we will work with ArcGIS and Esri Story Maps). No prior knowledge of GIS is necessary. This course counts for the Digital Humanities minor.
                                                                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                          ANTH 355-301 MAPPING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE POGGIALI, LISA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 M 0200PM-0330PM Maps have been used for purposes as varied as imperial exploration, territorial demarcation, state governance, and personal navigation. While they are often discussed as representations of the world, they also help to produce that world. In this course, we will focus on the productive capacity of maps, both theoretically and practically. With regard to theory, we will explore maps imbrication in the projects of capitalism and colonialism; their role in the creation of new socio-spatial relations; and their ability to mobilize political commitments. We will linger in particular on how maps have helped to document and generate global cities, and on the material and symbolic dimensions of digital maps as compared to analog ones. With regard to practice, we will learn the technical skills necessary to produce our own digital maps (using ArcGIS), and work collaboratively with a Philadelphia-based social justice organization to design and address a research question using our GIS skills. Students will leave the class having developed a critical and historical perspective on mapmaking, mastered technical skills in ArcGIS, and designed and executed a GIS project with a local social justice organization. The course is intended for students who are interested in: a) the politics of representing and creating space and place; and b) expanding their technical toolkit to see how digital methods like GIS can (and cant) be used in the service of social justice. Class will meet twice a week: one 90-minute seminar and one 120-minute GIS lab (we will work with ArcGIS and Esri Story Maps). No prior knowledge of GIS is necessary. This course counts for the Digital Humanities minor.
                                                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                            ANTH 359-401 NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY HOKE, MORGAN STITELER HALL B26 TR 0300PM-0430PM This course will explore the significance as it relates to food behaviors and nutritional status in contemporary human populations. The topics covered will be examined from a biocultural perspective and include 1) definition and functions of nutrients and how different cultures perceive nutrients, 2) basic principles of human growth and development, 3) methods to assess dietary intake, 4) food taboos, 5) feeding practices of infants and children, 6) food marketing, 7) causes and consequences of under- and over-nutrition, and 8) food insecurity and hunger.
                                                                                              ANTH 364-301 DISPOSABILITY: ANTHROPOLOGY IN A WORLD OF WASTE DOHERTY, JACOB CANCELED Waste is all around us. A product of everyday life, of economic activity, of regimes of bodily care and hygiene, waste is an inescapable aspect of modern life and a central element in the constitution of cultural difference. What does the world look like from the vantage point of its diverse waste streams? Taking up classic and contemporary anthropological approaches to waste, the course asks where is "away" when we throw things away? How does the production, disposal, and management of waste contribute to the construction of social differences of race, class, and gender? We examine disposability as a simultaneously material and social phenomena, considering the cultural history, environmental impacts, and economic afterlives of disposable consumer goods and analyzing the historical processes, social institutions, and cultural formations that render certain lives, bodies, populations and environments disposable.
                                                                                                ANTH 386-601 CULTURE, PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 W 0530PM-0830PM The goal of this course is to understand and to investigate both historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. Reading topics cover both contemporary and scholarly issues in cultural anthropology, popular culture, consumer behavior, off-shore production, social networking, media and communications, financial and real estate markets and marketing. Class distinctions are equally interdisciplinary as we focus on investigating and identifying critical global/local linkages. We analyze the various ways in which Philadelphia and other "global cities" are competing for consumer revenues. We ask what factors have led contemporary society reaching its current stage of mass consumption and how have certain goods and services been reconfigured, packaged or re-packaged to attract new consumers. In order to better understand the link between consumption and production factors we explore the relationship between outsourcing and/or offshore production and modern consumption. Approximately sixty percent of the seminar takes place in the classroom and will include lecture, class discussion, and films. The remaining portion of the class meetings will involve local and regional travel. Research assignments emphasize the use of anthropological participant-observation techniques to investigate the relationships between culture and contemporary mass consumption within the contexts of re-gentrification, urbanization, and globalization.
                                                                                                  CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                  ANTH 402-301 RSRCH SKILLS GLBL HLTH: APPLIED RESEARCH SKILLS IN GLOBAL COMMUNITY HEALTH BREAM, KENT HARNWELL COLLEGE HOUSE M10 W 0200PM-0500PM While political borders remain, social and human borders fall with the increasing movement of people, ideas, and resources across geographies. What is global becomes local. While biomedical and counting sciences advance, the human experience and influence remain core to understanding behavior, beliefs, and awareness. What is human remains paramount. The Maya Western Highlands of Guatemala are undergoing health changes (trauma, maternal-infant health, diabetes, mental health) through economic development and continued human migration to and from the US. The Cobbs Creek neighborhood in West Philadelphia is also facing epidemics of non-communicable diseases. In this context, Applied Skills in Global Community Health will provide academic and professional skills development in comparing the role of culture, history and politics in the health of a population in transition (demographic, nutritional, epidemiologic, economic) in both settings. Classroom work will occur in the spring of each year combined with a short (1 wk) field experience in the Western Highlands of Guatemala. In addition students will examine health and community research in the Cobbs Creek neighborhood of West Philadelphia. Students may substitute 10 week field work as part of the companion course ANTH 403 for the 1 week experience.
                                                                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                    ANTH 415-001 ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANIMALS MOORE, KATHERINE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course introduces the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Faunal analysis is an interdisciplinary science which draws methods from archaeology, biology, and paleontology. Bones, shells, and other remains yield evidence for the use of animals by humans, and evidence for the biology of animals and for past environments. The course will focus on research approaches to important transitions in human-animal relationships: the development of human hunting and fishing, animal domestication, early pastoralism, and the emergence of market economies in animal products. Class presentations will include lectures and discussion concerning research design and archaeological case material, with additional videos, slidework with field and laboratory equipment, and supervised work identifying and describing archaeological materials from the University Museum's collections. This class is taught in the Zooarchaeology Laboratory of the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials
                                                                                                      CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                                                                      ANTH 435-401 THE PAST PRESERVED: CONSERVATION IN ARCHAEOLOGY GRANT, LYNN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 0300PM-0430PM This course explores the scientific conservation of cultural materials from archaeological contexts. It is intended to familiarize students with the basics of artifact conservation but is not intended to train them as conservators. The course will cover how various materials interact with their deposit environments; general techniques for on-site conservation triage and retrieval of delicate materials; what factors need to be considered in planning for artifact conservation; and related topics. Students should expect to gain a thorough understanding of the role of conservation in archaeology and how the two fields interact.
                                                                                                        ANTH 447-401 HUMAN REPRODUCTIVE ECOLOGY O'CONNELL, CAITLIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 W 0200PM-0500PM This course explores the processes that regulate fertility in human populations. We adopt an evolutionary perspective to examine the factors that have shaped human reproductive physiology and contribute to variation in reproductive parameters between populations. The biology of menarche, ovarian cycling, pregnancy, lactation, fetal loss, and menopause will be reviewed and the ecological and social factors that influence these steps in the reproductive process will be considered.
                                                                                                          ANTH 461-401 GLOBAL FOOD SECURITY GALLIGAN, DAVID VETERINARY SCHOOL B101 T 0500PM-0800PM This is an interdisciplinary course on the problems of food demand and consumption, production and supply in our increasingly globalized and urbanizing world. Special attention will be given to the intersections of current technologies of food production, current nutritional problems, environmental change and resource degradation, and the changing quality of human social life under globalization. Where and how will sufficient nutritious food be produced sustainably and how can the politics and economics of equitable distribution in such large urban populations be achieved? (Previously ANTH 561)
                                                                                                            ANTH 507-401 PRIMATE BEHAVIOR AND ECOLOGY O'CONNELL, CAITLIN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course explores the behavior of wild primates and the ecological models that attempt to explain the evolution of these behaviors. The evolution and taxonomy of primates will be reviewed, followed by a brief history of wild primate studies. We will then explore primate behavior through theoretical frameworks ranging from socioecological theory to sexual selection. Topics discussed include, but are not limited to, socioecology, aggression, kinship, cooperation, reproductive strategies, cognition, and conservation. Those enrolled in 507 will have additional responsibilities assigned.
                                                                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                              ANTH 508-401 CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES AND LANDSCAPES MATERO, FRANK
                                                                                                              ERICKSON, CLARK
                                                                                                              W 0200PM-0500PM Archaeological sites and landscapes have long been considered places of historical and cultural significance and symbols of national and ethnic identity. More recently they have offered new opportunities for economic and touristic development in both urban and rural settings. With a unique set of physical conditions including fragmentation, illegibility, extreme environmental exposure and material deterioration, as well as contested ownership and control, their conservation, management, and interpretation as heritage places require special knowledge and methodologies for both heritage specialists and archaeologists. This seminar will address the history, theories, principles, and practices of the preservation and interpretation of archaeological sites and landscapes. The course will draw from a wide range of published material and experiences representing both national and international contexts. Topics will include site and landscape documentation and recording; site formation and degradation; intervention strategies including interpretation and display, legislation, policy, and contemporary issues of descendent community ownership and global heritage. The course will be organized as a seminar incorporating readings, lectures and discussions on major themes defining the subject of ruins and archaeological site conservation. Readings have been selected to provide exposure to seminal works in the development of theory and method as well as current expressions of contemporary practice. This will set the background for the selected case study site which will provide students the opportunity to work with primary and secondary materials related to archaeological and ruin sites: excavation reports, stabilization work, conservation and interpretation plans, etc. Students will study specific issues leading toward the critique or development of a conservation and management program in accordance with guidelines established by UNESCO/ICOMOS/ICAHM and other organizations. This year the course site will be FORT UNION NATIONAL MONUMENT, NM.
                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                ANTH 514-401 Petrography of Cultural Materials BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 169 W 1000AM-0100PM Introduction to thin-section petrography of stone and ceramic archaeological materials. Using polarized light microscopy, the first half of this course will cover the basics of mineralogy and the petrography of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. The second half will focus on the petrographic description of ceramic materials, mainly pottery, with emphasis on the interpretation of provenance and technology. As part of this course, students will characterize and analyze archaeological samples from various collections. Prior knowledge of geology is not required.
                                                                                                                  ANTH 527-640 Cultural Heritage and Conflict DANIELS, BRIAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 R 0500PM-0800PM Intentional destruction of cultural heritage is designed to erase the presence of a people in history and has become an all too familiar feature of the devastation wrought by contemporary violence and "ethnic cleansing." Recent cases appear frequently in news headlines and include such well-known examples as the 2001 demolition of the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan, the 2012 destruction of Sufi shrines in Timbuktu, Mali, and the recent obliteration of historic sites across Syria and Iraq. This course explores this phenomenon by examining such questions as: Why is cultural heritage targeted in conflict? Under what circumstances? By whom? In so doing, we will engage with readings that discuss the historical development of the international laws and norms that aim to protect cultural heritage during conflict and examples successful and unsuccessful humanitarian interventions.
                                                                                                                    ANTH 529-401 PSYCHOANALYTIC AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES ON CHILDHOOD BLUM, LAWRENCE
                                                                                                                    SHAPIRO, BARBARA
                                                                                                                    UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 T 0300PM-0600PM This course will consider the interaction between culture and individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. Through through an examination of phases of human development described by psychoanalysis, and evidence concerning psychoanalytic ideas from around the world, we will consider questions such as: How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How do we develop emotionally? What features are and are not universal for our species? What is and is not known about these questions. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist, one a pediatrician. This course counts towards the Psychoanalytic Studies (PSYS) Minor.
                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                      ANTH 543-401 PUBLIC ENVIRO HUMANITIES: PUBLIC ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES WIGGIN, BETHANY WILLIAMS HALL 28 W 0200PM-0500PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. In spring 2018, participants have the opportunity to participate in PPEH's public engagement projects on urban waters and environmental data. These ongoing projects document the variety of uses that Philadelphians make of federal climateand environmental data, in and beyond city government; they also shine light onclimate and environmental challenges our city faces and the kinds of data we need to address them. Working with five community partners across Philadelphia, including the City's Office of Sustainability, students in this course will develop data use stories and surface the specific environmental questions neighborhoods have and the kinds of data they find useful. The course hosts guest speakers and research partners from related public engagement projects across the planet; community, neighborhood, open data, and open science advocates; and project partners in government in the City of Philadelphia and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Course assignments include: * 2 short-form essays (course blog posts); * a 12-hour research stay (conducted over multiple visits) with a community course partner to canvas data uses and desires; * authorship of 3 multi-media data stories; * co-organization and participation in a city-wide data storytelling event on May 2, 2018.
                                                                                                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                        ANTH 546-401 GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP HALL, KATHLEEN EDUCATION BUILDING 200 T 1200PM-0200PM This course will examine the concept of global citizenship as well as the challenges of realizing citizenship on a global scale. The course will focus more specifically on dilemmas associated with different approaches to addressing social problems that transcend national boundaries, including: eduational development; human rights; humanitarian aid; free trade; micro-finance initiatives; and the global environment movement. The course has two objectives: to explore research and theoretical work related to global citizenship, social engagement, and international development more generally; and to provide a forum for discussing ethical and practical issues that emerge within transnational social change efforts.
                                                                                                                          ANTH 547-401 ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION POSECZNICK, ALEXANDER CANCELED An introduction to the intent, approach, and contribution of anthropology to the study of socialization and schooling in cross-cultural perspective. Education is examined in traditional, colonial, and complex industrial societies.
                                                                                                                            ANTH 552-401 ARCHAEOMETALLURGY SEMINAR JANSEN, JAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 F 0900AM-1200PM This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of archaeological metals. Topics to be discussed include: exploitation of ore and its transformation to metal in ancient times, distribution of metal as a raw materials, provenance studies, development and organization of early metallurgy, and interdisciplinary investigations of metals and related artifacts like slag and crucibles. Students will become familiar with the full spectrum of analytical procedures, ranging from microscopy for materials characterization to mass spectrometry for geochemical fingerprinting, and will work on individual research projects analyzing archaeological objects following the analytical methodology of archaeometallurgy.
                                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                              ANTH 556-401 BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL ARCHAEOLOGIST DIBBLE, HAROLD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 427 W 0200PM-0500PM This course (cross-listed as AAMW556) is designed to prepare graduate students for a career in academic archaeology. Topics to be covered include project research design (including logistical planning), acquiring funding (proposal writing), managing grants (including budget planning and reconciliation), publishing, and preparing for entering the job market (writing cover letters and CVs). Students are also encouraged to suggest further topics of interest as the semester goes on. The final project will be the development of a NSF grant proposal, which will be presented and critiqued in stages throughout the semester, and which can serve as the basis for later submission. While much of the focus is on archaeology, students in other disciplines, especially those involving field research, will also benefit.
                                                                                                                                CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                ANTH 558-401 MONUMENT, MEMORY, AND PLACE IN SOUTH ASIA LYCETT, MARK CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 1030AM-1200PM Drawing on the archaeology and landscape history of South Asia, this seminar explores place-making and social geographies as they play out through a series of inter-related themes: situated history, embodiment, monumentality, social memory, and appropriation. We consider approaches to site, monument, and image as experienced and construed through audience, circumstance, and politics; and how these conditions both inform and transform the meaningful construction of place, commemoration, and heritage. This discussion sets the stage for a broader consideration of the politics of heritage in contemporary South Asia.
                                                                                                                                  ANTH 567-401 LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MONGE, JANET
                                                                                                                                  MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                                                                                                  WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                                                                                                  UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                                                                                                    OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                    ANTH 586-601 CULTURE, PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 W 0530PM-0830PM The goal of this course is to understand and to investigate both historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. Reading topics cover both contemporary and scholarly issues in cultural anthropology, popular culture, consumer behavior, off-shore production, social networking, media and communications, financial and real estate markets and marketing. Class distinctions are equally interdisciplinary as we focus on investigating and identifying critical global/local linkages. We analyze the various ways in which Philadelphia and other "global cities" are competing for consumer revenues. We ask what factors have led contemporary society reaching its current stage of mass consumption and how have certain goods and services been reconfigured, packaged or re-packaged to attract new consumers. In order to better understand the link between consumption and production factors we explore the relationship between outsourcing and/or offshore production and modern consumption. Approximately sixty percent of the seminar takes place in the classroom and will include lecture, class discussion, and films. The remaining portion of the class meetings will involve local and regional travel. Research assignments emphasize the use of anthropological participant-observation techniques to investigate the relationships between culture and contemporary mass consumption within the contexts of re-gentrification, urbanization, and globalization.
                                                                                                                                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                                                      ANTH 587-401 RACE, NATION, EMPIRE THOMAS, DEBORAH UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 T 0200PM-0500PM This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.
                                                                                                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                        ANTH 592-401 BIOARCHAEOLOGY OF THE PEOPLES OF THE PAST MONGE, JANET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 F 0200PM-0500PM This class introduces the field of bioarchaeology, the study of human remains in archaeological contexts, and is designed specifically for the reconstruction of the lifeways of peoples in the past. The focus of the course is on the population (rather than on the individual) level and covers much of human history and prehistory through a series of case studies. Using the basic techniques of analysis of the human skeleton, and in recognition of the dynamic nature of bone as it responds to changes in the environment, population parameters can be used to understand the efficacy of humans, both biologically and culturally, to respond to the ever changing physical environments of the globe.
                                                                                                                                          ANTH 593-640 NAT&CULT HER GLOBAL PERS DANIELS, BRIAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 M 0500PM-0800PM This seminar will explore the ideas surrounding the theories, discourses, and practices surrounding natural and cultural heritage. Heritage has become inscribed in the planning of urban and rural landscapes, designed as tourist destinations, and considered a universal good in global cosmopolitan society. But it would be well to ask: what kind of "nature" and "culture" has been labeled as heritage? What kind of organizations, economics, and politics are necessary to sustain it? How are these put in place? By whom? For whom? Over the course of the semester, students will engage with readings that discuss how cultural and natural heritage is communicated to the public and the relationship between academic critique and pragmatic social engagement. This seminar is further grounded by a partnership between the Penn Cultural Heritage Center and the U.S. Mission to UNESCO focused on the assessment of World Heritage Sites, and students will have the opportunity to learn from and participate in specific case studies.
                                                                                                                                            ANTH 602-301 EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY SCHURR, THEODORE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 T 0130PM-0430PM This course will explore various subfields of biological anthropology to better understand what it means to be human. Special attention will be paid to current issues and problems in these subfields, and the different ways in which researchers are attempting to understand and uncover the details of human evolution. Among the areas that are explored in this course are paleoanthropology, primatology, human biology, molecular anthropology, evolutionary medicine, epigenetics, and human life history. Specific issues to be explored include the primate roots of human behavior, brain and language evolution, new fossil hominins, the origins of anatomically modern humans, and modern human migration history.
                                                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                              ANTH 607-401 CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICANS BRUCHAC, MARGARET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course examines the social and political lives of contemporary Native American Indians in the United States and Canada. Topics include: Indigenous identity; homelands and natural resources; popular culture and media; Indigenous arts and cultural expression; museum representations; athletics; gender relations; tribal recognition and sovereignty; and resistance movements. We will consider the origins of federal programs and legislation that have become essential to the protection of Native American freedoms. Students can expect to gain an appreciation of the complexity and cultural diversity of Native communities and tribal nations and insights into their interactions with other cultures over time.
                                                                                                                                                CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                                                                ANTH 617-301 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF CULTURE & SOCIETY PETRYNA, ADRIANA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 W 0200PM-0500PM A critical examination of recent history and theory in cultural and social anthropology. Topics include structural-functionalism; symbolic anthropology; post-modern theory. Emphasis is on major schools and trends in America, Britain, and France.
                                                                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                  ANTH 619-640 MLA Proseminar: Cultural Diversity and Global Connections HALL, KATHLEEN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 T 0500PM-0740PM This course considers the intensification of global connections and what anthropologist Anna Tsing has referred to as the "zones of awkward engagement" that emerge within the contemporary global capitalist order. Social problems, such as environmental change, the welfare of refugees, human rights abuses, or poverty in the Global South, have increasingly come to be seen as global issues best solved through multinational or international cooperation. Efforts to address these problems bring together diverse stakeholders, international experts, policy makers, politicians, civil servants, activists, international and local volunteers as well as local people, each interpreting "the problem" from different cultural perspectives and possessing varying degrees of power to affect change. Ethnographic analysis is particularly well suited to examining the diverse and conflicting social interactions, misunderstandings and multiple perspectives, cultural politics and power dynamics that arise locally within these zones of awkward engagement and that ultimately shape the outcomes of social change efforts. The course will emphasize the close and critical reading of ethnographic accounts of a range of social improvement efforts --environmentalist, human rights, refugee relief, and fair trade economic efforts-- across different regions of the world to gain a better understanding of how cultural diversity and power relations shape social interaction within these globalizes zones of awkward engagement. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the nature and practice of ethnographic research and of the challenges faced in engaging globally.
                                                                                                                                                    ANTH 629-401 MONEY, MARKETS, AND MUTUALITY MITCHELL, LISA WILLIAMS HALL 843 T 0130PM-0430PM This course examines intersections of the fiscal and the social, paying parti- cular attention to informal sectors in the urban and urbanizing global South. Drawing from recent ethnographic and historical work on informal networks of credit, banking, and other financial arrangements, the course will examine the roles of rotating credit associations, financial self-help groups, direct cash payments, informal insurance networks, intersections of socio-cultural identi- ties (caste, ethnicity, shared origins or educational background) with credit networks, locally embedded understandings of creditworthiness that may be grounded in social rather than economic capital, and informal mechanisms for the movement of credit and debt across spaces and communities, both historica- lly and in the present. Students other than PhD must contact instructor to request permit to see if room is available to register.
                                                                                                                                                      FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                                                                      ANTH 631-301 GRAMMATICAL CATEGORIES AGHA, ASIF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 410 R 1000AM-0100PM The course is an introduction to grammatical organization in human language for students in linguistic anthropology and associated fields. Primary foci: methods for the analysis of grammatical categories; constituency and propositional content; grammatical typology and universals. Other topics: relationship of grammatical categories to other principles organizing communication, conceptualization and interpersonal conduct; analysis of interlocking category systems; relationship of categories to actual human behavior. Students are encouraged to apply the techniques developed in lectures and assigned readings to the analysis of a non-Indo-European language over the course of the semester.
                                                                                                                                                        ANTH 633-401 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY COX, SAMANTHA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will investigate and discuss the various techniques of analysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysis of life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations of forensic anthropology and the application of DNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.
                                                                                                                                                          ANTH 643-640 MLA Proseminar: Globalization and Its Historical Significance SPOONER, BRIAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 419 M 0530PM-0810PM Globalization is one of the most comprehensive topics of our time, and also one of the most controversial. This course assesses the current state of globalization, considering it in terms of economic, political, and cultural change, and follows its progress through the semester. The class will be led through the main topics and debates, introduced to conceptual and empirical tools for framing academic discussion and research about its dynamics, how and when it began, and (most particularly) how it differs from earlier episodes of historical change.
                                                                                                                                                            ANTH 707-401 CRAFT OF ETHNOGRAPHY HALL, KATHLEEN EDUCATION BUILDING 203 W 0430PM-0630PM This course is designed to follow after Ethnographic Research Methods (EDUC 721). In the introductory course, students learned how to use qualitative methods in conducting a brief field study. This advanced level course focuses on research design and specifically the craft of ethnographic research. Students will apply what they learn in the course in writing a proposal for a dissertation research project.
                                                                                                                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                                                              ANTH 709-301 CURRENT RESEARCH IN PALEOANTHROPOLOGY DIBBLE, HAROLD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 427 M 0200PM-0500PM An intensive review of the major topics relating to Pleistocene human evolution, focusing on the integration of data from both biology and archeology.
                                                                                                                                                                CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                                                                ANTH 720-601 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 F 0630PM-0930PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                  ANTH 720-602 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                    ANTH 720-603 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                                                      ANTH 733-301 NATURES, COLLOQUIUM 2017-2018 MORRISON, KATHLEEN
                                                                                                                                                                      ANAND, NIKHIL
                                                                                                                                                                      UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 M 1200PM-0300PM This graduate seminar is a full year course open to second year anthropology graduate students. Other interested students should contact the instructors for permission before enrolling. Topic changes each year, corresponding to the Penn Anthropology Department Colloquium series.
                                                                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION