Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 008-301 CONTEMP MUSEUM PRACTICE CANCELED This course introduces students to key issues in art museum practice. Students will meet with active and innovative members of the contemporary art world, at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, and off-campus.
    CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
    ARTH 100-301 IMPRESSIONISM: LOOKING, PAINTING, MODERNITY DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE T 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies. Fall 2018: As life in the nineteenth century sped up, so did the century's art. Painting in "fifteen minutes," as the critic Jules Laforgue described Impressionism in 1883, characterized a novel kind of picture built of hectic, freewheeling signs. Impressionism thus chronicled the profound cultural shifts of its era; its blurs and unfinished appearance made movement and a particularly modern sense of time and vision its chief subjects. This seminar seeks to understand these developments by establishing an account of Impressionism that fits our current global, multimedia and multidisciplinary forms of humanistic thought. To this end, we will read those recent scholars who place Impressionism within new contexts that include the history of science and technology (visual perception, psychology, evolution, chemistry), political history and theory (republicanism, revolution, empire, nationalism), and consumer culture (fashion, capitalism), among others. This course will of course also survey the movement's major contexts and proponents-Manet, Monet, Degas, Morisot, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin-from its origins in the 1860s to its demise in the 1890s, as well as its subsequent adaptations throughout the world until World War I. In short, Impressionism revolutionized the Western easel format, an aesthetic paradigm shift that every art historical generation since the late nineteenth-century has grappled with anew. Continuing this tradition, this course proposes to study the newest and most wide-ranging research on Impressionism available to date.
      FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
      ARTH 101-001 PREHISTORY - RENAISSANCE: INTRO TO WESTERN ART GUERIN, SARAH MW 1000AM-1100AM This is a double introduction: to looking at the visual arts; and, to the ancient and medieval cities and empires of three continents - ancient Egypt, the Middle East and Iran, the Minoan and Mycenaean Bronze Age, the Greek and Roman Mediterranean, and the early Islamic, early Byzantine and western Medieval world. Using images, contemporary texts, and art in our city, we examine the changing forms of art, architecture and landscape architecture, and the roles of visual culture for political, social and religious activity.
        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
        ARTH 106-001 ARCHITECT AND HISTORY ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA MW 0100PM-0200PM Human experience is shaped by the built environment. This course introduces students to the interrelated fields of architecture, art history, and engineering and explores great architectural monuments from the ancient to the modern period, from India across the Mediterranean and Europe to the US. The focus will be on understanding these works in their structure and function, both as products of individual ingenuity and reflections of Zeitgeist. Questioning these monuments from a present-day perspective across the cultures will be an important ingredient, as will be podium discussions, guest lectures, excursions, and all kinds of visualizations, from digital walk-throughs to practical design exercises. Regularly taught in fall term, this course fulfills Sector IV, Humanities and Social Science, and it satisfies History of Art 100-level course requirements.
          Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
          ARTH 107-401 TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA MUKHERJEE, RAHUL MW 0200PM-0330PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project.
            ARTH 108-601 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 CORTEZ, CESAR T 0500PM-0800PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              ARTH 109-401 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES CORRIGAN, TIMOTHY TR 0900AM-1030AM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ARTH 211-401 ART IN INDIA GHOSH, PIKA CANCELED Colonialism, as Edward Said pointed out, "is impelled by impressive ideological formations that include notions that certain territories and people¿require and beseech domination, as well as forms of knowledge affiliated with domination" (1994). While acknowledging his groundbreaking intervention, subsequent scholarship significantly complicated the binaries and relationships embedded and naturalized in the very ways we approach this material. An important revisionist position, for example, was staked out by the Subaltern Studies project of writing history from below. ¿¿Recent scholarship nuances the dominance and subordination model, calling attention to the many entanglements between power and difference. This course explores these approaches with a focus on the transnational urban center that emerged in the colonial capital of Calcutta during complex period of the East India Company's expansion and subsequent imperial consolidation of the Indian subcontinent. From architecture to embroidery, a range of visual and performance practices set powerful transformations in motion.¿¿We will explore these strategies to attend to the textures and traces of a vibrant historical juncture.
                  ARTH 227-401 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology BOWES, KIMBERLY MW 1000AM-1100AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ARTH 230-401 THE MATERIAL WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE
                    JANSEN, JAN
                    DIBBLE, HAROLD
                    TR 1030AM-1200PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221 will take place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.
                      CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                      ARTH 232-401 BYZANTINE ART & ARCH OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT CANCELED This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium-a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium s interactions with neighboring cultures.
                        ARTH 267-401 LATIN AMERICAN ART SHAW, GWENDOLYN
                        KIM, DAVID
                        TR 1030AM-1200PM The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina.
                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          ARTH 276-401 IMPRESSIONISM DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE MW 1200PM-0100PM Impressionism opened the pictorial field to light, perception, science, modernity, bourgeoise leisure and famously the material qualities of paint itself. This course will survey the movement's major contexts and proponents--Manet, Monet, Morisot, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin--from its origins in the 1860's to its demise in the 1890's, as well as its subsequent adaptions throughout the world until World War I. Particular attention is paid to the artists' critical reception and the historical conditions which allowed one nation, France, to claim the emergence of early Modernism so firmly for itself. The course also analyzes the effects of the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Paris, and its affects on artistic developments. We also look outside of France's borders to Germany and Britain.
                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                            ARTH 285-001 MODERN ART: AFRICA AND EUROPE ROACH, IMANI TR 1200PM-0130PM Fall 2018: The history of modern art is closely tied to and largely unfolds from the history of Western Imperialism. While the technologies made possible by colonial resource extraction produced new ways of looking, modern conceptions of the self and how to represent it developed in dialogue with racialized notions of the other. This course focuses on encounters between the cultures of Africa and Europe, from 1880 to 1960, and on the visual practices that emerged on both continents as a result. Topics of special interest will include racial difference and the birth of photography, colonial masquerade, impressionism, symbols of power in royal arts, cubism, mass marketing and colonial self-fashioning, West African studio photography, world's fairs and the Musee de l'Homme, Dada and surrealism, Negritude and interwar Paris, anti-aesthetics, colonial arts education, National art schools in the age of African independence, humanism and South African photography under Apartheid.
                              ARTH 288-601 MODERN DESIGN MARCUS, GEORGE W 0600PM-0900PM Modern Design surveys the development of useful and decorative objects from the rise of modernism at the beginning of the nineteenth century to its rejection in postmodernism toward the end of the century, from the early stages of industrial technology to recent advances in digital technology, from Tiffany glass and tubular-metal furniture to the iPhone and other products of today. Its overall approach focuses on the aesthetics of designed objects and on their designers, as well as on how we talk about and critique them, but the course also investigates the relationship of design and industrialization, technology, sustainability, individual needs, and the expression of societal values.
                                ARTH 289-401 TOPICS FILM STUDIES: GLOBAL GENRES MAZAJ, META TR 0300PM-0430PM This course is an exploration of multiple forces that explain the growth, global spread and institutionalization of international film festivals. The global boom in film industry has resulted in an incredible proliferation of film festivals taking place all around the world, and festivals have become one of the biggest growth industries. A dizzying convergence site of cinephilia, media spectacle, business agendas and geopolitical purposes, film festivals offer a fruitful ground on which to investigate the contemporary global cinema network. Film festivals will be approached as a site where numerous lines of the world cinema map come together, from culture and commerce, experimentation and entertainment, political interests and global business patterns. To analyze the network of film festivals, we will address a wide range of issues, including historical and geopolitical forces that shape the development of festivals, festivals as an alternative marketplace, festivals as a media event, programming/agenda setting, prizes, cinephilia, and city marketing. Individual case studies of international film festivals-Cannes, Berlin, Venice, Rotterdam, Karlovy Vary, Toronto, Sundance among others-will enable us to address all these diverse issues but also to establish a theoretical framework with which to approach the study of film festivals. For students planning to attend the Penn-in-Cannes program, this course provides an excellent foundation that will prepare you for the on-site experience of the King of all festivals.
                                  ARTH 300-301 UNDERGRAD METHODS SEM: Undergraduate Methods Seminar KUTTNER, ANN W 0330PM-0630PM Topic varies. This course, required for history of art majors, acquaints students with a wide variety of historical and contemporary approachees to studying art, architecture, material culture, and visual culture.
                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                    ARTH 305-401 SPIEGEL-WILKS SEMINAR: ARS MORIENDI: LIFE AND DEATH IN EARLY PHOTOGRAPHY LEVY, AARON M 0200PM-0500PM Fall 2018: Susan Sontag once remarked that "We no longer study the art of dying,...but all eyes, at rest, contain that knowledge. The body knows. And the camera shows, inexorably." This Spiegel-Wilks Curatorial Seminar explores the invention of photography and the proliferation of techniques and processes of representing the body in the 1800s. Offered in collaboration with the Barnes Foundation, and co-taught with Executive Director and President Thom Collins, the course will pay particular attention to the relation between photography, science and medicine, and new modes of representing life and death. In addition to being introduced to the history of photography, students will learn about the curatorial process and contribute to a forthcoming exhibition at the Barnes Foundation, where the course will meet weekly. Students will have the opportunity to interact with curators and scholars at the museum, and also engage Penn Medicine faculty who are pioneering new ways of imaging the body. Our discussions will build upon seminal texts by Roland Barthes, Geoffrey Batchen, Jonathan Crary, Kaja Silverman, Susan Sontag, and others. As part of the course, students will also conduct research and contribute curatorial writing for the exhibition.
                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                      ARTH 322-401 TOP: MESOPOTAM ART/ARCHT: A Retroactive Theory for Mesopotamian Architecture CANCELED Topic varies. Fall 2018: How can we reconstruct architectural concepts and ideas in historical contexts in which architects did not make these explicit? The standard approach has been to make comparisons with buildings that are as similar in time, function, and place as possible. The results of this approach have not been very satisfactory. This course is an experiment in creating a different type of architectural history. We will use modern architectural theories as a framework, explore their Philadelphian applications, while focusing on the architecture of ancient Syria, Iraq and Iran, the region where the world s first urban civilizations arose. This course is about asking different questions and finding new topics to explore. Each class explores a topic such as the similarity of cities and buildings, the constitutive role of ornament, and the tectonics of mud. Students will undertake a final project that draws on contemporary architectural theory to analyze architecture from Mesopotamia.
                                        ARTH 324-401 DRESS & FASHION IN AFRCA ALI-DINAR, ALI TR 0300PM-0430PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that s influenced by the surrounding forces.
                                          ARTH 336-601 TOPICS IN GLOBAL CITIES COBB, ELVAN M 0530PM-0830PM The 19th-century reformulation of cities around the world forms the foundation for many of our own contemporary urban experiences. In this course, we will explore the dynamics of urbanism in the modern era through a global, comparative perspective that approaches cities as increasingly connected and networked places. Our examination of the large-scale physical transformation of cities will cover topics such as the shifting discourses on urban design, infrastructure, food provisioning, urban health, and nightlife.¿ From the context of colonial ambitions, we will explore the political development of urban institutions such as museums, zoos, and botanical gardens.¿ This course will also examine the roles of race, gender, and class in the varied experiences of urban life. We then turn our attention to new cities of the 19th and the early 20th centuries, including unmaterialized utopias, company towns regulated to maximize profits, religious enclaves, and new capitals with political agendas. Our exploration will take us to cities around the world, including Barcelona, Beirut, Cairo, Canberra, Casablanca, Chicago, Damascus, Istanbul, New York, Paris, Shanghai, Singapore, St.Petersburg, and beyond.¿¿
                                            ARTH 339-401 SACRED STUFF: Religious Bodies, Spaces, and Things SCHAEFER, DONOVAN TR 0430PM-0600PM Does religion start with what's in our heads? Or are religious commitments made, shaped and strengthened by the people, places, and things around us? This course will explore how religion happens in the material world. We'll start with classical and contemporary theories on the relationship of religion to stuff. We'll then consider examples of how religion is animated not just by texts, but through interactions with objects, spaces, bodies, monuments, color, design, architecture, and film. We'll ask how these material expressions of religion move beyond private faith and connect religion to politics and identity.
                                              ARTH 343-301 TPCS IN MEDIEVAL/REN ART: THE MANUSCRIPT BOOK IN THE 21ST CENTURY PORTER, DOROTHY
                                              NOEL, WILLIAM
                                              R 0130PM-0430PM Fall 2018: This course is designed to introduce students of both the digital humanities and manuscript studies to the concepts and realities of working with medieval manuscripts in the twenty-first century. Through the course, students and faculty will examine materials from the collections of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts, as well as digitized versions of those materials and others. ¿ Students in the course will consider four issues relating to using medieval manuscripts in a digital world. The first issue is theoretical, considering the relationship between medieval manuscripts and their digital counterparts, and questioning the notion of digital surrogacy. What does digital surrogacy mean and how might it affect our consideration of the physical objects represented through the surrogate? The second issue is the practical one of imbuing best practices when creating digital assets out of medieval manuscripts. If we are to digitize manuscripts, how can we ensure that those digital versions are the best they can be? And again: what does that mean? The third issue concerns the present landscape for digital medieval manuscripts (and medieval studies more generally), including current publication technologies and the place of Open Data. The fourth issue is that of building resources with and for digitized medieval manuscripts. What tools are available to enable us to create something new?
                                                ARTH 387-401 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AMERICAN ANIMATION SIMENSKY, LINDA M 0430PM-0730PM This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Animation. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. Fall 2018: This course will look at American animation as an art form, an industry and a variety of technologies and approaches. We will explore the ways in which artistic, technical, historical, and cultural conditions shape the development of animation and in turn, how animation impacts viewers. Topics will include trends in animation and their relation to contemporary popular culture, issues of art versus commerce in the creation of cartoons, the intersection of animation and politics, and shifts in style and technique throughout the years. We will look at the figures in animation who have shaped the art form and continue to influence it, the rise in animation's popularity, and current-day applications of animated imagery. Case studies will include Pixar, Walt Disney, UPA, television cartoons, stop motion animation, and the movie, Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
                                                  ARTH 391-401 TOPICS FILM HISTORY: AMERICAN INDEPENDENTS MAZAJ, META TR 1200PM-0130PM Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                                    ARTH 395-401 PERFORMING HISTORY ST.GEORGE, ROBERT R 0130PM-0430PM This seminar concentrates on the ways that various peoples in the world make their history by means other than relying on written texts alone. Over the course of the semester, we therefore may be examining such different public events and civic rituals as parades, political and religious processions, local historical pageants, carnivals, historic preservation, museums, military reenactments, and history theme parks. The emphasis in each of these forms, places, and semiotic processes will be on their identity and function as key performances that transform consciousness, shift individuals alternately into both actors and spectators, reframe the everyday as the metaphysical, and intensify the status of cultural values in the histories they present to view.
                                                      ARTH 501-301 SOY CUBA / I AM CUBA: THE CONTEMPORARY LANDSCAPES OF ROGER TOLEDO BUENO SHAW, GWENDOLYN R 0130PM-0430PM Curatorial seminars expose students to the complexity of studying and working with objects in the context of public display. With the guidance of faculty and museum professionals, students learn what it means to curate an exhibition, create catalogues and gallery text, and/or develop programming for exhibitions of art and visual/material culture. Fall 2018: In 1964, "Soy Cuba," a collaboration between Cuban and Soviet filmmakers was released. Now considered a masterpiece of avant garde art, the film uses the backdrop of the island's agrarian landscape,urban slums, Spanish colonial architecture, and modern highrises to dramatize the dire social and economic conditions that led up to the Cuban Revolution of the 1950s. Using the film as an anchor, we will study the artistic depiction of Cuba¿since the 1750s, while organizing an exhibition of contemporary Cuban landscape painting for the Arthur Ross Gallery. Permission of instructor required.
                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                        ARTH 505-640 MLA PROSEMINAR: FAKE SHAW, GWENDOLYN CANCELED Topic varies. Fall 2017: This course examines they way that issues of universal, global, and national identity have been negotiated and challenged in art and visual culture. It also aims to give students an introduction to the various theories and methodological practices that have been used to critique and explain these images and objects since the end of WWII.
                                                          ARTH 515-401 TOPICS IN JAPANESE ART: UKIYO-E: BEYOND THE GREAT WAVE DAVIS, JULIE R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Fall 2018: This course will consider Japanese woodblock prints, illustrated books, and paintings from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Topics include: the formation of "Ukiyo-e" or "the pictures of the floating world" as a genre; the development of the publishing system and its audience; specific artists and their works; the reception of Japanese prints in Europe and America; the modern reinvention of the woodblock print; and others.¿ We will also make extensive use of the collections held in the Kislak Center, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and in other local collections. Assignments may include: close study of a single work; web page development; research paper; regular participation in discussions.
                                                            ARTH 525-401 TOPICS: GREEK/ROMAN ART: BORDERLINES: ROMAN PROVINCIAL ART KUTTNER, ANN T 0130PM-0430PM Topics Varies. Fall 2018: "Roman Provincial Art" is a very active scholarly category: we test how it might be productive, sampling visual culture outside the empire's Italian heartland from the Late Republic into Late Antiquity. Rome's arts were always in dialogue with those of neighboring cultures; imperialist expansion into the Mediterranean world and beyond meant that cultural relations across many boundaries--social, ethic, territorial--potentially became cultural politics. Of related interest are relationships between visual and material culture within the Roman world's formal boundaries, in proto-global and imperial contexts, and those of peoples along and beyond those frontiers. (In Late Antiquity some of them took up rule within the old imperial boundaries, and came to cultural terms with their new lands.) "Style" is a fraught issue: what does attributed crudeness in regional practice add up to, and what were the aims of apparently trans-Mediterranean forms of display? Do "arts" engage identity formation, enforced or discrepant viewing? To analyze relations between the empire's local and "international" visual cultures's is to critique models of Romanization, center-periphery and network interaction, cultural fusion, translation and hybridity, creole and subaltern studies. It is also a glimpse, often, into the economies and production of art and artifacts as consumable goods, and the social and cultural phenomenon of taste.
                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                              ARTH 538-401 TOPICS:ART OF AL-ANDALUS: TEXTILES: DESIGN, TRADE, MEANING FELICIANO, MARIA R 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies. Fall 2018: The course will focus on the production, consumption, and trade of textiles in Islamic Spain from the ninth through the fifteenth centuries. We will explore the place of Islamic Spain within the greater context of Islamic art historical studies, the impact of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century collecting (and dispersing) practices, and will work from case studies to highlight the multiplicity of approaches used in the study of the Andalusi textile worlds. A special focus of the class will be the routes of exchange and the myriad symbolical uses of textiles across the Islamic and Christian divides in the Iberian Peninsula as well as throughout the commercial routes of the Mediterranean and Central Asia.
                                                                ARTH 583-401 ART SEX AND THE SIXTIES T 0300PM-0600PM With a distinct emphasis on post World War II performance, film, sculpture and painting, this course explores the conjunction of the period's systematic revamping of our social/sexual schema with the equally revolutionary ascendancy of an artistic postmodernity. And it seeks to explore this dynamic not only within the familiar confines of North America and Europe but towards Latin America and Asia, too, in what was a nearly simultaneous emergence of the erotic as a political force in the 60s. Reading a range of key voices from Brazilian theorist and poet Oswald de Andrade to Frankfurt School philosopher Herbert Marcuse, performance artists Carolee Schneemann, and Yoko Ono, Neo-Freudian theorist Norman O. Brown and lesbian feminist author Monique Wittig, we will examine how and why sex became a privileged form of politics at this historical juncture in a range of different contexts across the globe. Students interested in feminist, gender or queer theory, social revolution, performance studies, post war art and Frankfurt School thought should find the course particularly appealing, but it assumes no background in any of these fields.
                                                                  ARTH 611-401 ART IN INDIA GHOSH, PIKA CANCELED Colonialism, as Edward Said pointed out, "is impelled by impressive ideological formations that include notions that certain territories and people¿require and beseech domination, as well as forms of knowledge affiliated with domination" (1994). While acknowledging his groundbreaking intervention, subsequent scholarship significantly complicated the binaries and relationships embedded and naturalized in the very ways we approach this material.¿¿An important revisionist position, for example, was staked out by the Subaltern Studies project of writing history from below. ¿¿Recent scholarship nuances the dominance and subordination model, calling attention to the many entanglements between power and difference. This course explores these approaches with a focus on the transnational urban center that emerged in the colonial capital of Calcutta during complex period of the East India Company's expansion and subsequent imperial consolidation of the Indian subcontinent. From architecture to embroidery, a range of visual and performance practices set powerful transformations in motion.¿¿We will explore these strategies to attend to the textures and traces of a vibrant historical juncture.
                                                                    ARTH 632-401 BYZANTINE ART & ARCH OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT CANCELED This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium s interactions with neighboring cultures.
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                      ARTH 667-401 LATIN AMERICAN ART SHAW, GWENDOLYN
                                                                      KIM, DAVID
                                                                      TR 1030AM-1200PM The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina.
                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                        ARTH 676-401 IMPRESSIONISM DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE MW 1200PM-0100PM Impressionism opened the pictorial field to light, perception, science, modernity, bourgeoise leisure and famously the material qualities of paint itself. This course will survey the movement's major contexts and proponents--Manet, Monet, Morisot, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin--from its origins in the 1860's to its demise in the 1890's, as well as its subsequent adaptions throughout the world until World War I. Particular attention is paid to the artists' critical reception and the historical conditions which allowed one nation, France, to claim the emergence of early Modernism so firmly for itself. The course also analyzes the effects of the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Paris, and its affects on artistic developments. We also look outside of France's borders to Germany and Britain.
                                                                          ARTH 720-401 TOPICS IN AEGEAN ART: MORTUARY PRACTICES IN THE AEGEAN BRONZE AGE SHANK, ELIZABETH M 1000AM-0100PM Topic varies. Fall 2018: The choices made by groups of people with regard to the treatment of their dead can be reflective of a society s beliefs and social structure. In this course, we will examine the burial traditions of the people of the Prehistoric Aegean from the Neolithic through the end of the Bronze Age, circa 7,000-1,100 BCE. We will focus on burial architecture, grave goods, burial rituals, mortuary variability, and the symbolic meaning of death and burial in Prehistoric Greece. Particular attention will be paid to recent discoveries on Crete, the Mainland, and the Cycladic islands. Students will write two papers, and these papers will be presented to the class. The first paper will be circa 15 pages long with footnotes, bibliography, and images (presented via powerpoint) and the second will be a 20-25 page paper with footnotes, bibliography, and images presented via powerpoint.
                                                                            ARTH 740-301 TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ART: MEDIEVAL MATERIALS: EXPERIMENT, INNOVATION AND FAILURE GUERIN, SARAH W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Fall 2018: This seminar will examine the intersection between technique, medium and desire in the Middle Ages. The questions of what spurs or instigates technical change, what means an artist/artisan deploys to achieve the longed-for result, and what happens in the face of failure will organize our discussions. In order to interrogate these topics, we will read rather broadly across the history of art and the history of science, touching on periods adjacent to the Middle Ages. The course will incorporate selective hands-on learning experiences to enrich our inquiry.
                                                                              ARTH 750-401 TOPICS IN S. REN ART: THE FIELD OF PAINTING HERMAN, NICHOLAS
                                                                              KIM, DAVID
                                                                              R 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies. Fall 2018: This innovative course will explore the cross-fertilization between manuscript illumination and other media such as wall-painting, panel painting, architecture, sculpture, and stained glass across the early modern world, 1300-1600. We will consider such topics as: intermediality, artistic transfer, miniature vs. monumental, workshop practice, patronage, and the nascent art market. Students will have the rare opportunity to see and handle manuscripts held in area collections such as the Kislak Center and the Free Library of Philadelphia. This course is open to all students who are interested in artistic practice, the historical dimensions of media, and the social function of art. Our seminar will be coordinated with the Annual Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies (November 15-17, 2018), which will bring together an international group of experts in the field.¿
                                                                                ARTH 774-300 JAPAN AND PARIS DAVIS, JULIE F 1000AM-1200PM 2018 marks the 150-year anniversary of the founding of the Meiji era in 1868, a moment marked as the official "opening" of Japan to trade with Europen powers and of Japan's rapid industrialization. Trade and expositions promoted Japan and its art abroad, and dealers, critics, artists, and others avidly responded, in a trend that came to be known as Japonisme. In this course we will consider how Japanese art was collected and imitated abroad (Japan in Paris) as well as how Japanese artistic practices transformed between 1868 and the Great Kant¿ earthquake of 1923 through the adaptation of European modernism (Paris in Japan). Our course will take advantage of this anniversary by participating in a symposium here at Penn, mounting our own pop-up mini-exhibition, and traveling to Paris to analyze how Japan remains visible there in the present. Restricted to History of Art graduate students and by permission only.
                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                  ARTH 794-401 TPCS IN CONTEMPORARY ART: PICTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHY SILVERMAN, KAJA M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Fall 2018: Since it was not translated into English until the mid 1960s, Walter Benjamin s Work of Art essay was slow to arrive in the English-speaking world, and when it did, it seemed part of the same zeitgeist as Guy Debord s The Society of the Spectacle, Roland Barthes The Rhetoric of the Image, and Louis Althusser s Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses. This zeitgeist was deeply suspicious of popular images, and this suspicion was soon fortified from a feminist direction by Laura Mulvey s Visual pleasure and Narrative Cinema, and a postcolonial one by Frantz Fanon s Black Skin, White Masks. Benjamin s essay extended it to the kinds of images we generally find in museums, i.e., to what I will be calling pictures. This made the museum the primary target of institutional critique, and gave rise to what Hal Foster called the anti-aesthetic. It was against this backdrop that the so-called Pictures Generation emerged. This category was helpful at first, since it allowed us to look at things that would otherwise have been forbidden. It was based, however, on a misapprehension: the misapprehension that a picture means the same thing for Jeff Wall as it does for Cindy Sherman. This course will proceed from the assumption that there is more to a museum than the aura, and more to a picture than the beauty that Benjamin so scathingly derides. Since it was through Wall s work that I first realized how important pictures are, he will have a central place in this course. There are, however, many other players in this drama, as well, some of whom offer very different accounts of pictorial photography, but all of whom seem to think that it is more than a blip on the screen of art history. This is, I believe, because the stakes are not just aesthetic, intellectual and political, but also ontological. Pictorial photography is an important chapter within a larger narrative the narrative of our relationship to the world. And since this chapter began in 1839, that is also where this this seminar will start.