Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 100-301 COLLECTING AND DISPLAYING CLASSICAL ART BROWNLEE, ANN W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Spring 2019: In this seminar, we will consider the classical collections in the great 19th century European and American museums, with particular attention to issues of provenance and display. We will look at, for example, the collections of Greek and Roman art in the British Museum, the Louvre, the Vatican, the Glyptothek in Munich, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and New York s Metropolitan Museum of Art. With this analysis as background, we will move on to study the formation of the classical collection in the University of Pennsylvania Museum in the second half of the semester. Much of this material comes from archaeological excavations sponsored by the Museum, but we will concentrate on the many small classical collections, formed in the late 19th century, which are now in the Museum. We will look particularly at the collectors, most of them prominent Philadelphians, using well-known collectors such as John G. Johnson and Clara Bloomfield Moore as models. This is an object-based learning course, and the Museum s classical collection will serve as an important resource, as will the documentation preserved in both the Museum s Archives and in archival repositories throughout the city several of which we will visit. Finally, we will consider how these collections were displayed both in the Museum and in the Philadelphia houses of the collectors.
    OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
    ARTH 102-401 RENAISSANCE-CONTEMPORARY: Introduction to Western Art, 1400-Present DAVIS, JULIE
    DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
    WF 1200PM-0100PM This course is an introduction to the global visual arts, roughly covering the years 1400 to the present and all media including painting, sculpture, architecture, print culture, and new media (such as photography, film, performance, and installation art). The class will cover aspects of art production across the globe and will begin to introduce students to the arts of Asia, the Americas, the Islamic world, as well as Europe, and will focus especially on the manifold interchanges between them. It offers a broad historical overview of the key techniques, movements and artists of the period, as well as an investigation into the crucial themes and contexts that mark visual art production after the middle ages. Such themes include the new materials and techniques of art making; transcultural visual exchange; the secularization of art; the (gendered) role of the artist in society; the sites of art production and consumption such as the artist's studio, the royal courts, ecclesiastical environs and the art exhibition; the import of technology and science on art's making, content and distribution; the rise of art criticism/writing; and the socio-political contexts of patronage and audience; among others. The content of the class will vary slightly according to the expertise of the instructors.
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 107-601 TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA GALLION, JEREMY M 0500PM-0800PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project.
        ARTH 108-401 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 MAZAJ, META TR 0300PM-0430PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 109-401 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES CORRIGAN, TIMOTHY TR 0130PM-0300PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            ARTH 217-401 CHINESE PAINTING STEINHARDT, NANCY MW 1000AM-1100AM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting style forms the basis of analysis, and themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social and cultural issues. The class pays particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to look at paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, PMA and/or local collections.
              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
              ARTH 225-401 GREEK ART AND ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2nd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engaged viewers' emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss the relationships of images and things to space and structure, along with ideas of invention and progress, and the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.
                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ARTH 235-601 Introduction to Visual Culture in the Islamic World VAN LOAN, THEODORE W 0430PM-0730PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ARTH 240-401 MEDIEVAL ART GUERIN, SARAH TR 0900AM-1030AM An introductory survey, this course investigates architecture, painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students become familiar with selected major monuments of the Romanesque and Gothic periods, primarily in Western Europe as well as relevant sites around the Mediterranean. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects and monuments. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the role of luxury in the medieval west; the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.
                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ARTH 250-401 MICHELANGELO ITAL REN: MICHELANGELO AND THE ART OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE KIM, DAVID MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources.
                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                      ARTH 274-601 FACING AMERICA SCHMENNER, WILLIAM M 0500PM-0800PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.
                        CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                        ARTH 281-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT BROWNLEE, DAVID MWF 1100AM-1200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          ARTH 294-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasinglyimportant exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                            ARTH 295-401 CINEMA AND MEDIA: GLOBAL FILM THEORY REDROBE, KAREN
                            MAZAJ, META
                            TR 1030AM-1130AM This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be a weekly film screening for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mid-term; 1 final project.
                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                              ARTH 305-401 SPIEGEL-WILKS SEMINAR: CURATING INDIA'S ART IN THE CONTEMPORARY CONTEXT MASON, DARIELLE T 0130PM-0430PM Spring 2019: Multicultural, multi-religious, and spanning millennia, India s artistic heritage is complicated and contested. This course is not an introduction to Indian art but rather an exploration of some of the conceptual, ethical, aesthetic, and practical issues involved in exhibiting, interpreting, and collecting it by U.S. museums in the 21st century. Students will dive behind the scenes with a working curator to focus on permanent collections. Case studies include two recent projects the new South Asian Galleries at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (opened 2016) and the Seattle Asian Art Museum (expected opening late 2019). Weekly readings will address the politics of display and ownership; religious objects in museums; identity and community; design, technology, and visitor experience. These will be enhanced by discussions with other Philadelphia Museum of Art staff (e.g. specialists in audience and provenance research, conservator, educator interpreter). In March the class will take a two-day trip to New York during annual Asian Art Week to visit dealers, auction houses, and museums. There will be two short writing assignments (a critical analysis of an installation walkthrough and a recommendation for the purchase of a work of art you find in New York). As a final project, students will create and present an original virtual mini-exhibition that could become a part of an actual gallery rotation at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Classes will be held at the PMA; New York trip is required and will span at least one weekday. PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR, CLASS SIZE LIMITED
                                OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                ARTH 323-401 ORIGINS OF WRITING / ORIGINS OF ART PITTMAN, HOLLY W 0200PM-0500PM Each of the earliest systems of writing had intimate and enduring ties to pictorial traditions. This seminar addresses the fundamental relationship between texts and visual imagery in the Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Chinese, and Maya traditions. The class will take a comparative approach to examine the parallel development of scripts and images, extending from their earliest beginnings to their on-going lives as mature systems. As the individual scripts became more capable of representing speech, the subject matter, composition, and function of images changed, and one goal of this class is to identify these processes. Emphasis will be put on seeing text and image as collaborative and interactive constructions, in which parts of a single message can be encoded and presented in different ways. The class will make extensive use of the collections and the curatorial expertise of the Penn Museum.
                                  OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                  ARTH 379-401 GLOBAL MEDIA: GLOBAL TV MUKHERJEE, RAHUL W 0200PM-0500PM This course explores a broad media landscape through new critical and conceptual approaches. It is designated as a Benjamin Franklin Seminar. This course maps the footprints of television at a global scale. Adopting comparative approaches, we will be studying TV's formation of national and global discourses, and thereby recognizing not only television's impact on processes of globalization, but also the ability of television to matter globally. Working through concepts of "broadcasting," "flow," "circulation," and "circumvention," the course examines the movement of (and blocks encountered by) television programs and signals across national borders and cultures. The course particularly focuses on how global television cultures have been transformed due to shifts from broadcasting technologies to (Internet) streaming services? Navigating from United States and Cuba to India and Egypt, the readings in the course illuminate how particular televisual genres, institutions, and reception practices emerged in various countries during specific historical periods. We shall be addressing a range of questions: what kind of global phenomenon is television? Can we study television in countries where we do not know the existing local languages? In what different ways (through what platforms, interfaces, and screens) do people in different continents access televisual content? What explains the growing transnational exports of Turkish and Korean TV dramas? What is the need to historically trace the infrastructural systems like satellites (and optical fiber cables) that made (and continue to make) transmission of television programming possible across the world? How do fans circumvent geo-blocking to watch live sporting events? Assignments include submitting weekly discussion questions and a final paper. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                    ARTH 388-401 TOP:MODERN & CONTEMP ART: POSTMODERN, POSTCOLONIAL, POST-BLACK SHAW, GWENDOLYN W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Spring 2019: The end of the last century saw a shift in the way contemporary artistic practice was conceived. This class will consider the work and writings of key artists and thinkers of the last 50 years who have tackled issues of race, class, consumption, marginality, nationality, and modernism.
                                      ARTH 398-000 SENIOR THESIS Independent research.
                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                        ARTH 398-008 SENIOR THESIS BROWNLEE, DAVID Independent research.
                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                          ARTH 398-035 SENIOR THESIS DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE Independent research.
                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                            ARTH 410-401 SACRED IN MEDVAL EUROPE TYCZ, KATHERINE W 1000AM-0100PM During devotional activities people engage with various objects and believe that they are imbued with religious significance. In this seminar, we will explore the material culture of religion across medieval and early modern Europe. From rosary beads and crucifixes to devotional books, prints, and paintings, a range of "sacred stuff" populated the lives of medieval and early modern Europeans. We will consider objects associated with daily life as well as rites of passage. We will study objects of Christian devotion and will consider how the advent of Protestantism and the Catholic Reformation influenced the types of objects devotees used for their devotion. In this seminar, we will discuss the material culture of Judaism and Islam, religions also practiced in medieval and early modern Europe. We will engage with "sacred stuff" from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including art history, literature, archaeology, social history, and cultural history. We will then hone these skills with visits to local museums and libraries where wewill view medieval and early modern books, objects and images. Course assignments will include an in-depth analysis of a devotional object from medieval or early modern Europe chosen by the student.
                                              ARTH 425-401 LATE ANTIQUE ARTS KUTTNER, ANN TR 0600PM-0730PM What is 'Late Antiquity'? In 312 when Roman emperor Constantine inaugurated a Christian empire, 'Roman' culture was centuries old. The period ca. 200-650 CE saw profound transformations that launched Medieval, Byzantine and Islamic traditions. In this epoch of economic and political upheaval destruction was frequent but partial: Rome long survived, Constantine's 'new Rome,' Constantinople flourished, and around the Empire both proto-global visual culture and local forms prospered. Roman cultural models authorized both innovation and passion for tradition, in forms and styles: we critique art-historical models for Late Antique 'decline', analyse habits of material reuse and curation, and look at new Christian and Jewish roles for Roman things as well as polytheist visual survival. Foreign allies and enemies, and new peoples invading an already polyethnic Empire, interacted with Greco-Roman Late Antiquity: we visit arts of Sasanian and Islamic empires east and south, and 'barbarian' domains in Africa, Europe, Britain. Media discussed, for sacred, courtly, domestic, funerary, political and civic spaces and structures include not just 'monumental' painting, mosaic, sculpture, but also objects of silver, ceramic, ivory, figural textile, glass; painted books; jewelry; mass-media artifacts like coins and pilgrimage tokens. We also study Late Antique texts on art, objects, space and viewership.
                                                ARTH 436-401 LATER ISLAMIC ART & ARCH: FROM THE ALHAMBRA TO THE TAJ MAHAL HOLOD, RENATA TR 1200PM-0130PM Istanbul, Samarkand, Isfahan, Cairo and Delhi as major centers of art production in the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. Attention is given to urban and architectural achievement as well as to the key monuments of painting and metalwork. The visual environment of the "gunpowder empires" is discussed.
                                                  ARTH 503-640 PROSEM IN ART HISTORY: Art, Architecture and Venezianita in the Renaissance PASTORE, CHRISTOPHER W 0530PM-0810PM Topic varies.
                                                    ARTH 510-401 BUDDHIST TEXTS & CONTEXTS MCDANIEL, JUSTIN CANCELED This is an advanced course for upper level undergraduates and graduate students on various issues in the study of Buddhist texts, art, and history. Each semester the theme of the course changes. In recent years themes have included: Magic and Ritual, Art and Material Culture, Texts and Contexts, Manuscript Studies.
                                                      ARTH 530-401 ATHENIAN TOPOGRAPHY ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Spring 2019: This course studies the ancient city of Athens, its monuments, buildings and spaces of the ancient urban core-an area roughly 3 square kilometers surrounding the Acropolis and defended in the Classical period by a wall some 6.5 kilometers in length. Drawing on archaeological, literary and epigraphic evidence, we will examine the extant monuments of Athens from the Classical through the Byzantine period. The goal will be to gain a thorough understanding of the topography and monuments of the city. The ancient city-state (or polis) of Athens was contiguous with the region known as Attica, a large, triangular peninsula extending southeastward from the Greek mainland into the Aegean Sea, and the course will also address the geography, economy and religious topography of the Attica peninsula, including its demoi (subdivisions), its harbor complex at Peiraieus and its suburban sanctuaries. Athens is unquestionably the Greek city whose art, architecture, literature, philosophy, and political history have had the greatest impact on the Western tradition and imagination and the course will tackle the history of the city and its monuments through time in order to shed light on the aspects that make Athens exceptional among other Greek city-states, on the many lives of its monuments and buildings as well as its afterlife in the Byzantine period.
                                                        ARTH 540-401 TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ART: ART AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE IN THE MEDIEVAL MEDITERRANEAN SYSTEM GUERIN, SARAH
                                                        OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT
                                                        R 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies. Spring 2019: Between the medieval metropolitan capitals of Constantinople and Paris lay the dynamic connecting sea -- the Mediterranean. This course begins by looking in depth at the birth and development of those two key capital cities, and their competitive interactions. Urban centers around the Mediterranean littoral contributed significantly to the networks linking and provisioning those two key metropoli: Venice, Palermo, Tunis, Sijilmasa, Acre, Cairo and Cordoba. This seminar will examine the urban fabric and the objects produced in an array of Mediterranean cities thriving in the Middle Ages, revealing the unexpected ways that they were connected by the sea. This seminar is limited to graduate students only, and permission must be sought from the instructors before enrollment.
                                                          OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                          ARTH 550-301 TOPICS IN S. REN ART: THEORIES OF PICTORIAL COMPOSITION KIM, DAVID M 0200PM-0500PM Topic Varies. Spring 2019: This course explores the art of composition in two respects: first, composition as the arrangement of words and sentences into prose; second, composition as the organization of visual elements into a painting. Through the writings of key Renaissance writers, we will explore such issues as the mythical origins of the portrait, the role of precious materials in art, the relationship between figure and ground, and the mechanics of describing a painting into words. Some knowledge of a Romance language (Italian, French, Spanish, or Portuguese) helpful though by no means required.
                                                            ARTH 570-301 EASTERN ST PENITENTIARY: EASTERN STATE PENITENTIARY BROWNLEE, DAVID T 0130PM-0430PM Eastern State Penitentiary is one of the most famous and influential buildings in the world. Built in the early nineteenth century as an embodiment of the ideals of prison reformers, it is now preserved as a historic site whose award-winning programming explores contemporary issues of mass incarceration and criminal justice, subjects that many Americans believe to be the civil rights issues of our times. Taught in partnership with the staff of Eastern State, this seminar will explore the management of this "anchor institution." Topics to be considered include strategic planning, interpretation of the site, the design of programs and exhibitions (including site-specific art installations and theatrical events), architectural planning and conservation, and engagement with diverse constituencies and neighborhoods. The class will explore notable failures and missteps along with programmatic successes, and will explore ethical choices made when balancing social justice programming and the origination's Halloween-themed fundraising activities.
                                                              ARTH 582-301 MODERN & CONTEMP DESIGN: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY DESIGN BROWNLEE, DAVID
                                                              FISHER, MICHELLE
                                                              HIESINGER, KATHRYN
                                                              R 0130PM-0430PM This seminar will provide a brief overview of the history of modern and contemporary design, from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution to today, and engage students in the hands-on analysis of objects through the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the consideration of the presentation of objects in museums, and the discussion of several important contemporary topics in the study of material culture.
                                                                OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                                                ARTH 625-401 GREEK ART AND ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2nd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engaged viewers' emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss the relationships of images and things to space and structure, along with ideas of invention and progress, and the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.
                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                  ARTH 640-401 MEDIEVAL ART GUERIN, SARAH TR 0900AM-1030AM An introductory survey, this course investigates painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students become familiar with selected major monuments of the Late Antique, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as primary textual sources. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the aesthetic status of art and the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.
                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                    ARTH 650-401 MICHELANGELO ITAL REN: MICHELANGELO AND THE ART OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE KIM, DAVID MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources.
                                                                      ARTH 681-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT BROWNLEE, DAVID MWF 1100AM-1200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                        ARTH 694-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                                                                          ARTH 701-401 PROSEMINAR IN METHODS ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA W 0200PM-0500PM Spring 2019: This course introduces theories and methods of the history of art and architecture, as well as classical archaeology, that have played a major role in the formation of these disciplines from the later eighteenth century to the present day. Classical archaeology is usually said to begin as art history with J.J. Winckelmann (1717-68) and the course will map the intellectual geographies of these disciplines. Our aim will be to shed light on the epistemological underpinning of Winckelmann's History of Art of Antiquity, the shakiness of subsequent understandings of historical processes but foremost to consider other approaches. The seminar will give a broad overview of theories and methods in relation to relevant developments in other disciplines, such as philosophy, aesthetics, history, and anthropology. Topics include antiquarianism, idealism, formalism, iconography and iconology, semiotics, technologies of vision and the period eye, theories of space and place, gender and sexuality studies, the social history of art, and neuroaesthetics among others. Readings include key texts by major art and architecture theorists and historians and tackle approaches that range from early connoisseurship and the Frankfurt and Vienna Schools to recent questions of "affect" and discourses of eco-aesthetics.
                                                                            ARTH 737-401 ISLAMIC ARCHITECTURE: PRE-MODERN, 1000-1600 CE: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND USE HOLOD, RENATA T 0300PM-0600PM This seminar will address the problems of studying architecture in the Islamic world. Considered will be issues of architectural design, regional and trans-regional constructional traditions, structural know-how and innovation, patronage and use. The examples discussed will be mainly religious and social service complexes. Attention will be paid to the manner of transmission of architectural design knowledge and constructional skill.
                                                                              ARTH 761-301 TOPICS IN N. REN ART: SCARCITY IN EARLY MODERN ART AND THOUGHT BRISMAN, SHIRA T 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies. Spring 2019: The notion of nature as fecund has spawned not only images of lushness but also analogies to the artist's mind as a fertile place. Yet even in the early modern era, the taste for artistic objects in gold, silver, wax, and wood led to harvesting processes which met the awareness that nature's resources could run low or even run out. As a collective effort to write the other side of the story of Renaissance abundance, this course will proceed by addressing the question of how the history of a finely crafted object (a goblet, an engraving, a painting on touchstone) might be told as a description of materials and their potential for expenditure. We will address this question by focusing on primary sources, theoretical texts, and a selection of objects, images, and early books from collections near at hand.
                                                                                OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                                                                ARTH 775-301 TOP IN 19TH C. EUR ART: ART AND TIME IN 19TH CENTURY PAINTING DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE R 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies. Spring 2019: This graduate seminar considers the concepts of time active in the rise of modern painting in the 19th century, from historical time, leisure time and perceptual time to labor and mechanical time. Too rarely has the history of time and time-keeping, from the industrialization of time to the advent of universal time been used as a tool in the study of modernist painting (as opposed to say the moving image) except perhaps in terms of chronology. To that end, we will think through, as aesthetic categories, the concept of the moment, the instant, the impression, the now, the shock, and also seriality and narrative sequence, and consider painting's oft-cited competition with the camera's evolving shutter speeds. More broadly, we will discuss the various times implied by new media and new artistic materials. Focusing on the century's changing institutions of art (from the world's fair to the independent exhibition), we will consider new demands placed on the time of viewing and active concentration. Finally, we will analyze art's place within the century's often rapid historic changes, such as revolutionary upheavals or shifting political regimes. Artists to be studied include Turner, Manet, Monet, Degas, and Menzel, among others, whose work stretches the decades, roughly, between 1830 and 1900. Beside the key art historical literature, we will read extensively in both the cultural history of time and perception (Kern, Galison, Koselleck, Crary) and the aesthetic philosophy of time from Lessing to Deleuze (including Nietzsche, Blanqui, Bergson, Durkheim, Benjamin, and Kubler, among others).