Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 102-401 WORLD ART: 1400 TO NOW: Introduction to Western Art, 1400-Present DAVIS, JULIE
DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
WF 1200PM-0100PM This course is an introduction to the visual arts in a global context over the period from the early 1400s to the present. The content of the class varies according to the expertise of the instructors but will introduce students to selected and significant moments in artistic production in both the Western and Eastern hemispheres. Offering a broad historical overview of key techniques, movements, and artists, this course will cover aspects of art production around the world during an era of increasing economic exchange, colonization, and industrialization. Looking at painting, sculpture, architecture, and prints, as well as new media such as photography and film, the course will respond to the following questions: How does artistic practice change in this period? Who owns art? What is the role of the artist in society, and where is art made, exhibited, and consumed? Other topics to be covered are art's crucial role in the period's political debates and social transformations, including modernization and technological advances, as well as art criticism's import in forming public opinion. An introduction to art history, this course offers a wholly new perspective on the arts and cultures in this era of artistic innovation.
    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
    ARTH 103-401 ART & CIV IN EAST ASIA STEINHARDT, NANCY MW 1000AM-1100AM Introduction to major artistic traditions of China and Japan and to the methodological practices of art history. Attention given to key cultural concepts and ways of looking, in such topics as: concepts of the afterlife and its representation; Buddhist arts and iconography; painting styles and subjects; and more broadly at the transmission of styles and cultural practices across East Asia. Serves as an introduction to upper level lecture courses in East Asian art history cultures. If size of class permits, certain sessions will be held in the Penn Museum or the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
      ARTH 107-401 TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA MUKHERJEE, RAHUL W 0200PM-0500PM How and when do media become digital? What does digitization afford and what is lost as television and cinema become digitized? As lots of things around us turn digital, have we started telling stories, sharing experiences, and replaying memories differently? What has happened to television and life after New Media ? How have television audiences been transformed by algorithmic cultures of Netflix and Hulu? How have (social) media transformed socialities as ephemeral snaps and swiped intimacies become part of the "new" digital/phone cultures? This is an introductory survey course and we discuss a wide variety of media technologies and phenomena that include: cloud computing, Internet of Things, trolls, distribution platforms, optical fiber cables, surveillance tactics, social media, and race in cyberspace. We also examine emerging mobile phone cultures in the Global South and the environmental impact of digitization. Course activities include Tumblr blog posts and Instagram curations. The final project could take the form of either a critical essay (of 2000 words) or a media project.
        ARTH 108-401 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 MAZAJ, META TR 0300PM-0430PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 108-601 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 LESNIK, PETER W 0500PM-0800PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            ARTH 109-401 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES TR 0130PM-0300PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
              ARTH 109-601 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES LESNIK, PETER TR 0430PM-0600PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                ARTH 209-601 AFRICAN ART ROACH, IMANI W 0500PM-0800PM This selective survey examines a variety of the circumstances of sub-Saharan African art, ranging from imperial to nomadic cultures and from ancient times to contemporary participation in the international market. Iconography, themes and style will be considered, as will questions of modernity, religious impact, tradition and colonialism.
                  ARTH 226-401 HELL & ROM ART/ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN TR 1200PM-0130PM This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.
                    ARTH 228-401 GREEK ARCH & URBANISM ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA TR 1030AM-1200PM As the locus of classical architecture and urbanism, the Greek world occupies an important place in the history of architecture and urbanism. This course explores the various periods and different moments of architectural creation during the first two millennia, from the palace complexes of Minoan Crete to the cities of the Hellenistic world (1600-100 BCE), and tackles major concepts, theories and practices of architectural and urban design. In studying a variety of sources - both ancient and modern - lectures examine concepts of organizing space, issues of structure, materials, decoration and proportion. The purpose of the course is to shed light on Greek architectural and urban projects within their social, political, religious, and physical contexts.
                      ARTH 235-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD BOOMER, MEGAN MW 0500PM-0630PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                        ARTH 240-401 MEDIEVAL ART BOOMER, MEGAN MWF 0100PM-0200PM An introductory survey, this course investigates architecture, painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students become familiar with selected major monuments of the Romanesque and Gothic periods, primarily in Western Europe as well as relevant sites around the Mediterranean. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects and monuments. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the role of luxury in the medieval west; the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.
                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                          ARTH 273-601 HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY VERSHBOW, GREGORY R 0600PM-0900PM A history of world photography from 1839 to the present and its relation to cultural contexts as well as to various theories of the functions of images. Topics discussed in considering the nineteenth century will be the relationship between photography and painting, the effect of photography on portraiture, photography in the service of exploration, and photography as practiced by anthropologists; and in considering the twentieth century, photography and abstraction, photography as "fine art", photography and the critique of art history, and photography and censorship.
                            ARTH 281-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT BROWNLEE, DAVID MWF 1100AM-1200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ARTH 289-401 TOPICS FILM STUDIES: ROMANTIC COMEDY MAZAJ, META TR 1200PM-0130PM This course is an exploration of multiple forces that explain the growth, global spread and institutionalization of international film festivals. The global boom in film industry has resulted in an incredible proliferation of film festivals taking place all around the world, and festivals have become one of the biggest growth industries. A dizzying convergence site of cinephilia, media spectacle, business agendas and geopolitical purposes, film festivals offer a fruitful ground on which to investigate the contemporary global cinema network. Film festivals will be approached as a site where numerous lines of the world cinema map come together, from culture and commerce, experimentation and entertainment, political interests and global business patterns. To analyze the network of film festivals, we will address a wide range of issues, including historical and geopolitical forces that shape the development of festivals, festivals as an alternative marketplace, festivals as a media event, programming/agenda setting, prizes, cinephilia, and city marketing. Individual case studies of international film festivals-Cannes, Berlin, Venice, Rotterdam, Karlovy Vary, Toronto, Sundance among others-will enable us to address all these diverse issues but also to establish a theoretical framework with which to approach the study of film festivals. For students planning to attend the Penn-in-Cannes program, this course provides an excellent foundation that will prepare you for the on-site experience of the King of all festivals.
                                ARTH 293-401 TOPICS CULTURAL STUDIES: MOBILE PHONE CULTURES MUKHERJEE, RAHUL M 0200PM-0500PM This topic course explores aspects of Film Cultural Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                  ARTH 294-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasinglyimportant exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                                    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                    ARTH 300-301 UNDERGRAD METHODS SEM DRPIC, IVAN W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. This course, required for history of art majors, acquaints students with a wide variety of historical and contemporary approachees to studying art, architecture, material culture, and visual culture.
                                      ARTH 302-301 METHODS OF OBJECT STUDY: UNDERSTANDING WORKS OF ART ON PAPER PRIMEAU, THOMAS M 0200PM-0500PM This seminar introduces students to methods of analyzing the material, physical, and visual aspects of objects in a museum, gallery, or library context. Students will receive training in curatorial practices, as well as close observation and precise descriptive terminology for materials and techniques, and examine essential tools of conservation and technical analysis. For the Spring 2020 semester, this immersive course will stress the importance of developing the visual literacy essential for connoisseurship of works of art on paper. Students will learn to use close observational skills to understand artist's choice, the subtle inherent characteristics of the material and physical aspects of works on paper, their context and significance. The focus will be on examination and discussion of works in the Philadelphia Museum of Art collection and the study of the materials and techniques used by artists from the fifteenth through twenty first centuries. We will begin by considering what questions to ask about a work of art on paper and approaches and tools for looking and informing our answers. Throughout the semester students will engage in direct examination, study, and discourse about the physical characteristics of papers, dry drawing materials, watercolors, inks, and print processes, and their implications for the completed artwork. Condition and other conservation considerations will be addressed. Most sessions will take place in the paper conservation laboratory at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Brief readings for each session will be chosen to educate about the physical aspects of the materials and to stimulate discussion, which will be an important part of the course. Several trips to off-site workshops may be included. Each student will carry out technical examination of two works for written and class presentation. The instructors will be available before or after class or by appointment to continue the discussion and to discuss student projects.
                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                        ARTH 303-401 INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUMS BROWNLEE, DAVID
                                        BROWNLEE, ANN
                                        T 0130PM-0430PM This course introduces students to the history, theory and modern practice of museums. Using the resources of the Penn Museum, the course discusses curatorial practice, education, exhibition design and conservation, while exploring the theoretical and ethical issues confronted by museums. Particularly relevant for those interested in archaeology, anthropology, art history, cultural heritage and public education.
                                          ARTH 308-401 Blackness in Latin American Visual Culture, 16th-19th Centuries MELLING, HELEN MW 0200PM-0330PM The presence of Africans and their descendants produced a complex visual culture in colonial and 19th century Latin America. This course introduces students to a rich body of imagery from the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking Americas in order to explore the multiplicity of meanings ascribed to Blackness across the region; from colonial conceptions rooted in lineage and bloodlines, to the construction of race as an material and biological 'fact' in the 19th century. Sources include the casta paintings of colonial Mexico, fashion and material culture, the popular iconography and print culture forged by costumbrismo, and late 19th century photography. Focusing on several countries including Brazil, Cuba, Mexico and Peru, this seminar provides a thematic exploration of these sources through topics including slavery, citizenship, national identities, religion, self-fashioning and resistance. The aim is to explore how ideas of Blackness were configured, imposed and remade, through representations of Afrodescendants in the visual arts, and the production and use of visual and material culture in Black self-fashioning and collective identities.
                                            ARTH 328-301 THE PARTHENON: THE MANY LIVES OF A MONUMENT ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA R 0130PM-0430PM This seminar focuses on the Parthenon, the centerpiece of Pericles' building programme on the Athenian Acropolis, to address its design and history, its aftermath as a ruin, its anastylosis as a monument as well as its meaning as national and cultural symbol in the modern period. The Parthenon is arguably a monument of perfection - the culmination of the search for the ideal proportions in Doric temple design in the 5th century BCE - and the course will analyze its architecture to shed light on its design and construction processes, including its architectural refinements. We will also address the history of the building as a ruin and the important work of its restoration as a monument after the 19th century, thereby tackling the aesthetics of "purity" intertwined in the planning of interventions on ancient ruins and elucidating the ways in which such interventions are entwined with national and supra-national debates about cultural identity in the discourses of modernity. The seminar will spend a week in Athens in order to study the Parthenon as well as the current work of the Acropolis Restoration Service, whose recent work has shed light on the design and construction of the monument. Finally, the course also aims to map the intellectual agenda of contemporary art practices that engage with the Parthenon and the Athenian Acropolis.
                                              PENN GLOBAL SEMINAR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                              ARTH 339-401 SACRED STUFF: Religious Bodies, Spaces, and Things SCHAEFER, DONOVAN TR 0430PM-0600PM Does religion start with what's in our heads? Or are religious commitments made, shaped and strengthened by the people, places, and things around us? This course will explore how religion happens in the material world. We'll start with classical and contemporary theories on the relationship of religion to stuff. We'll then consider examples of how religion is animated not just by texts, but through interactions with objects, spaces, bodies, monuments, color, design, architecture, and film. We'll ask how these material expressions of religion move beyond private faith and connect religion to politics and identity.
                                                ARTH 389-401 TOPICS FILM STUDIES: CINEMA AND POLITICS BARNARD, RITA MW 0500PM-0630PM This topic course explores aspects of Cinema Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                                  BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                  ARTH 389-402 TOPICS FILM STUDIES: VISUALIZING THE FUTURE TASCHEREAU MAMERS, DANIELLE W 0200PM-0500PM This topic course explores aspects of Cinema Studies intensively. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                                    ARTH 391-401 TOPICS FILM HISTORY: GLOBAL DOCUMENTARY W 0200PM-0500PM Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                                      ARTH 395-401 PERFORMING HISTORY ST.GEORGE, ROBERT R 0130PM-0430PM This seminar concentrates on the ways that various peoples in the world make their history by means other than relying on written texts alone. Over the course of the semester, we therefore may be examining such different public events and civic rituals as parades, political and religious processions, local historical pageants, carnivals, historic preservation, museums, military reenactments, and history theme parks. The emphasis in each of these forms, places, and semiotic processes will be on their identity and function as key performances that transform consciousness, shift individuals alternately into both actors and spectators, reframe the everyday as the metaphysical, and intensify the status of cultural values in the histories they present to view.
                                                        ARTH 433-401 THE PAST PRESERVED: CONSERVATION IN ARCHAEOLOGY GRANT, LYNN T 0130PM-0430PM This course explores the scientific conservation of cultural materials from archaeological contexts. It is intended to familiarize students with the basics of artifact conservation but is not intended to train them as conservators. The course will cover how various materials interact with their deposit environments; general techniques for on-site conservation triage and retrieval of delicate materials; what factors need to be considered in planning for artifact conservation; and related topics. Students should expect to gain a thorough understanding of the role of conservation in archaeology and how the two fields interact.
                                                          ARTH 519-401 ARCHIVING JAZZ BEAVERS, HERMAN M 0200PM-0500PM This seminar will be organized around three distinct pathways. First, it will serve as an introduction to Jazz Studies and thus be attentive to the ways that jazz music has sparked an interdisciplinary conversation that is wide-ranging and ongoing. Second, we will be partnering with the African American Museum of Philadelphia to consider jazz within the realm of visual art. In light of efforts to map the "black interior," how have visual artists (e.g. painters, sculptors, filmmakers, and photographers) sought to represent jazz? Third, we will endeavor to develop partnerships with the Philadelphia (and beyond) jazz community, especially as it pertains to creating and sustaining an archive that serves as way to understand jazz as an instrument of placemaking and also as a vehicle for jazz musicians to take ownership of their narratives. The seminar will meet at the African American Museum of Philadelphia and be team taught with members of the Museum staff. The course will culminate with a virtual exhibit of visual works and archival materials centering on Philadelphia's jazz community and (if funding is available) a free concert to be held at AAMP. Undergraduates are welcome to register for the course with permission of the instructor.
                                                            ARTH 525-401 TOPICS: GREEK/ROMAN ART: VIOLENCE AND ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN ART KUTTNER, ANN W 0200PM-0500PM Topics Varies. Fall 2018: "Roman Provincial Art" is a very active scholarly category: we test how it might be productive, sampling visual culture outside the empire's Italian heartland from the Late Republic into Late Antiquity. Rome's arts were always in dialogue with those of neighboring cultures; imperialist expansion into the Mediterranean world and beyond meant that cultural relations across many boundaries--social, ethic, territorial--potentially became cultural politics. Of related interest are relationships between visual and material culture within the Roman world's formal boundaries, in proto-global and imperial contexts, and those of peoples along and beyond those frontiers. (In Late Antiquity some of them took up rule within the old imperial boundaries, and came to cultural terms with their new lands.) "Style" is a fraught issue: what does attributed crudeness in regional practice add up to, and what were the aims of apparently trans-Mediterranean forms of display? Do "arts" engage identity formation, enforced or discrepant viewing? To analyze relations between the empire's local and "international" visual cultures's is to critique models of Romanization, center-periphery and network interaction, cultural fusion, translation and hybridity, creole and subaltern studies. It is also a glimpse, often, into the economies and production of art and artifacts as consumable goods, and the social and cultural phenomenon of taste.
                                                              ARTH 532-401 TOPICS IN BYZANTINE ART: THE CHORA MONASTERY AND THE WORLD OF LATE BYZANTIUM DRPIC, IVAN
                                                              OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT
                                                              R 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies.
                                                                ARTH 571-401 MODERN ARCH THEORY: URBANISM BROWNLEE, DAVID
                                                                LIN, ZHONGJIE
                                                                W 0200PM-0500PM A survey of architectural theory from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The discussion of original writings will be emphasized.
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  ARTH 626-401 HELL & ROM ART/ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN TR 1200PM-0130PM This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.
                                                                    ARTH 628-401 GREEK ARCH & URBANISM ZARMAKOUPI, MANTHA TR 1030AM-1200PM Introduction to the art of building and city planning in the ancient Greek world, 7th-1st c. BC. Emphasis on concepts of organizing space, on issues of structure, materials, decoration, proportion, and the Mycenean and eastern heritage as well as on theory and practice of urbanism as reflected in ancient cities (Athens, Pergamon, Alexandria) and writings (Plato, Artistotle, and others). Excursions to the Penn Museum and Philadelphia. No prerequisites.
                                                                      ARTH 635-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD BOOMER, MEGAN MW 0500PM-0630PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                                                                        ARTH 640-401 MEDIEVAL ART BOOMER, MEGAN MWF 0100PM-0200PM An introductory survey, this course investigates painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students become familiar with selected major monuments of the Late Antique, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as primary textual sources. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the aesthetic status of art and the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.
                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                          ARTH 681-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT BROWNLEE, DAVID MWF 1100AM-1200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                            ARTH 694-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                                                                              ARTH 775-301 TOP IN 19TH C. EUR ART: CEZANNE, ALIENATION, AND MODERN PORTRAITURE DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE R 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For Spring 2020, this course will cover'Cezanne, Alienation, and Modern Portraiture.' In the process of advancing modern art, Cezanne is often said to have subjugated the modern individual to the painting. Lost in conspicuous brushwork and vibrant coloration, the sitter had a difficult time making their presence felt in his work (not least his wife, Hortense Fiquet, who he portrayed most frequently). With the help of new scholarship on the artist and the period, this course will reassess this old saw of modernist art history, and instead place Cezanne's innovations carefully within the contemporary emergence of psychology and modern urban consciousness. We will discuss the various ways in which the birth of modernist representation coincided with the birth of the modern subject, and develop new means to analyze modernist portraiture more broadly. Along the way, this seminar will look carefully at Cezanne's entire career and oeuvre (and that of several of his colleagues as well), and we will study in particular the ways in which writers, philosophers and art historians--from Zola, Rilke, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty to Jonathan Crary, Tamar Garb and T. J. Clark more recently--have used the artist to write their histories of modernism and modernity since the turn of the last century.
                                                                                ARTH 791-401 AFRICAN FILM AND MEDIA PEDAGOGY REDROBE, KAREN
                                                                                WOUBSHET, DAGMAWI
                                                                                R 1200PM-0300PM This graduate seminar offers an intensive, critical, and collaborative study of contemporary African film and media production. The past three decades have seen an unprecedented shift in the African media landscape. Not only has the wide availability of satellite media across the continent made international film and television programing part of African popular culture, but moreover the growing film industries within the continent, most notably Nollywood, have altered how Africans are carving an image of themselves on the big and small screens. In partnership with local, regional, and international film and media centers, we will study a range of films--features, shorts, documentaries, and television shows--paying close attention to the means and sites of production as well as the formal qualities that distinguish these works. Many of the films we will analyze stand out both for their exceptional aesthetic quality as well as their remarkable ability to confront pressing political and social themes. But we will also think about trash: what counts as trashy media, and for whom? Who watches it, where, and why? Other questions we will ask include: What particular indigenous modes of storytelling do African films employ? What categories begin to emerge under the umbrella category of "African film and media," and where do diasporan film and media practitioners and critics fit in this landscape? How are these films tackling some of the urgent questions of our times, including migration and globalization; ethnic, political, and economic polarization; gender and sexuality; and massive urbanization and industrialization sweeping Africa and other parts of the Global South? What role do festivals in various countries play in shaping media production and distribution? How important is the concept of authorship in this context? And how do these films challenge the dominant western trope of Africa as a spectacle, instead offering novel ways of picturing everyday African experiences that we rarely glimpse in western media? To explore these questions, we will visit multiple sites of film production, distribution, exhibition, and education, including Scribe Video Center in Philadelphia, Sankofa Films in Washington, D.C., and the College of Performing and Visual Art at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Location and knowledge production are inextricably connected, and by considering African media production from these multiple sites, and collaborating with multiple stakeholders, this course offers a directly engaged pedagogy of the complex artistic, cultural, social, and political dynamics of African audiovisual creation. The travel component of this course entails a day trip to Washington, D.C. during the semester (tentative date: April 2, 2020) and a week-long trip to Addis Ababa at the end of the spring term (students applying for this course should be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa May 30, 2020-June 7, 2020). All expenses for travel, accommodation, and food will be covered, but students will need to hold a passport. Ultimately, this course aims to use film and media production to intervene in a larger discourse on how Africa is figured in the global humanities, not as an absent or passive actor but one actively engaged in producing art and humanistic knowledge that has much to teach us and the world. Admission to the course will be by permission only and students are required to submit a short statement of interest (max. 250 words) to dagw@english.upenn.edu and redkaren@sas.upenn.edu. Students must be prepared to travel to Addis Ababa and Washington D.C. as described in the syllabus, and must hold a passport.
                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR