Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 100-401 30 Americans LEVY, AARON FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16 M 0200PM-0500PM The primary goal of the freshman seminar program is to provide every freshman the opportunity for a direct personal encounter with a faculty member in a small sitting devoted to a significant intellectual endeavor. Specific topics be posted at the beginning of each academic year. Please see the College Freshman seminar website for information on current course offerings https://www.college.upenn.edu/node/403.
    OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
    ARTH 101-001 PREHISTORY - RENAISSANCE: INTRO TO WESTERN ART KUTTNER, ANN FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 MW 1000AM-1100AM This course serves as a double introduction to the History of Art. First it is a survey of the ancient world that lays the foundation for the History of Art across the whole Eastern Hemisphere. Across this enormous timespan and geographical spread, an emphasis will be placed on moments of interaction, as well as analogies. Secondly, through this overview of the Ancient world up to around 1400, the basic skills that serve the student in the study of the History of Art will also be developed: close looking, understanding plans, the basics of iconography, questions of stylistic development, among others.
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 106-001 ARCHITECT AND HISTORY ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA STITELER HALL B26 MW 0100PM-0200PM The built environment shapes our lives and this course tackles its underpinning design principles and qualities as well as social and cultural contexts. It is an interpretative look at the built environment or, more precisely, at the ways in which monuments and cities are designed, represented, perceived and construed over time. It introduces students to the interrelated fields of architecture, art history, and urbanism and explores great architectural monuments and cities from the modern to the ancient period, from the US across Europe and from the Mediterranean to Asia. We will assess the built environment as culturally meaningful form and examine a body of historical and cultural material relevant to its interpretation. In doing so, the course seeks to foster a critical understanding of the cultural and artistic processes that have influenced architectural and urban design. The focus will be on understanding these works as results of skilled workmanship as well as social and cultural products. We will tackle ancient and modern perceptions of these monuments and cities by analyzing form, design, structure and by addressing their perceptual qualities through 3D reconstructions and virtual environments, as well as sketchbook assignments. This course fulfills Sector IV, Humanities and Social Sciences. It cannot be taken pass/fail and must be taken for a regular grade. All assignments (6 sketchbook assignments and 2 papers) have to be completed and both exams attended, in order to pass the course.
        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
        ARTH 107-401 TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA MUKHERJEE, RAHUL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 M 0200PM-0500PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project.
          ARTH 107-601 TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA GALLION, JEREMY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 141 M 0500PM-0800PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project.
            ARTH 108-401 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 DECHERNEY, PETER FISHER-BENNETT HALL 419 MW 0200PM-0330PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
              ARTH 109-401 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES MAZAJ, META FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 TR 1200PM-0130PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                ARTH 109-601 WORLD FILM HISTORY 1945-PRESENT TRENTIN, FILIPPO FISHER-BENNETT HALL 201 TR 0500PM-0630PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ARTH 141-401 PUBLIC POLICY, MUSEUMS, AND THE ETHICS OF CULTURAL HERITAGE LEVENTHAL, RICHARD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will focus upon and examine the ethics of international heritage and the role that Museums play in the preservation of identity and cultural heritage. The mission of this course will be to inform and educate students about the role of Museums within the 21st century. What is the role and position of antiquities and important cultural objects in Museums? How should Museums acquire these objects and when should they be returned to countries and cultural groups? Examples from current issues will be included in the reading and discussions along with objects and issues within the Penn Museum.
                    ARTH 214-401 ARTS OF CHINA STEINHARDT, NANCY EDUCATION BUILDING 203 MW 1000AM-1100AM The goals of this course are to introduce the major artistic traditions of China, from the Neolithic period to the present and to teach the fundamental methods of the discipline of art history. Our approaches will be chronological, considering how the arts developed in and through history, and thematic, discussing how art and architecture were used for philosophical, religious and material ends. Topics of study will include; Shang bronzes: Han concepts of the afterlife; the impact of Buddhism; patronage and painting; the landscape tradition; the concept of the literatus; architecture and garden design; the "modern" and 20th-century artistic practices; among others.
                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                      ARTH 222-401 ART OF ANCIENT IRAN PITTMAN, HOLLY JAFFE BUILDING 113 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age.
                        ARTH 227-401 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology BOWES, KIMBERLY EDUCATION BUILDING 200 MW 1000AM-1100AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          ARTH 230-401 THE MATERIAL WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH
                          BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE
                          JANSEN, JAN
                          UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1030AM-1200PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221 will take place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.
                            CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                            ARTH 232-401 BYZANTINE ART & ARCH BOOMER, MEGAN JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium--a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts: political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium's interactions with neighboring cultures.
                              ARTH 235-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD CANCELED A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                ARTH 237-401 BERLIN: HIST POL CULTURE WEISSBERG, LILIANE CANCELED What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, its transformation into an industrial city in the late nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structre, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we wil ready literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin. Indeed, Berlin will be a specific example to explore German history and cultural life of the last 300 years. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, and urban studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduage students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin.
                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                  ARTH 261-401 NORTHERN RENAISSANCE ART BRISMAN, SHIRA JAFFE BUILDING 113 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course critically examines concepts traditionally associated with the Renaissance by focusing on the exchange of artistic ideas throughout the Holy Roman Empire and across different media, such as the altarpieces of Jan van Eyck, the expressive drawings of Albrecht Durer and Hans Baldung Grien, the peasant studies of Pieter Bruegel and the prints of satirists who wished to remain anonymous. The material is organized thematically around four topics: religious art as piety and politics; antiquity as a source of tradition and imagination; the formulation of a public discourse that exposed social threats; and the distinctiveness of artistic claims of individual achievement. A motif throughout the course is the question of how the survival of fragments may be presented in museum contexts as parts standing in for an absent whole. We will also consider how historians approach designs for works of art now lost or never completed. Encouraging encounters with art and artifacts around the city, assignments focus on objects in Philadelphia collections.
                                    ARTH 267-401 LATIN AMERICAN ART CASTRO, MARK CANCELED The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina.
                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                      ARTH 270-401 THE MODERN CITY BROWNLEE, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING B17 MWF 1100AM-1200PM A study of the European and American city in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the history of architecture and urban design; political, sociological, and economic factors also receive attention. The class considers the development of London, St. Petersburg, Washington, Boston, Paris, Vienna and Philadelphia.
                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                        ARTH 274-601 FACING AMERICA SCHMENNER, WILLIAM JAFFE BUILDING B17 W 0530PM-0830PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.
                                          ARTH 276-401 IMPRESSIONISM DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE STITELER HALL B21 TR 0300PM-0430PM Impressionism opened the pictorial field to light, perception, science, modernity, bourgeoise leisure and famously the material qualities of paint itself. This course will survey the movement's major contexts and proponents--Manet, Monet, Morisot, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin--from its origins in the 1860's to its demise in the 1890's, as well as its subsequent adaptions throughout the world until World War I. Particular attention is paid to the artists' critical reception and the historical conditions which allowed one nation, France, to claim the emergence of early Modernism so firmly for itself. The course also analyzes the effects of the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Paris, and its affects on artistic developments. We also look outside of France's borders to Germany and Britain.
                                            ARTH 285-601 MODERN ART: AFRICA AND EUROPE ROACH, IMANI JAFFE BUILDING 113 W 0500PM-0800PM The history of modern art is closely tied to and largely unfolds from the history of Western Imperialism. While the technologies made possible by colonial resource extraction produced new ways of looking, modern conceptions of the self and how to represent it developed in dialogue with racialized notions of the other. This course focuses on encounters between the cultures of Africa and Europe, from 1880 to 1960, and on the visual practices that emerged on both continents as a result. Topics of special interest will include racial difference and the birth of photography, colonial masquerade, impressionism, symbols of power in royal arts, cubism, mass marketing and colonial self-fashioning, West African studio photography, world's fairs and the Musee de l'Homme, Dada and surrealism, Negritude and interwar Paris, anti-aesthetics, colonial arts education, National art schools in the age of African independence, humanism and South African photography under Apartheid.
                                              ARTH 313-301 TOPICS IN E. ASIAN ART: SPIEGEL-WILKS SEMINAR / VENICE BIENNALE DAVIS, JULIE JAFFE BUILDING 104 M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies from semester to semester. This seminar focuses on issues confronting artists from East Asia working in today's contemporary art world. We will begin by considering the terms that constitute the definition of the "modern" and the "contemporary," asking how, by whom, and for whom these terms have been configured. By gaining a familiarity with the major styles, media, institutions, artists, and concepts over the twentieth century in East Asia, we will develop tools to analyze how contemporary artists are crossing boundaries, challenging the limits of nationalism, and dealing with shifting political and social grounds. We will take our analysis on site at the Venice Biennale, looking closely at how East Asian artists are participating in, as well as contesting, this influential international exposition. Students will make close studies of national pavilions as well as the international exhibition, generating analyses of these display spaces, and will produce a group website in response to the Biennale as an alternative virtual exhibition. By permission only
                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                ARTH 324-401 DRESS & FASHION IN AFRCA ALI-DINAR, ALI DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 4C6 TR 0300PM-0430PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that s influenced by the surrounding forces.
                                                  ARTH 343-301 TPCS IN MEDIEVAL/REN ART: ART, POLITICS, AND POWER IN LATE MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE FRANCE HERMAN, NICHOLAS VAN PELT LIBRARY 626 W 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary from semester to semester. In Fall 2019, this course will examine the commission, production, and display of art at the Valois courts from the start of the Hundred Years War with England 1330s to the death of Francis I in 1547. During these two centuries, conflict and conquest shaped the making of artwork in profound and sometimes unexpected ways: precarious dynastic claims could be substantiated through carefully crafted images, while foreign artists (including Rosso Fiorentino, Francesco Primaticcio, and Leonardo da Vinci) could be called upon to boost the monarch's prestige. Investigating the role played by objects in cultural diplomacy and propaganda, this course will examine works in a wide variety of techniques including easel painting, manuscript illumination, tapestry, armor, and metalwork, without neglecting less tangible art forms such as feasting, chivalric tournaments, and royal processions. Topics will include the art of the gift, female patronage, the interaction between text and image, and the role of artists in shaping a royal visual identity. The course will include visits to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and an illuminated manuscript handling session at the Free Library of Philadelphia.
                                                    OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                                    ARTH 375-301 TOPICS IN 19TH C. ART: VAN GOGH/CEZANNE/GAUGUIN DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE JAFFE BUILDING 104 W 0330PM-0630PM Topic varies from semester to semester. Collectively, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Cezanne, and Paul Gauguin, although barely recognized by their contemporaries at their deaths, transformed modernist art. In their wake, painting became more starkly chromatic, shrunk pictorial space to a point when linear perspective became almost extinct, and stylized subject-matter like never before. To arrive at some of the most startling painting in the history of art, they made personal sacrifices of many kinds, including undergoing psychic trauma, escaping a comfortable European life, and foregoing public recognition. This seminar will look afresh at their oeuvres and careers, describe their seminal painterly achievements, and place them within the historical context of late 19th-century France and, not least, its Empire and imperial pretentions. Along the way we will read some of the most important 19th, 20th and 21st-century critics and art historians who have grappled with the post-impressionist paradigm and its import for the history of avant-garde painting.
                                                      ARTH 384-401 CUBAN VISUAL CULTURE SCHMENNER, WILLIAM JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course will focus on the urban history and cultural politics of contemporary Cuba with an emphasis on contemporary art and contemporary developments in the city of Havana. Students will learn about the Spanish influence on early colonial art, the development of formal academic art training and the changes to art instruction and the form and content of art created since the Revolution.
                                                        ARTH 387-401 TOPICS IN ANIMATION: THE ANIMATION OF DISNEY SIMENSKY, LINDA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 M 0430PM-0730PM This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Animation. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. Fall 2018: This course will look at American animation as an art form, an industry and a variety of technologies and approaches. We will explore the ways in which artistic, technical, historical, and cultural conditions shape the development of animation and in turn, how animation impacts viewers. Topics will include trends in animation and their relation to contemporary popular culture, issues of art versus commerce in the creation of cartoons, the intersection of animation and politics, and shifts in style and technique throughout the years. We will look at the figures in animation who have shaped the art form and continue to influence it, the rise in animation's popularity, and current-day applications of animated imagery. Case studies will include Pixar, Walt Disney, UPA, television cartoons, stop motion animation, and the movie, Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
                                                          ARTH 391-401 TOPICS FILM HISTORY: TRANSNATIONAL CINEMA MAZAJ, META FISHER-BENNETT HALL 201 TR 0300PM-0430PM Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                                            ARTH 501-301 CURATORIAL SEMINAR: TRESS COLLECTION: JAPANESE ILLUSTRATED BOOKS DAVIS, JULIE VAN PELT LIBRARY 627 F 1200PM-0200PM Curatorial seminars expose students to the complexity of studying and working with objects in the context of public display. With the guidance of faculty and museum professionals, students learn what it means to curate an exhibition, create catalogues and gallery text, and/or develop programming for exhibitions of art and visual/material culture. For the Fall 2019 semester, students in this curatorial seminar will participate in planning the exhibition of Japanese illustrated books from the Tress collection to be held in the Kislak Center in spring 2021. Japanese illustrated books are celebrated for their high technical and aesthetic achievements and the collection spans all genres and formats over more than three hundred years. In this course, students will be thinking through how we can tell the story of the illustrated book in Japan in the space of the exhibition. We will think through how these materials related to their broad and largely literate audiences, and we'll pay close attention to artists, genres, technologies, and subjects. Students will conduct research, prepare didactic labels, write entries for the catalogue, and develop the website and symposium as part of their curatorial practice. There will be extensive hands-on engagement with examples from the Kislak collections as well as practical training in papermaking, materials, and binding. By permission only.
                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                              ARTH 520-401 TOPICS IN AEG BRONZE AGE: THE ARCHITECTURE AND FRESCOES OF AKROTIRI, THERA SHANK, ELIZABETH DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2N36 W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies from semester to semester. This Fall 2019 seminar will discuss TheArchitecture of Akrotiri, Thera. Around 3,500 years ago a culture thrived on the small island of Thera in the Cycladic islands of Greece. Excavations have revealed a portion of a sophisticated town with multi-storied buildings decorated with elaborate fresco programs and equipped with all the necessities to support a cosmopolitan community with trade contacts reaching throughout the Mediterranean, Egypt, and the Ancient Near East. Due to the Bronze Age eruption of the volcano at the center of the island, Akrotiri is known as the best-preserved Late Cycladic site in the Aegean. In this class, we will examine the architecture and frescoes, or wall paintings, of Akrotiri and explore what they reveal to us about this unique group of people. Students will write and present two research papers to the class.
                                                                ARTH 552-640 Improving Nature? Renaissance &Baroque Landscape Architecture & Gardens PASTORE, CHRISTOPHER JAFFE BUILDING 113 T 0530PM-0810PM One Italian poet called his garden "the blending of art and nature." In a garden, he claimed, "one cannot discern whether a thing is the work of one or the other; whether it is a piece of natural artifice or artificial nature." Around the same time, the Italian humanist Jacopo Bonfadio invented the term, terza natura, for gardens seemed to be a "third nature" somehow in between wild first nature and the second built or man-ipulated world of human endeavor. The history of landscape architecture is a history of man's sometimes misguided efforts to "improve" his surroundings in the search for a beauty that harnessed natural forms through the application of human reason. This seminar will address changing tastes in garden design in Early Modern Europe but will also extend our study further into the past, beyond Europe and forward to the present day. The seminar will introduce themes in garden design and examples from garden history and, in the process, the course will ask the participants to consider different cultural visions of the "beautiful" or "appropriate" landscape and ultimately better understand the history of the gardener's art.
                                                                  ARTH 571-301 MODERN ARCH THEORY BROWNLEE, DAVID CANCELED A survey of architectural theory from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The discussion of original writings will be emphasized.
                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    ARTH 579-301 TOPICS IN AMERICAN ART: MASS VISUAL CULTURE, ORIGINS AND THEORIES LEJA, MICHAEL JAFFE BUILDING 113 W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies from semester to semester. In Fall 2019, this seminar will treat the United States as a case study for in-depth examination of the conditions and operations from which a mass visual culture emerged. Our focus will be on the period from 1830 to 1860, when the infrastructure, labor force, institutions, and audiences took shape and when paradigmatic examples of exceptionally successful works were developed. We will compare our empirical findings with some of the influential theories of mass culture developed by Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Janice Radway, Lauren Berlant, Stuart Hall, and others. Our investigations will excavate the foundations of the image-saturated culture we experience in the 21st century. The development of a mass visual culture was among the epochal changes in the 19th century that made the United States a modernized nation. This involved the industrialization of picture production and the formation of markets large enough to consume print editions in the tens or hundreds of thousands. Despite the fragmentation of the population and the initial absence of an artistic infrastructure, the U. S. proved a fertile ground for mass art. The country rapidly became an innovative locus for advances in the commodification of pictures and in their instrumentalization for purposes of marketing, political persuasion, the circulation of information, education, andentertainment.
                                                                      ARTH 580-401 SEX & POSTMODERN ART KATZ, JONATHAN MEYERSON HALL B5 R 0300PM-0600PM This course is fundamentally concerned with why so many of the defining artists of the postwar generation were queer, indeed such that one could plausibly claim that postmodernism in American art was a queer innovation. Centrally, most of these artists raise the problem, as the above quotes underscore, of authoriality and its discontents. Deploying a combination of social-historical and theoretical texts, we will approach the problem of the disclaiming of authoriality in post war American art, focusing on the works of John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Cy Twombly, Robert Indiana, Louise Nevelson, Ellsworth Kelly, Agnes Martin, Leon Polk Smith and not least Andy Warhol. Central to this course will be the continuing salience of the "death of the author" discourse, pioneered in literature by Barthes and Foucault, and in art by every one of the artists we will be examining. What, in short, is the relationship between the rise of an anti-biographical, anti-authorial theoretical framework, and the lived histories of so many queer authors? In asking this question, we are of course self-consciously violating the very premise of one key strand of postmodernist critique--and in so doing attempting to historicize a theoretical frame that is strikingly resistant to historical analysis. (Undergraduates interested in the course should contact Professor Katz.)
                                                                        ARTH 614-401 ARTS OF CHINA STEINHARDT, NANCY EDUCATION BUILDING 203 MW 1000AM-1100AM The goals of this course are to introduce the major artistic traditions of China, from the Neolithic period to the present and to teach the fundamental methods of the discipline of art history. Our approaches will be chronological, considering how the arts developed in and through history, and thematic, discussing how art and architecture were used for philosophical, religious and material ends. Topics of study will include: Shang bronzes: Han concepts of the afterlife; the impact of Buddhism; patronage and painting; the landscape tradition; the concept of the literatus; architecture and garden design; the "modern" and 20th-century artistic practices; among others.
                                                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                          ARTH 622-401 ART OF ANCIENT IRAN PITTMAN, HOLLY JAFFE BUILDING 113 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age.
                                                                            ARTH 635-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD CANCELED A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                              ARTH 661-401 NORTHERN RENAISSANCE ART BRISMAN, SHIRA JAFFE BUILDING 113 TR 1030AM-1200PM Survey of the principal developments in Northern Europe during the "early modern" period, i.e. the transition from medieval to modern art-making during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Principal attention to painting and graphics with additional consideration of developments in sculpture, particularly in the regions of the Netherlands and German-speaking Europe. Attention focused on the works of the following artists: Van Eyck, Bosch, Durer, Holbein, Bruegel, and on topics such as the rise of pictorial genres, urban art markets, Reformation art and art for the dynastic courts of emerging nation-states.
                                                                                ARTH 667-401 LATIN AMERICAN ART CASTRO, MARK CANCELED The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina.
                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                  ARTH 670-401 THE MODERN CITY BROWNLEE, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING B17 MWF 1100AM-1200PM A study of the European and American city in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the history of architecture and urban design; political, sociological, and economic factors also receive attention. The class considers the development of London, St. Petersburg, Washington, Boston, Paris, Vienna and Philadelphia.
                                                                                    ARTH 674-601 FACING AMERICA SCHMENNER, WILLIAM JAFFE BUILDING B17 W 0530PM-0830PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.
                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                      ARTH 676-401 IMPRESSIONISM DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE STITELER HALL B21 TR 0300PM-0430PM Impressionism opened the pictorial field to light, perception, science, modernity, bourgeoise leisure and famously the material qualities of paint itself. This course will survey the movement's major contexts and proponents--Manet, Monet, Morisot, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin--from its origins in the 1860's to its demise in the 1890's, as well as its subsequent adaptions throughout the world until World War I. Particular attention is paid to the artists' critical reception and the historical conditions which allowed one nation, France, to claim the emergence of early Modernism so firmly for itself. The course also analyzes the effects of the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Paris, and its affects on artistic developments. We also look outside of France's borders to Germany and Britain.
                                                                                        ARTH 723-401 TOP IN ART/ANC NEAR EAST: URBANIZATION IN EARLY MESOPOTAMIA: THEORY, THEMES, AND EVIDENCE PITTMAN, HOLLY JAFFE BUILDING 104 T 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies. Fall 2019: During the short period of the Neo Sumerian Empire at the end of the third millennium BCE, Mesopotamian concepts of kingship were crystallized through images, buildings, and textual creations. This seminar will examine this central institution from many points of view that invite cross historical and cross-cultural consideration.
                                                                                          ARTH 761-301 TOPICS IN N. REN ART: CONCEPTS OF AUTHORSHIP IN THE EARLY-MODERN ERA BRISMAN, SHIRA T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies from semester to semester. Fall 2019: One of the primary concerns of those who study works of art is who made it. In the early modern period, artists were also concerned with this question, and found innovative ways to assert authorship by stamping their works with monograms and signatures, securing rights to intellectual property, and launching lawsuits against each other. While the death of the author has long been asserted in literary theory and has consequentially urged art historical approaches to think beyond concepts of artistic genius and authorial voice, questions of authorship and workshop practice are still necessary to the establishment of the basic biographies of objects. This seminar explores how these various approaches may work together by combining close readings of primary-source documents, theoretical approaches to concepts of authorship, and object-based studies in different media represented in the Philadelphia Museum of Art: paintings, prints, drawings, textiles, architecture, decorative arts, and armor.
                                                                                            ARTH 781-301 TOPICS IN 20TH C. ARCH: ROBERT VENTURI AND DENISE SCOTT BROWN BROWNLEE, DAVID CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. For the Fall 2019 semester, this research seminar will be devoted to the writing, architecture, and city planning of two of the most important designers of recent history. Full use will be made of their papers in the Penn architectural Archives. Open to graduate students only.
                                                                                              ARTH 794-401 TPCS IN CONTEMPORARY ART: PHOTO-PAINTING SILVERMAN, KAJA JAFFE BUILDING 113 M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Fall 2019: "When industry erupts in the sphere of art," Baudelaire famously wrote in 1859, "it becomes the latter's mortal enemy, and in the resulting confusion of functions none is well carried out...If photography is allowed to deputize for art in some of art's activities, it will not be long before it has supplanted or corrupted art altogether...Photography must, therefore, return to its true duty, which is handmaid of the arts and sciences." History has not been kind to this argument. First, Henry Fox Talbot and many of his contemporaries attributed the photographic image to nature, not industry, and the same is true of a number of contemporary artists. Second, by 1842--three years after the official invention of photography--photographers had already begun hand-coloring their daguerreotypes, and a century and a half later Richter started smearing and spattering paint onto small photographs, and exhibiting them along with his abstract and figurative paintings. By the mid-1850's, many artists were also painting from photographs, sometimes by projecting them onto their canvases, and treating these projections as preparatory drawings. They called the resulting images photo-paintings. And although it became increasingly "disreputable" to work in this way as the century progressed, Eugene Delacroix, Gustave Courbet, Edouard Manet, Henri Fantin-Latour, Edgar Degas and Edouard Vuillard all made paintings that are in one way or another photographic. Some of them also saw photography as the gateway to a new kind of figurative painting. Abstraction hardened the distinction between art and photography, and brought these medium-crossings to an end, but photo-painting resurfaced in the 1950s and 1960s, and although it initially seemed ironic, it has outlived the movements that made this reading possible. As we can now see, it is a far more complex and multi-faceted way of making pictures than those generally associated with Pop, Institutional Critique and Appropriation--one in which the world participates, and from which we have much to learn. We will explore work by Gerhard Richter, Richard Hamilton, Corinne Wasmuht, Luc Tuymans, Marlene Dumas, and others.
                                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT