Courses for Fall 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
FREN 110-301 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I MTWRF 0900AM-1000AM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
    FREN 110-302 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I MWF 1000AM-1100AM
    TR 0930AM-1030AM
    French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
      FREN 110-303 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
        FREN 110-304 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
          FREN 110-305 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY
            FREN 110-601 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I MW 0600PM-0830PM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY
              FREN 112-301 ELEM FRENCH: ACCELERATED MWF 0900AM-1000AM
              TR 0900AM-1030AM
              French 112 is an intensive elementary language course for students who have not studied French, but who have met the language requirement in another foreign language. This course will provide an introduction of the basic structures of French, with intensive work on speaking adn listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half will progress rapidly with the more difficult material presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will have frequent opportunities to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work that simulate real-life situations, so please prepare each day's lesson attentively. See "Preparation for each class" below for additional details. The cousre will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and conversations between native speakers. Homework will consist of aural comprehension exercises in the online SAM as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world by completing an engaging, interactive project in the final stage of the semester. By the end of this course, you should be able to meet a variety of day-to-day needs in a French-speaking setting and to handle a range of basic travel transactions. You will be able to engage in simple conversations on familiar topics such as family, lodging, daily routines, leisure activities, etc. You will begin to be able to speak and write in the past, present and the future, make comparisons, and describe people and things in increasing detail. You will develop reading skills that should allow you to get the gist of simple articles and you will more readily discern information when you hear native speakers talking in a simple fashion about topics familiar to you.
                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                FREN 120-301 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II TR 0300PM-0530PM French 120 is the second semester continuation of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                  FREN 121-301 ELEMENTARY FRENCH MTWRF 0900AM-1000AM French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French, with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations, so please prepare each day's lesson attentively. See "Preparation for each class" below for additional details. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will consist of aural comprehension exercises in the online SAM as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world by completing an engaging, interactive project in teh final stage of the semester. By the end of this course, you should be able to meet a variety of day-to-day needs in a French-speaking setting and to handle a range of basic travel transactions. You will be able to engage in simple conversations on familiar topics such as family, lodging, daily routines, leisure activities, etc. You will begin to be able to speak and write in the past, present, and the future, make comparisons, and describe people and things in increasing detail. You will develop reading skills that should allow you to get the gist of simple articles and you will more readily discern information when you hear native speakers talking in a simple fashion about topics familiar to you.
                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                    FREN 121-302 ELEMENTARY FRENCH MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                    TR 1030AM-1130AM
                    French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French, with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations, so please prepare each day's lesson attentively. See "Preparation for each class" below for additional details. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will consist of aural comprehension exercises in the online SAM as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world by completing an engaging, interactive project in teh final stage of the semester. By the end of this course, you should be able to meet a variety of day-to-day needs in a French-speaking setting and to handle a range of basic travel transactions. You will be able to engage in simple conversations on familiar topics such as family, lodging, daily routines, leisure activities, etc. You will begin to be able to speak and write in the past, present, and the future, make comparisons, and describe people and things in increasing detail. You will develop reading skills that should allow you to get the gist of simple articles and you will more readily discern information when you hear native speakers talking in a simple fashion about topics familiar to you.
                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                      FREN 121-303 ELEMENTARY FRENCH MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French, with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations, so please prepare each day's lesson attentively. See "Preparation for each class" below for additional details. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will consist of aural comprehension exercises in the online SAM as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world by completing an engaging, interactive project in teh final stage of the semester. By the end of this course, you should be able to meet a variety of day-to-day needs in a French-speaking setting and to handle a range of basic travel transactions. You will be able to engage in simple conversations on familiar topics such as family, lodging, daily routines, leisure activities, etc. You will begin to be able to speak and write in the past, present, and the future, make comparisons, and describe people and things in increasing detail. You will develop reading skills that should allow you to get the gist of simple articles and you will more readily discern information when you hear native speakers talking in a simple fashion about topics familiar to you.
                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                        FREN 121-304 ELEMENTARY FRENCH MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French, with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations, so please prepare each day's lesson attentively. See "Preparation for each class" below for additional details. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will consist of aural comprehension exercises in the online SAM as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world by completing an engaging, interactive project in teh final stage of the semester. By the end of this course, you should be able to meet a variety of day-to-day needs in a French-speaking setting and to handle a range of basic travel transactions. You will be able to engage in simple conversations on familiar topics such as family, lodging, daily routines, leisure activities, etc. You will begin to be able to speak and write in the past, present, and the future, make comparisons, and describe people and things in increasing detail. You will develop reading skills that should allow you to get the gist of simple articles and you will more readily discern information when you hear native speakers talking in a simple fashion about topics familiar to you.
                          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                          FREN 130-301 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MTWR 0900AM-1000AM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                            FREN 130-302 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MW 1000AM-1100AM
                            TR 1030AM-1130AM
                            French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                              FREN 130-303 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MW 1100AM-1200PM
                              TR 1100AM-1200PM
                              French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                FREN 130-304 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MTWR 1100AM-1200PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                  FREN 130-305 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MTWR 1200PM-0100PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                    FREN 130-306 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MTWR 0100PM-0200PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                      FREN 130-307 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MTWR 0300PM-0400PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                        FREN 130-601 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I TR 0600PM-0800PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY
                                          FREN 140-301 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II MTWR 0900AM-1000AM French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                            FREN 140-302 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II MW 1000AM-1100AM
                                            TR 1030AM-1130AM
                                            French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                              FREN 140-303 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II MW 1100AM-1200PM
                                              TR 1100AM-1200PM
                                              French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                FREN 140-304 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II MW 1200PM-0100PM
                                                TR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                  FREN 140-305 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II MTWR 1200PM-0100PM French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                    FREN 140-306 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II MW 0100PM-0200PM
                                                    TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                    French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                      FREN 140-307 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II MW 0200PM-0300PM
                                                      TR 0200PM-0300PM
                                                      French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                        FREN 140-308 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II TR 0300PM-0500PM French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                          FREN 180-301 ADV FR IN RESIDENCE Open only to residents in La Maison Francaise. Participants earn 1/2 c.u. per semester.
                                                            MODERN LANGUAGE COLLEGE HOUSE SEMINAR; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                            FREN 200-401 THE FANTASTIC VOYAGE FROM HOMER TO SCIENCE FICTION FRANCIS, SCOTT TR 0130PM-0300PM Please see the French website for the course description. http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/french/undergraduate/courses.html Tales of voyages to strange lands with strange inhabitants and even stranger customs have been a part of the Western literary tradition from its inception. What connects these tales is that their voyages are not only voyages of discovery, but voyages of self-discovery. By describing the effects these voyages have on the characters who undertake them, and by hinting at comparisons between the lands described in the story and their own society, authors use fantastic voyages as vehicles for incisive commentary on literary, social, political, and scientific issues. In this course, we will explore the tradition of the fantastic voyage from Homer’s Odyssey, one of the earliest examples of this type of narrative and a model for countless subsequent voyage narratives, to science fiction, which appropriates this narrative for its own ends. We will determine what the common stylistic elements of voyage narratives are, such as the frame narrative, or story-within-a-story, and what purpose they serve in conveying the tale’s messages. We will see how voyagers attempt to understand and interact with the lands and peoples they encounter, and what these attempts tell us about both the voyagers and their newly-discovered counterparts. Finally, we will ask ourselves what real-world issues are commented upon by these narratives, what lessons the narratives have to teach about them, and how they impart these lessons to the reader. Readings for this course, all of which are in English or English translation, range from classics like the Odyssey and Gulliver’s Travels to predecessors of modern science fiction like Jules Verne and H. G. Wells to seminal works of modern science fiction like Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, Karel Čapek’s War with the Newts, and Stanislaw Lem’s Solaris. Though this course is primarily dedicated to literature, we will also look at how films like the 1968 adaptation of Planet of the Apes and television shows like Star Trek and Futurama draw upon literary or cinematic models for their own purposes. This course is meant not only for SF fans who would like to become better acquainted with the precursors and classics of the genre, but for all those who wish to learn how great works of fiction, far from being intended solely for entertainment and escapism, attempt to improve upon the real world through the effect they have on the reader.
                                                              FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                                              FREN 202-301 ADVANCED FRENCH MW 1000AM-1100AM
                                                              TR 1030AM-1130AM
                                                              French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                FREN 202-302 ADVANCED FRENCH MW 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                TR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                  FREN 202-303 ADVANCED FRENCH MTWR 1200PM-0100PM French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                    FREN 202-304 ADVANCED FRENCH MW 0100PM-0200PM
                                                                    TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                                    French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                      FREN 202-305 ADVANCED FRENCH MTWR 0200PM-0300PM French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                        FREN 211-301 FRENCH FOR BUSINESS I MW 0330PM-0500PM This content-based language course, taught in French, introduces economic, business and professional terminology through the study of the following topics: financial institutions (banking, stock market and insurance); business practices (business letters and resumes); trade and advertising; the internal structure and legal forms of French companies. The course also emphasizes verbal communication through three components: 1) In-class activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions and debates. 2) The study of authentic materials such as newspapers and magazines' articles, video clips, and radio shows. 3) A series of students' presentations. Finally, in order to use and practice the new economic and business terminology studied in this course, and to also further explore the structure, the management, and the operations of the French companies, students will work in pairs on a research project about a major French company of their choice. One of the other goals of this course is to also prepare the students to take one of the exams offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry: the Diplome de Francais Professionnel, Affaires, C1. This exam will be held on campus in April.
                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                          FREN 212-301 ADV FR GRAM & COMP MWF 1000AM-1100AM Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 202 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French.
                                                                            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                            FREN 212-302 ADV FR GRAM & COMP MWF 1100AM-1200PM Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 202 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French.
                                                                              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                              FREN 212-303 ADV FR GRAM & COMP MWF 1200PM-0100PM Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 202 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French.
                                                                                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                FREN 214-301 ADV. COMP & CONVERSATION: Contemporary French Society Through Its Media PHILIPPON-DANIEL, CHANTAL MWF 1100AM-1200PM Entitled "Contemporary French Society through its Media," this course is intended to improve communicative skills through extensive practice in a variety of styles and forms. It aims to enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture, thought and modes of expression by promoting both cross-cultural understanding and critical thinking and developing students' communicative abilities (in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes). The specific language functions we will focus on are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. It is organized around the themes of current events, identity and art. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, Internet sources). The oral work include video blogs and group presentations on selected topics and current events. Written practice will comprise reflective journals, essays and collaborative work on Web projects. On completing this course, students will feel more confident and be able to speak and write effectively on a range of contemporary issues. Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France. Subtitled "Contemporary French Society through its Media," this course is thematically organized around individual/national identity, art and current events. It aims to: 1) enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture and thought; 2) cultivate authentic expression in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes in French; 3) promote cross-cultural understanding; 4) develop critical thinking. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, internet sources). Oral tasks comprise video blogs and group presentations on selected topics linked to current events. Written work focuses on reflective journals, genre-based writing and on Web-based collaborative research projects. The specific language functions we will target are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. On completing this course, students will communicate with more confidence, speaking and writing effectively on a range of contemporary issues. (Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France).
                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                  FREN 214-302 ADV. COMP & CONVERSATION PHILIPPON-DANIEL, CHANTAL MWF 0100PM-0200PM Entitled "Contemporary French Society through its Media," this course is intended to improve communicative skills through extensive practice in a variety of styles and forms. It aims to enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture, thought and modes of expression by promoting both cross-cultural understanding and critical thinking and developing students' communicative abilities (in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes). The specific language functions we will focus on are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. It is organized around the themes of current events, identity and art. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, Internet sources). The oral work include video blogs and group presentations on selected topics and current events. Written practice will comprise reflective journals, essays and collaborative work on Web projects. On completing this course, students will feel more confident and be able to speak and write effectively on a range of contemporary issues. Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France. Subtitled "Contemporary French Society through its Media," this course is thematically organized around individual/national identity, art and current events. It aims to: 1) enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture and thought; 2) cultivate authentic expression in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes in French; 3) promote cross-cultural understanding; 4) develop critical thinking. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, internet sources). Oral tasks comprise video blogs and group presentations on selected topics linked to current events. Written work focuses on reflective journals, genre-based writing and on Web-based collaborative research projects. The specific language functions we will target are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. On completing this course, students will communicate with more confidence, speaking and writing effectively on a range of contemporary issues. (Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France).
                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                    FREN 217-301 FRENCH PHONETICS EDELSTEIN, CHRISTINE TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in French phonetics and phonology. Part of the course will be devoted to learning how to produce discourse with native-like pronunciation and intonation. The course will also focus on improving aural comprehension by examining stylistic and regional differences in spoken French.
                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                      FREN 225-301 HISTORY, MEMORY, CULTURE PERON, MELANIE TR 0130PM-0300PM This course explores the history of the dark years of the French collaboration with Nazi Germany during WWII. In the first part, it examines the rise of the myths of an "eternal France" and the "true French" promoted by Marechal Petain's National Revolution, as well as the myth of the resistance fighters that arose after the Liberation. The Holocaust adn the holes left in national memory will hold a pivotal place in our reading of the national narrative. The second part of the course is dedicated to the study of literary works written by post-memory writers or survivors of the Holocaust who tried to fill in the blanks and confronted the linguistic challenge posed by Auschwitz. Paris will play a connecting role, as both witness to history and as tangible trace of the forgotten. This study of French history, its silences and (non-) memory will shed light on the legacy of the Occupation for contemporary France. Assessment consists of a semester-long creative writing project and a final oral exam. Reading assignments include works by Pierre Assouline, Marcel Cohen, Georges Didi-Huberman, David Foenkinos, Sarah Kofman, Marceline Loridan-Ivens, Patrick Modiano, Georges Perec.
                                                                                        FREN 226-301 FREN HIST/CLTR TIL 1789 PERON, MELANIE TR 0900AM-1030AM This civilization course presents the fabric/fabrication of the so-called national memory through its places of memory (lieux de memoire), as well as its places of non-memory (lieux de non-memoire), going from the Gauls to the Enlightenment. As the course tells the story of the rise and fall of the French monarchy, one is encouraged to envision it as a palimpsest and to become aware of the roles played by myths and legends. It helps see how French history has been manipulated by the collective memory, how retrospection often redefines, fabricates events and people depending on the needs of the moment. This course is taught in French.
                                                                                          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                          FREN 226-302 FREN HIST/CLTR TIL 1789 PERON, MELANIE TR 1030AM-1200PM This civilization course presents the fabric/fabrication of the so-called national memory through its places of memory (lieux de memoire), as well as its places of non-memory (lieux de non-memoire), going from the Gauls to the Enlightenment. As the course tells the story of the rise and fall of the French monarchy, one is encouraged to envision it as a palimpsest and to become aware of the roles played by myths and legends. It helps see how French history has been manipulated by the collective memory, how retrospection often redefines, fabricates events and people depending on the needs of the moment. This course is taught in French.
                                                                                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                            FREN 228-301 CONTEMPORARY FRANCE MARTIN, SAMUEL MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course we will be exploring the transformations of French society since the Second World War and into the Millennium. From the legacy of decolonization to the multicultural fervor of the 1998 Soccer World Cup, from the May 1968 civil protests to the Republican marches of 2015, we'll be delving into the major historical and cultural movements that have marked the contemporary period. How did France recover from German occupation and cope with further wars in its colonial territories? How did unprecedented rates of urbanization and immigration change the face of the country over the ensuing decades? Who have been the major players on the historical stage? And what are the political, cultural, and socioeconomic challenges facing France at the outset of the 21st century? These are some of the questions that will guide our investigation into the past 70 years of French history, a period as turbulent as it is rich in cultural production, and as complex as it is fascinating. Throughout the semester we will be especially attentive to images, in every sense of the word: the images of national identity that France projects to the world and to itself, but also pictorial representations of the country, its people and its territory. These images, and the stories they tell, will help us envision the kaleidoscopic portrait of a nation. The course will be conducted entirely in French.
                                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                              FREN 230-401 MASTERPIECES OF FRENCH CINEMA MET, PHILIPPE M 0200PM-0330PM This course will introduce students to key films of the French film canon, selected over a period ranging from the origins of French cinema to the present. Students will also be introduced to the key critical concepts (such as the notion of the "auteur" film genre) informing the discussion of films in France. The films will be studied in both a historical and theoretical context, related to their period styles (e.g. "le realisme poetique," "la Nouvelle Vague," etc.), their "auteurs," the nature of the French star system, the role of the other arts, as well to the critical debates they have sparked among critics and historians. Students will acquire the analytical tools in French to discuss films as artistic and as cultural texts. Please note: This course follows a Lecture/Recitation format. The Lecture (FREN 230-401/CIMS 245-401) is taught in English. For French credit: please register for both FREN 230-401 (lecture) and FREN 230-402 (recitation); the FREN 230-402 recitation is conducted in French. For Cinema Studies credit: please register for CIMS 245-401 (lecture) and CIMS 245-403 (recitation); both are taught in English. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the history and scope of French cinema all the way to the present time through the analysis of key works of the French film canon. Particular attention will be paid to successive period styles (“le réalisme poétique”, “la qualité française”, “la nouvelle vague”, “le film de banlieue”, etc.) as well as various genres (war, drama, comedy, crime, etc.) and the notion of auteurism. A variety of critical lenses will be used (psychoanalysis, socio-historical and cultural context, politics, esthetics, gender…) to better understand the specificities and complexities of these films. This course will help you enhance your analytical skills through the in-depth study of key scenes. You will learn to identify the formal techniques specific to the film medium and inscribe their relevance within both a historical and theoretical context. The lecture is conducted in English; students seeking French credit should register for the FREN 230-401 lecture and FREN 230-402 recitation; the latter is conducted in French. The CINE lecture (CINE 245-401) and recitation (CINE 245-403) are taught in English.
                                                                                                SECTION CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                FREN 231-401 FREN LIT: LOVE & PASSION FRANCIS, SCOTT TR 1030AM-1200PM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 231 has as its theme the presentation of love and passion in French literature. This course was previously offered as French 221.
                                                                                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; LITERATURES OF THE WORLD; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; WORLD LITERATURE
                                                                                                  FREN 231-402 FREN LIT: LOVE & PASSION TR 1200PM-0130PM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 231 has as its theme the presentation of love and passion in French literature. This course was previously offered as French 221.
                                                                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; LITERATURES OF THE WORLD; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; WORLD LITERATURE
                                                                                                    FREN 231-403 FREN LIT: LOVE & PASSION MW 0200PM-0330PM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 231 has as its theme the presentation of love and passion in French literature. This course was previously offered as French 221.
                                                                                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; LITERATURES OF THE WORLD; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; WORLD LITERATURE
                                                                                                      FREN 258-401 MODERNISMS & MODERNITIES: ALL OF BECKETT RABATE, JEAN-MICHEL TR 1200PM-0130PM Samuel Beckett has emerged as one of the most important authors of the 20th century. He has been called the last modernist, but moves beyond schools and genres with a diverse and abundant work in several media. We will survey Beckett’s main works, beginning with his essays on Joyce and Proustm the earlier novels and the essays on art criticism, We will move on to the Trilogy. We will then focus on the main plays and the later prose pieces. Finally, we will analyze the later work for film (Film, to which we will pay special attention), radio and television. We will try to understand why Beckett’s work has attracted so many philosophical readers, from Cavell to Badiou, including Adorno, Deleuze, Badiou, Nussbaum, and Critchley. The aim of the class will be to cover the four volumes of Beckett’s Selected Works (Grove Press, 2010), also to watch and discuss filmed versions of the main plays and televisual works. Requirements: two papers (8 pages each), three film journals (3 pages each) and one oral presentation (20 minutes). This class will be conducted in English.
                                                                                                        FREN 301-401 WOMEN, FILM & SOCIETY SINCE 1944 RICHMAN, MICHELE TR 1200PM-0130PM Topics vary. Please see the department's website for a description of the current offerings: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc This course provides an overview of the condition of women in France since 1944. Documents, philosophical tracts, and fictional works complement the main corpus of films. They first question how the dramatic social, economic and political mutations of the “Thirty Glorious” postwar years impacted women’s lives. Marguerite Duras, Simone de Beauvoir, Françoise Sagan, Dominique Aury, and Jean-Luc Godard provided controversial--- sometimes scandalous--- responses. Collectively, they challenged longstanding myths regarding love and sexuality, work and family, thereby preparing an appreciation of the contemporary films by Agnès Varda, Abdellatif Kechiche and François Ozon. The latter offer nuanced explorations of the inner lives of women in the post-women’s lib period, when the battles over legalized contraception, abortion and same-sex marriage have been won. Our survey is completed by the most recent film, “Bande de filles,” which shatters taboos on representation of race. Ultimately, we consider how the respective critiques of entrenched assumptions about women garnered over the semester resonate in the present #me too moment. CONDUCTED ENTIRELY IN FRENCH. Required: Two 200-level courses or more.
                                                                                                          FREN 322-301 France and the European Union PHILIPPON-DANIEL, CHANTAL MW 0330PM-0500PM This course aims to provide an understanding of the European Union as a complex entity: its history, institutions, challenges and future. After reviewing the history of European integration and learning about the Community's institutions, common programs and market, we will consider a wide variety of themes important to Europe: economics, education, immigration, the environment, social issues, national and European identities, the debate over a Federal Europe vs. a Europe of nations, European social/cultural models vs. American liberalism, relations between the EU and the rest of the world. Considering the acute and ongoing challenges facing the European community, we will focus on current events and discuss issues that are critical to the EU in general and to France in particular. Students will be responsible for pursuing substantive research on these and other topics and participating actively in debates. This class will be conducted entirely in French and is designed to improve cross-cultural understanding and communicative skills in the presentational, interpretive and interpersonal modes.
                                                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                            FREN 341-401 BOYS WILL BE BOYS: MASCULINITY IN FRENCH LITERATURE CANCELED Why was a portrait depicting the Renaissance king Francois I as half-man, half-woman made with royal approval, and moreover intended to represent the king as the perfect embodiment of the ideal qualities of a male sovereign? And why, in what is now regarded as the official portrat of Louis XIV, does the king prominently display his silk stockings and high heels with diamond-encrusted buckles? These are just two examples of the questions that lead us to the point of departure for this course: the idea that masculinity is not a fixed essence that has existed since time immemorial, but rather a flexible concept that changes across and even within historical periods. We will examine how masculinity has evolved from the Middle Ages and the chivalric ideal to the present day, how it has been defined, and its implications for gender relations, politics, and religion in different eras. In addition to literary works, we will study how masculinity is represented across a range of media, including visual arts, music, and film. Discussions will be in English, and assignments will be available in translation, but students who wish to receive credit in French will be able to do coursework in French.
                                                                                                              FREN 360-401 THE ENLIGHTENMENT DEJEAN, JOAN M 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary. For current course description, please see the department's webpage: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc Books have many powers. All too rarely, however, do they shape public opinion and change history. The greatest works of the French Enlightenment are perhaps the most striking exception ever to this rule. Our seminar will attempt to understand what the Enlightenment was and how it made its impact. We will read above all the works of the individuals who, more than anyone else, defined the age of Enlightenment: Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, and Rousseau. We will see, for example, how Voltaire used his works to teach Europeans to believe in such concepts as the fraternity of man and above all the necessity of religious tolerance. We will explore the construction of perhaps the most characteristic of all Enlightenment masterpieces, the Encyclopédie edited by Diderot and d'Alembert. And we will end by reading Benjamin Franklin's autobiography, to consider the ways in which the Enlightenment was present for major figures in this country's early history. We will pay particular attention to the risks each of these authors ran in making such controversial works public: they were constantly threatened by censorship from both church and state; Voltaire was exiled, Diderot imprisoned. The seminar will meet on the 6th floor of Van Pelt Library so that we can have access during our meetings to the original editions of many Enlightenment classics. We will thus be able to discuss both ways in which these works were shaped by the fear of censorship and techniques devised by their authors to elude censorship. We will also consider topics such as what the Enlightenment meant for women and the Enlightenment's global influence in the 18th century, particularly on the founding fathers of this country. The seminar will be taught in English. Students who wish to receive French credit will do the reading and the writing in French.
                                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                                FREN 384-301 FR NOVEL OF 20TH CENT PRINCE, GERALD TR 1030AM-1200PM Topics vary. Please check the department's website for the course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc A study of the twentieth-century French novel from modernism and existentialism to postmodernism and the "extrême contemporain" and from Proust and Gide, through Sartre and Camus, to Modiano and Houellebecq.
                                                                                                                  FREN 601-401 LANGUAGE TEACHING/LEARNG MCMAHON, KATHRYN W 0200PM-0400PM Please check the department's website for the course description. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc
                                                                                                                    FREN 630-401 DISCOURSE, IDENTITY, AUTHORITY AND GENDER IN MEDIEVAL FRENCH LITERATURE BROWNLEE, KEVIN R 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary. Previous topics include The Grail and the Rose, Literary Genres and Transformations, and Readings in Old French Texts. Please see the department's website for current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc
                                                                                                                      FREN 660-402 THE FRENCH (?) ENLIGHTENMENT DEJEAN, JOAN T 0200PM-0400PM Topics of discussion will vary from semester to semester. One possible topic is "Masterpieces of the Enlightenment." We will read the most influential texts of the Enlightenment, texts that shaped the social and political consciousness characteristic of the Enlightenment--for example, the meditations on freedom of religious expression that Voltaire contributed to "affaires" such as the "affaire Calas." We will also discuss different monuments of the spirit of the age--its corruption (Les Liaisons dangereuses), its libertine excesses and philosophy (La Philosophie dans le boudoir). We will define the specificity of 18th-century prose (fiction), guided by a central question: What was the Enlightenment? Please see department's website for current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc Much of the current debate about the phenomenon known as the Enlightenment is formulated in terms of national traditions: the Scottish Enlightenment, the German Enlightenment, and so forth. Behind these national markers lies an implicit questioning of France’s intellectual role in the 18th century. In fact, such a questioning was at the heart of the French Enlightenment from the start. This questioning began at the moment when the French language was Europe’s lingua franca and when France’s cultural and political superiority were widely recognized. But the Enlightenment’s classic texts reject the notion of cultural supremacy. The writers and philosophers who articulated its key arguments refused to define themselves as purely and simply French. Diderot, Montesquieu, and Voltaire encouraged their readers to think globally – of the earthquake in Lisbon, of the Jesuits in Peru, of the cost of slavery, and of Philadelphia as the ideal city. At the moment when the French language was dominant, thinkers such as Voltaire and Diderot became the first major figures to learn not classical languages but a modern one: English. They used their knowledge to introduce the Francophone world to everything from Shakespeare to the Bank of England. The so-called French Enlightenment marked in many ways the introduction of England to a broad non-Anglophone audience. We’ll examine the “foreignness” of the French Enlightenment in different fashions. In Lettres persanes (Persian Letters) and Lettres d’une Péruvienne (Peruvian Letters), Montesquieu and Graffigny viewed France’s institutions through a foreign lens. In Diderot and d’Alembert’s monumental Encyclopédie (The Encyclopedia), “France” is recalibrated in relation to “Geneva” and “Pennsylvania.” Voltaire’s Lettres philosophiques (Letters Concerning the English Nation) has been described as “the bomb” whose explosion signaled the start of the Enlightenment. The book’s two very different titles refer to two distinct works, one censored by French authorities and known only in truncated form -- the other a classic in England in the 18th century, widely known and revered. Which one should be considered explosive, the English work or the French one? The course will be taught in English. Reading can be done in French or in English, or in some combination of the two. The Encyclopedia, its history and its censorship, will be at the center of the course. The Encyclopedia’s extraordinary diversity will allow students to work on an equally diverse range of projects.
                                                                                                                        FREN 680-401 THE MODERN FRENCH NOVEL PRINCE, GERALD F 0200PM-0400PM Topics will vary. Please see the French department's website for current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc A narratologically oriented study of the poetics of the modern French novel from the Nouveau Roman (e.g. Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute, Simon) through Tournier, Le Clézio, Modiano, and Ernaux to the Nouvelle Ecole de Minuit and beyond (e.g. Toussaint, Houellebecq, and Michon).
                                                                                                                          FREN 690-301 PSTCOLNL STD & N AFR LIT: FRICTIONS: POSTCOLONIAL STUDIES & NORTH AFRICAN LITERATURE IN DIALOGUE M 0200PM-0400PM Topics will vary. Please see department's website for current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc This seminar examines an array of North African Francophone novels in order to explore and question the ongoing relevance of the concept of Postcolonialism for Maghrebi writers and intellectuals. By paying particular attention to the material conditions of production and consumption, and combining this perspective with one derived from postcolonial theory, we probe francophone literature's ability to reflect, bolster, and interrogate the postcolonial nation. We adopt both a comparative and thematic approach to discuss works published in the ex-colonial margins alongside those published concurrently in Paris, exploring topics to include: (1) Looking atthe continuing use of French in Maghrebi works, we discuss evolving notions of diglossia, Francophonie and world literature, and the uncertain role that this language has come to play in voicing socio-cultural dissatisfaction. (2) We interrogate how the changing realities of transnational migration challenge the postcolonial nation-state, (3) and the extent to which oppositional discourses run the risk of being commodified and participate in what has been termed the ‘postcolonial exotic.’ Readings will be drawn from across the Maghreb, with particular attention paid to new voices that were catalyzed by periods of political unrest, including the Algerian war of Liberation, its decade-long civil war, the “Lead years” in Morocco and the 2011 Tunisian revolution. This course will be taught in French.