Courses for Fall 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
FREN 110-301 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I BONNARDEL-KALIM, ANNE-LAURE WILLIAMS HALL 305 MTWRF 0900AM-1000AM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
    FREN 110-302 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I EDELSTEIN, CHRISTINE WILLIAMS HALL 6
    WILLIAMS HALL 6
    MWF 1000AM-1100AM
    TR 0930AM-1030AM
    French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
      FREN 110-303 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I BONNARDEL-KALIM, ANNE-LAURE WILLIAMS HALL 203 MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
        FREN 110-304 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I EDELSTEIN, CHRISTINE WILLIAMS HALL 6 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
          FREN 110-305 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I CANCELED French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY
            FREN 110-601 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I GAHIA, SAID WILLIAMS HALL 5 MW 0600PM-0830PM French 110 is the first semester of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop funcional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; ONLY OPEN TO LPS STUDENTS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
              FREN 112-301 ELEM FRENCH: ACCELERATED SAOULI, REBAIA WILLIAMS HALL 317
              WILLIAMS HALL 317
              MWF 0900AM-1000AM
              TR 0900AM-1030AM
              French 112 is an intensive elementary language course covering the equivalent of French 110 and 120 in one semester. Students must have a departmental permit to register. The course is normally open only to students who have no previous knowledge of French, and who have already fulfilled the language requirement in another language.
                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                FREN 120-301 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II BORNSCHEIN, ANNE WILLIAMS HALL 204 TR 0300PM-0530PM French 120 is the second semester continuation of the elementary-level sequence designed to develop functional proficiency in the four skills and gain familiarity with French and Francophone culture. The primary emphasis is on the development of the oral-aural skills, speaking and listening. Readings on topics in French culture as well as frequent writing practice are also included in the course. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class which will expose you to rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small group and pair work which simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require practice with the online component of the textbook (MyFrenchLab) as well as regular writing practice. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                  FREN 121-301 ELEMENTARY FRENCH DOUGHERTY, JACQUELINE WILLIAMS HALL 204 MTWRF 0900AM-1000AM French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. Students with an SATII score between 380-440 or a placement exam score between 281-368 should enroll in French 121. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require frequent practice with audio and video material, and will include daily written assignments. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                    FREN 121-302 ELEMENTARY FRENCH KRAMER, MONICA WILLIAMS HALL 305 MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. Students with an SATII score between 380-440 or a placement exam score between 281-368 should enroll in French 121. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require frequent practice with audio and video material, and will include daily written assignments. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                      FREN 121-303 ELEMENTARY FRENCH RAJAPAKSHAYAPA, MAHESHA WILLIAMS HALL 202 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. Students with an SATII score between 380-440 or a placement exam score between 281-368 should enroll in French 121. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require frequent practice with audio and video material, and will include daily written assignments. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                        FREN 121-304 ELEMENTARY FRENCH CANCELED French 121 is an intensive one-semester language course for students who have had some French before but who can benefit from a complete review of elementary French. Students with an SATII score between 380-440 or a placement exam score between 281-368 should enroll in French 121. This course will provide a re-introduction of the basic structures of French with intensive work on speaking and listening designed to prepare students to take Intermediate French. Due to the nature of the course, the first half of the semester will progress rapidly, with much more difficult material being presented after the midterm period. As in other French courses, class will be conducted entirely in French. You will be guided through a variety of communicative activities in class that will expose you to a rich input of spoken French and lead you from structured practice to free expression. You will be given frequent opportunity to practice your newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures in small- group and pair work activities that simulate real-life situations. The course will introduce you to French and Francophone culture through authentic materials including written documents, simple articles, songs, films, videos, and taped conversations between native speakers. Out-of-class homework will require frequent practice with audio and video material, and will include daily written assignments. The course will also invite you to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.
                          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                          FREN 130-301 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I MILLER, JARED WILLIAMS HALL 319 MTWR 0900AM-1000AM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                            FREN 130-302 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I PETITJEAN, LUCIE WILLIAMS HALL 204
                            LERNER CENTER (MUSIC BUILDING 102
                            MW 1000AM-1100AM
                            TR 1030AM-1130AM
                            French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                              FREN 130-303 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I DOLTO, SOPHIE WILLIAMS HALL 319
                              WILLIAMS HALL 2
                              MW 1100AM-1200PM
                              TR 1100AM-1200PM
                              French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                FREN 130-304 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I CANCELED French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                  FREN 130-305 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I KRAMER, MONICA WILLIAMS HALL 24 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                    FREN 130-306 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I DEGAT, SOPHIE WILLIAMS HALL 306 MTWR 0100PM-0200PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                      FREN 130-307 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I KRAMER, MONICA WILLIAMS HALL 25 MTWR 0300PM-0400PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY
                                        FREN 130-601 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I BORNSCHEIN, ANNE WILLIAMS HALL 201 TR 0600PM-0800PM French 130 is the first half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. As in other French courses at Penn, class will be conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as role-plays, problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Through the study of authentic materials such as articles, poems, songs, films, videos, you will deepen your knowledge of the French-speaking world. Daily homework will require listening practice with audio and video material, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook and frequent composition practice. Students who have completed French 120, or with an SATII score of 450-540 or a placement score between 30 and 35 should enroll in this course.
                                          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                          FREN 140-301 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II DONALDSON, COLEMAN VAN PELT LIBRARY 113
                                          WILLIAMS HALL 321
                                          MW 0900AM-1000AM
                                          TR 0900AM-1000AM
                                          French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                            FREN 140-302 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II DONALDSON, COLEMAN WILLIAMS HALL 316
                                            WILLIAMS HALL 316
                                            MW 1000AM-1100AM
                                            TR 1030AM-1130AM
                                            French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                              FREN 140-303 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II BRITTON, LISA VAN PELT LIBRARY 113
                                              WILLIAMS HALL 319
                                              MW 1100AM-1200PM
                                              TR 1100AM-1200PM
                                              French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                FREN 140-304 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II BRITTON, LISA VAN PELT LIBRARY 113
                                                WILLIAMS HALL 316
                                                MW 1200PM-0100PM
                                                TR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                  FREN 140-305 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II SAOULI, REBAIA WILLIAMS HALL 306 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                    FREN 140-306 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II FRANCOIS, ANNE-MARIE VAN PELT LIBRARY 113
                                                    WILLIAMS HALL 303
                                                    MW 0100PM-0200PM
                                                    TR 0100PM-0200PM
                                                    French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                      FREN 140-307 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II TROUILLET, AGNES WILLIAMS HALL 307
                                                      VAN PELT LIBRARY 113
                                                      MW 0200PM-0300PM
                                                      TR 0200PM-0300PM
                                                      French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY
                                                        FREN 140-308 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II CANCELED French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                          FREN 140-601 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II GAHIA, SAID WILLIAMS HALL 705 TR 0600PM-0800PM French 140 is the second half of a two-semester intermediate sequence designed to help you attain a level of proficiency that should allow you to function comfortably in a French-speaking environment. You are expected to have already learned the most basic grammatical structures in elementary French and you will review these on your own in the course workbook. This course will build on your existing skills in French, increase your confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French, and introduce you to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural material. This course focuses on the culture of French-speaking countries beyond the borders of France. Along with your classmates, you will explore the cities of Dakar, Fort-de-France and Marrakesh, investigating the diversity of the Francophone world through film, literature and music. As in other French courses at Penn, class is conducted entirely in French. In addition to structured oral practice, work in class will include frequent communicative activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions, and debates, often carried out in pairs or small groups. Daily homework will require researching in the library and on the Internet, listening practice with video clips, in addition to regular written exercises in the workbook.
                                                            ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                            FREN 180-301 ADV FR IN RESIDENCE Open only to residents in La Maison Francaise. Participants earn 1/2 c.u. per semester.
                                                              MODERN LANGUAGE COLLEGE HOUSE SEMINAR; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                              FREN 200-401 THE FANTASTIC VOYAGE FROM HOMER TO SCIENCE FICTION FRANCIS, SCOTT WILLIAMS HALL 705 TR 0130PM-0300PM Please see the French website for the course description. http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/roml/french/undergraduate/courses.html Tales of voyages to strange lands with strange inhabitants and even stranger customs have been a part of the Western literary tradition from its inception. What connects these tales is that their voyages are not only voyages of discovery, but voyages of self-discovery. By describing the effects these voyages have on the characters who undertake them, and by hinting at comparisons between the lands described in the story and their own society, authors use fantastic voyages as vehicles for incisive commentary on literary, social, political, and scientific issues. In this course, we will explore the tradition of the fantastic voyage from Homer’s Odyssey, one of the earliest examples of this type of narrative and a model for countless subsequent voyage narratives, to science fiction, which appropriates this narrative for its own ends. We will determine what the common stylistic elements of voyage narratives are, such as the frame narrative, or story-within-a-story, and what purpose they serve in conveying the tale’s messages. We will see how voyagers attempt to understand and interact with the lands and peoples they encounter, and what these attempts tell us about both the voyagers and their newly-discovered counterparts. Finally, we will ask ourselves what real-world issues are commented upon by these narratives, what lessons the narratives have to teach about them, and how they impart these lessons to the reader. Readings for this course, all of which are in English or English translation, range from classics like the Odyssey and Gulliver’s Travels to predecessors of modern science fiction like Jules Verne and H. G. Wells to seminal works of modern science fiction like Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, Karel Čapek’s War with the Newts, and Stanislaw Lem’s Solaris. Though this course is primarily dedicated to literature, we will also look at how films like the 1968 adaptation of Planet of the Apes and television shows like Star Trek and Futurama draw upon literary or cinematic models for their own purposes. This course is meant not only for SF fans who would like to become better acquainted with the precursors and classics of the genre, but for all those who wish to learn how great works of fiction, far from being intended solely for entertainment and escapism, attempt to improve upon the real world through the effect they have on the reader.
                                                                FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                                                FREN 202-301 ADVANCED FRENCH MARTIN, SAMUEL WILLIAMS HALL 633
                                                                WILLIAMS HALL 633
                                                                MW 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                TR 1030AM-1130AM
                                                                French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region. French 202 is a one-semester third-year level French course. It is designed to prepare students for subsequent study in upper level courses in French and francophone literature, linguistics, civilization, cinema, etc. It is required for students who have completed 140 and recommended for those with an equivalent level, wishing to continue in more advanced French courses or preparing for study abroad. Exceptions can be made with permission of undergraduate chair. It is also the appropriate course for those students who have time for only one more French course and wish to solidify their knowledge of the language by continuing to work on all four skills - speaking, listening, reading and writing. Students’ work will be evaluated both in terms of progress in language skills and of ability to handle and engage in the content areas. This course does not include a systematic review of French grammar (that is done in French 212). Nevertheless, through the diverse writing assessments (e.g. creative writing; essays), the various textual and visual references (e.g. novels; articles; films; clips), the communicative approach, the students will play an active role in their learning process and consequently will be led to consolidate and deepen their grammatical competence.
                                                                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                  FREN 202-302 ADVANCED FRENCH BOISROUX, LAURE WILLIAMS HALL 204
                                                                  WILLIAMS HALL 843
                                                                  MW 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                  TR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                  French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                    ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                    FREN 202-303 ADVANCED FRENCH PETITJEAN, LUCIE WILLIAMS HALL 29 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                      ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                      FREN 202-304 ADVANCED FRENCH PETITJEAN, LUCIE WILLIAMS HALL 201
                                                                      WILLIAMS HALL 2
                                                                      MW 0100PM-0200PM
                                                                      TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                                      French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                        ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                        FREN 202-305 ADVANCED FRENCH CANCELED French 202 is a third-year level course aimed at better understanding contemporary French society, language and culture, with a special focus on today's young generation. What defines a generation in the first place, and how do the lives of young people in France compare to those of their American counterparts? To answer these questions, students in 202 will delve into numerous aspects of French youth experience from the school system to family life, and from the workplace to the political arena, with the aid of resources including contemporary films, news articles, songs, literary texts, and the recent sociological project "Generation Quoi." In addition, they will forge connections with the French community on Penn's campus, as they embark on a journey of cultural exploration and reflexive self-discovery. While 202 is not a grammar-focused course, particular attention will be given to recognizing and employing the different registers of spoken and written French. The course constitutes excellent preparation for study abroad in a French-speaking region.
                                                                          ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                          FREN 211-301 FR FOR PROFESSIONS I DEGAT, SOPHIE WILLIAMS HALL 220 MW 0330PM-0500PM This content-based language course, taught in French, introduces economic, business and professional terminology through the study of the following topics: financial institutions (banking, stock market and insurance); business practices (business letters and resumes); trade and advertising; the internal structure and legal forms of French companies. The course also emphasizes verbal communication through three components: 1) In-class activities such as problem-solving tasks, discussions and debates. 2) The study of authentic materials such as newspapers and magazines' articles, video clips, and radio shows. 3) A series of students' presentations. Finally, in order to use and practice the new economic and business terminology studied in this course, and to also further explore the structure, the management, and the operations of the French companies, students will work in pairs on a research project about a major French company of their choice. One of the other goals of this course is to also prepare the students to take one of the exams offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry: the Diplome de Francais Professionnel, Affaires, C1. This exam will be held on campus in April.
                                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                            FREN 212-301 ADV FR GRAM & COMP CANCELED Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 202 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French.
                                                                              ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                              FREN 212-302 ADV FR GRAM & COMP SAOULI, REBAIA WILLIAMS HALL 316 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 202 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French.
                                                                                ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                FREN 212-303 ADV FR GRAM & COMP DOUGHERTY, JACQUELINE WILLIAMS HALL 421 MWF 1200PM-0100PM Intensive review of grammar integrated into writing practice. A good knowledge of basic French grammar is a prerequisite (French 202 or equivalent is recommended). Conducted entirely in French, the course will study selected grammatical difficulties of the French verbal and nominal systems including colloquial usage. Frequent oral and written assignments with opportunity for rewrites. Articles from French newspapers and magazines, literary excerpts, and a novel or short stories will be used as supplementary materials in order to prepare students to take content courses in French in disciplines other than French.
                                                                                  ATTENDANCE AT FIRST CLASS MANDATORY; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                  FREN 214-301 ADV. COMP & CONVERSATION: Contemporary French Society Through Its Media PHILIPPON-DANIEL, CHANTAL WILLIAMS HALL 27 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Entitled "Contemporary French Society through its Media," this course is intended to improve communicative skills through extensive practice in a variety of styles and forms. It aims to enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture, thought and modes of expression by promoting both cross-cultural understanding and critical thinking and developing students' communicative abilities (in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes). The specific language functions we will focus on are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. It is organized around the themes of current events, identity and art. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, Internet sources). The oral work include video blogs and group presentations on selected topics and current events. Written practice will comprise reflective journals, essays and collaborative work on Web projects. On completing this course, students will feel more confident and be able to speak and write effectively on a range of contemporary issues. Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France. This course is intended to improve communicative skills through extensive practice in a variety of styles and forms. It aims to enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture, thought and modes of expression by promoting both cross-cultural understanding and critical thinking and developing students’ communicative abilities (in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes). The specific language functions we will focus on are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. It is organized around the themes of current events, identity and art. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, internet sources). The oral work will include video blogs and group presentations on selected topics and current events. Written practice will comprise reflective journals, essays and collaborative work on Web projects. On completing this course, student will feel more confident and be able to speak and write effectively on a range of contemporary issues. (Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France).
                                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                    FREN 214-302 ADV. COMP & CONVERSATION PHILIPPON-DANIEL, CHANTAL WILLIAMS HALL 27 MWF 0100PM-0200PM Entitled "Contemporary French Society through its Media," this course is intended to improve communicative skills through extensive practice in a variety of styles and forms. It aims to enhance student understanding of contemporary French culture, thought and modes of expression by promoting both cross-cultural understanding and critical thinking and developing students' communicative abilities (in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes). The specific language functions we will focus on are: narration; description; offering and soliciting advice and opinions; expressing feelings; critique and analysis; argumentation. It is organized around the themes of current events, identity and art. Activities include the study, analysis and emulation of model texts as well as discussion and debates about events and social issues as covered by the French news media (television, print, Internet sources). The oral work include video blogs and group presentations on selected topics and current events. Written practice will comprise reflective journals, essays and collaborative work on Web projects. On completing this course, students will feel more confident and be able to speak and write effectively on a range of contemporary issues. Recommended for students who are planning to study abroad in France.
                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                      FREN 217-301 FRENCH PHONETICS EDELSTEIN, CHRISTINE WILLIAMS HALL 438 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in French phonetics and phonology. Part of the course will be devoted to learning how to produce discourse with native-like pronunciation and intonation. The course will also focus on improving aural comprehension by examining stylistic and regional differences in spoken French.
                                                                                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                        FREN 225-301 HISTORY, MEMORY, CULTURE PERON, MELANIE WILLIAMS HALL 204 TR 0130PM-0300PM
                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                          FREN 226-301 FREN HIST/CLTR TIL 1789 PERON, MELANIE WILLIAMS HALL 843 TR 0900AM-1030AM An introduction to the social, political and historical institutions of France from the earliest times until the Revolution of 1789. Required for majors in French and also of particular interest to majors in history, international relations, Wharton students, etc. This course will be taught in French.
                                                                                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                            FREN 226-302 FREN HIST/CLTR TIL 1789 PERON, MELANIE WILLIAMS HALL 27 TR 1030AM-1200PM An introduction to the social, political and historical institutions of France from the earliest times until the Revolution of 1789. Required for majors in French and also of particular interest to majors in history, international relations, Wharton students, etc. This course will be taught in French.
                                                                                              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                              FREN 228-301 CONTEMPORARY FRANCE MARTIN, SAMUEL WILLIAMS HALL 304 MWF 1200PM-0100PM This course focuses on the major cultural and political events that have transformed French society from 1945 to the first decades of the new millennium. Using a wide range of print, visual, and online media, this class allows students to examine and research contemporary France by way of the main issues, movements and debates that have marked the last decades. Among these are: France's postwar International relations; Memory and national identity; Migration, immigration and multiculturalism; Religion and/in the Republic; Civil society; Intellectual movements and cultural productions. In this course we will be exploring the transformations of French society since the Second World War and into the Millennium. From the legacy of decolonization to the multicultural fervor of the 1998 Soccer World Cup, from the May 1968 civil protests to the Republican marches of 2015, we'll be delving into the major historical and cultural movements that have marked the contemporary period. How did France recover from German occupation and cope with further wars in its colonial territories? How did unprecedented rates of urbanization and immigration change the face of the country over the ensuing decades? Who have been the major players on the historical stage? And what are the political, cultural, and socioeconomic challenges facing France at the outset of the 21st century? These are some of the questions that will guide our investigation into the past 70 years of French history, a period as turbulent as it is rich in cultural production, and as complex as it is fascinating. Throughout the semester we will be especially attentive to images, in every sense of the word: the images of national identity that France projects to the world and to itself, but also pictorial representations of the country, its people and its territory. These images, and the stories they tell, will help us envision the kaleidoscopic portrait of a nation. The course will be conducted entirely in French.
                                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                FREN 230-401 MASTERPIECES OF FRENCH CINEMA MET, PHILIPPE WILLIAMS HALL 202 M 0200PM-0330PM This course will introduce students to key films of the French film canon, selected over a period ranging from the origins of French cinema to the present. Students will also be introduced to the key critical concepts (such as the notion of the "auteur" film genre) informing the discussion of films in France. The films will be studied in both a historical and theoretical context, related to their period styles (e.g. "le realisme poetique," "la Nouvelle Vague," etc.), their "auteurs," the nature of the French star system, the role of the other arts, as well to the critical debates they have sparked among critics and historians. Students will acquire the analytical tools in French to discuss films as artistic and as cultural texts. Please note: This course follows a Lecture/Recitation format. The Lecture (FREN 230-401/CIMS 245-401) is taught in English. For French credit: please register for both FREN 230-401 (lecture) and FREN 230-402 (recitation); the FREN 230-402 recitation is conducted in French. For Cinema Studies credit: please register for CIMS 245-401 (lecture) and CIMS 245-403 (recitation); both are taught in English.
                                                                                                  SECTION CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                  FREN 231-401 FREN LIT: LOVE & PASSION GOULET, ANDREA WILLIAMS HALL 219 TR 1030AM-1200PM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 231 has as its theme the presentation of love and passion in French literature. This course was previously offered as French 221.
                                                                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; LITERATURES OF THE WORLD; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; WORLD LITERATURE
                                                                                                    FREN 231-402 FREN LIT: LOVE & PASSION FRANCIS, SCOTT WILLIAMS HALL 705 TR 1200PM-0130PM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 231 has as its theme the presentation of love and passion in French literature. This course was previously offered as French 221.
                                                                                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; LITERATURES OF THE WORLD; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; WORLD LITERATURE
                                                                                                      FREN 231-403 FREN LIT: LOVE & PASSION PRINCE, GERALD WILLIAMS HALL 516 MW 0200PM-0330PM This basic course in literature provides an overview of French literature and acquaints students with major literary trends through the study of representative works from each period. Students are expected to take an active part in class discussion in French. French 231 has as its theme the presentation of love and passion in French literature. This course was previously offered as French 221.
                                                                                                        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; LITERATURES OF THE WORLD; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; WORLD LITERATURE
                                                                                                        FREN 322-301 France and the European Union PHILIPPON-DANIEL, CHANTAL WILLIAMS HALL 203 MW 0330PM-0500PM This course aims to provide an understanding of the European Union as a complex entity: its history, institutions, challenges and future. After reviewing the history of European integration and learning about the Community's institutions, common programs and market, we will consider a wide variety of themes important to Europe: economics, education, immigration, the environment, social issues, national and European identities, the debate over a Federal Europe vs. a Europe of nations, European social/cultural models vs. American liberalism, relations between the EU and the rest of the world. Considering the acute and ongoing challenges facing the European community, we will focus on current events and discuss issues that are critical to the EU in general and to France in particular. Students will be responsible for pursuing substantive research on these and other topics and participating actively in debates. This class will be conducted entirely in French and is designed to improve cross-cultural understanding and communicative skills in the presentational, interpretive and interpersonal modes. This course aims to provide an understanding of the European Union as a complex entity: its history, institutions, challenges and future. After reviewing the history of European integration and learning about the Community’s institutions, common programs and market, we will consider a wide variety of themes important to Europe: economics, education, immigration, the environment, social issues, national and European identities, the debate over a Federal Europe vs a Europe of nations, European social/cultural models vs American liberalism, relations between the EU and the rest of the world. Considering the acute and ongoing challenges facing the European community, we will focus on current events and discuss issues that are critical to the EU in general and to France in particular. Students will be responsible for pursuing substantive research on these and other topics and participating actively in debates. This class will be conducted entirely in French and is designed to improve cross-cultural understanding and communicative skills in the presentational, interpretive, and interpersonal modes.
                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                          FREN 341-401 BOYS WILL BE BOYS: MASCULINITY IN FRENCH LITERATURE FRANCIS, SCOTT CANCELED Why was a portrait depicting the Renaissance king Francois I as half-man, half-woman made with royal approval, and moreover intended to represent the king as the perfect embodiment of the ideal qualities of a male sovereign? And why, in what is now regarded as the official portrat of Louis XIV, does the king prominently display his silk stockings and high heels with diamond-encrusted buckles? These are just two examples of the questions that lead us to the point of departure for this course: the idea that masculinity is not a fixed essence that has existed since time immemorial, but rather a flexible concept that changes across and even within historical periods. We will examine how masculinity has evolved from the Middle Ages and the chivalric ideal to the present day, how it has been defined, and its implications for gender relations, politics, and religion in different eras. In addition to literary works, we will study how masculinity is represented across a range of media, including visual arts, music, and film. Discussions will be in English, and assignments will be available in translation, but students who wish to receive credit in French will be able to do coursework in French. Why was a portrait depicting the Renaissance king François Ier as half-man, half-woman made with royal approval, and moreover intended to represent the king as the perfect embodiment of the ideal qualities of a male sovereign? And why, in what is now regarded as the official portrait of Louis XIV, does the king prominently display his silk stockings and high heels with diamond-encrusted buckles? These are just two examples of the questions that lead us to the point of departure for this course: the idea that masculinity is not a fixed essence that has existed since time immemorial, but rather a flexible concept that changes across and even within historical periods. We will examine how masculinity has evolved from the Middle Ages and the chivalric ideal to the present day, how it has been defined, and its implications for gender relations, politics, and religion in different eras. In addition to literary works, we will study how masculinity is represented across a range of media, including visual arts, music, and film. Discussions will be in English, and assignments will be available in translation, but students who wish to receive credit in French will be able to do coursework in French.
                                                                                                            FREN 360-401 THE ENLIGHTENMENT DEJEAN, JOAN VAN PELT LIBRARY 605 W 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary. For current course description, please see French Department's webpage: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc
                                                                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                              FREN 371-301 POE'S FRENCH LEGACIES GOULET, ANDREA WILLIAMS HALL 3 TR 0130PM-0300PM Edgar Allan Poe was considered a vulgar hack by many of his fellow Americans, but in 19th-century France, he was touted as a misunderstood poetic genius, the original poete maudit. Through the translations of Charles Baudelaire, who found in Poe a kindred spirit in the "gout de l'infini," French intellectuals came to know the American writer as a fount of aesthetic wisdom, diabolical sensibility, and mystic mastery. In this course, we will study Baudelaire's poetry as well as the many literary and artistic movements in France that were directly inspired by Poe's uncanny mix of the macabre and the methodical: Symbolist poetry (Valery, Mallarme), the Scientific Fantastic (Maupassant, Villiers de l'Isle-Adam), fin-de-siecle Decadence (Huysmanns, Odilon Redon), Science Fiction (Verne), the detective novel (Gaboriau), and 20th-century Surrealism (Breton, Max Ernst). Edgar Allan Poe was considered a vulgar hack by many of his fellow Americans, but in 19th-century France, he was touted as a misunderstood poetic genius, the original poète maudit. Through the translations of Charles Baudelaire, who found in Poe a kindred spirit in the “goût de l’infini,” French intellectuals came to know the American writer as a fount of aesthetic wisdom, diabolical sensibility, and mystic mastery. In this course, we will study Baudelaire’s poetry as well as the many literary and artistic movements in France that were directly inspired by Poe’s uncanny mix of the macabre and the methodical: Symbolist poetry (Valéry, Mallarmé), the Scientific Fantastic (Maupassant, Villiers de l’Isle-Adam), fin-de-siècle Decadence (Huysmanns, Odilon Redon), Science Fiction (Verne), the detective novel (Gaboriau), and 20th-century Surrealism (Breton, Max Ernst).
                                                                                                                FREN 389-301 FRANCE AND ITS OTHERS: FRANCE AND THE NEW WORLD RICHMAN, MICHELE CANCELED A historical appreciation of the impact of the exploration, colonization, and immigration of other peoples on French national consciousness, from the 16th century to the present. Emphasis is on the role of the Other in fostering critiques of French culture and society. Readings include travel literature, anthropological treatises, novels, and historical documents. Oral presentations and several short papers are included in the course. A New York Times op-ed piece reminded Americans a few years ago that but for a twist of historical fate, we would all be speaking French. It is indeed frequently overlooked that the French were among the earliest explorers and settlers in the New World, possibly pre-dating the arrival of Columbus. More surprising are the great works generated by the shock of contact, when Amerindian peoples compelled the French to examine fundamental assumptions regarding the nature of their religion, social and sexual mores, and the State. The impressive results figure among the most challenging works of Western civilization, since they dare readers to an ethnographic detour into other cultures as the basis for a critical comparison with their own. Within the geo-political framework of the French presence from Brazil to Canada, our focus will be on exemplars of what Claude Lévi-Strauss has described as anthropological thinking, the tradition emanating from Montaigne in the 16th century and central to the revolutionary ideas of the Enlightenment. Our diverse readings include Jean de Léry’s early account of his sojourn among the Tupis of Brazil as well as a proto-feminist epistolary novel by Graffigny. We also draw on cinematic re-creations of the French experience of cannibalism (How Tasty was my Frenchman) and Jesuit adventures in Canada (Black Robe). Excerpts from Tocqueville’s classic study of democracy in America will be followed by a contemporary Frenchman’s repeat of his 1830 investigation into the American penal system, updated by a visit to the local Eastern State Penitentiary that was considered the premiere prison system of the New World at the time of its construction. Of interest to students in French studies, international relations, intellectual history, comparative studies, political thought. Conducted in French.
                                                                                                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                                  FREN 550-401 WOMEN WRITING IN THE LONG 17TH CENTURY DEJEAN, JOAN WILLIAMS HALL 516 F 0200PM-0400PM The specific topics of the seminar vary from semester to semester, depending on the instructor and his/her choice. Among the topics previously covered, and likely to be offered again, are the following: The Theatre of Jean Racine, Fiction of Mme de Lafayette, The Moralists (La Bruyere, La Rochefoucauld, Perrault ), Realistic Novels (Sorel's Francion, Scarron's Le Roman Comique, Furetiere's Le Roman Bourgeois). Students Give oral and written reports, and write a term paper. This course will be taught in English; writing can be done in French or in English. The course is open to advanced undergraduates with permission from the instructor. The 17th century was the formative period for modern French literature, the so-called grand siècle that gave the French tradition the greatest number of works still considered classics of French literature. The age from 1640-1715 was also the greatest moment ever for women’s participation in French intellectual life. Women writers, for instance, both invented and dominated the production of the most important genre to trace its origins to the 17th century, the modern novel. The first fairy tale was published by a woman; during the early decades of that genre’s existence, most of its important practitioners were women. Women published major works in every significant literary form of the age, from tragedy to memoirs. During no other century in the French tradition did women know anything like this kind of visibility. All over Europe, from Italy and Spain to German, publishers took note of the success story of French women’s writing and began to translate best-selling works in French with a speed never heard of before – often the same year as their original publication. And nowhere was this more true than in England, where even Scudéry’s immense novels quickly appeared in English. Lafayette’s Princesse de Clèves was available in English and was even adapted for the London stage within a year of its first French edition. As a result, these works by women writers became basic reading all over the European continent. Novels by Scudéry and Lafayette were actively promoted all through that formative period for modern prose fiction, the 18th century. We’ll read a variety of works fictional and non-fictional – from novels and fairy tales, from memoirs to the periodical press. And because translation into English was so widespread in the 17th century, students will be able to read all the works in English if they choose.
                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                    FREN 591-401 After Odysseus. On Hospitality in France, North Africa & the Mediterranean WILLIAMS HALL 217 R 0200PM-0400PM This course, taught by André Benhaim, will be conducted in French. Departing from the Homeric paradigm of hospitality as a fundamental critical framework, “After Odysseus” questions what it means, and what is at stake, when one welcomes (or not) a stranger. After the Revolution, France declared itself, formally and symbolically, a haven for refugees from all nations. In modern times, this kind of hospitality pertained to many forms of migrations and extended not only to foreign citizens but also to stateless people. Wars, colonization, and their aftermaths, economical upheavals, political vicissitudes, cultural transformations all contributed to challenge this ideal. Since the turn of the millennial, today, and at the gates of Europe, the dire fate of countless migrants perishing at sea trying to cross the Mediterranean to reach its northern shores echoes the crucial questions to and by hospitality, not only for the southern nations the most directly involved (Greece, Italy), but also for France, as the culture that has sustained the most significant mutually influential relations with North Africa. Thus, hospitality will be considered from an array of perspectives. Recalling different models in the Western, Mediterranean, and Arab traditions, we will examine the relationship between France, North Africa, and the Mediterranean at large, whilst challenging its common definitions (to reconsider the North-South dynamics, for instance). Using literature and philosophy, linguistics and the visual arts from canonical to popular culture, we will ponder the notions of cosmopolitanism and borders, address issues of colonization, immigration and citizenship, and also, language and its discontents with “literature” as the ultimate ethos for both exclusion and togetherness.
                                                                                                                      FREN 601-401 LANGUAGE TEACHING/LEARNG MCMAHON, KATHRYN WILLIAMS HALL 543 W 0200PM-0400PM Please check the French department's website for the course description. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc This course is required of all Teaching Assistants in French and Italian in the second semester of their first year of teaching. It is designed to provide instructors with the necessary practical support to carry out their teaching responsibilities effectively, and builds on the practicum meetings held during the first semester. The course will also introduce students to various approaches to foreign language teaching as well as to current issues in second language acquisition. Students who have already had a similar course at another institution may be exempted upon consultation with the instructor.
                                                                                                                        FREN 630-401 THE ROMAN DE LA ROSE AND THE FRENCH VERNACULAR CANON BROWNLEE, KEVIN WILLIAMS HALL 516 T 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary. Previous topics include The Grail and the Rose, Literary Genres and Transformations, and Readings in Old French Texts. Please see French department's website for current course description: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc The course will be centered on an extended reading of all of the 13th-century Roman de la Rose--the single most widely read and influential literary work of the French Middle Ages. We will study the ways in which the Rose redefines the status of the French vernacular as a “canonical” literary language, while establishing itself as the new foundational work in the French canon. Special attention will be given to how the Rose deploys conflicting discourses of desire and knowledge. We will begin by situating the Rose within the preceding French literary tradition, both lyric and narrative, focusing on the lyrics of the trouveres and on the romance narratives of Chrétien de Troyes. We will conclude with Christine de Pizan’s polemical reading of the Rose in the early 15th century.
                                                                                                                          FREN 684-401 THE NOVEL IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE 20TH CENTURY PRINCE, GERALD WILLIAMS HALL 516 M 0400PM-0600PM Topics vary. Please check the French department's website for the course description. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/french/pc A narratologically oriented study of the poetics of the modern French novel from Proust and Gide to surrealist "fiction" (Breton), existential and existentialist narratives (Malraux, Céline, Sartre, Camus), and the foreshadowings of the New Novel (Queneau).
                                                                                                                            FREN 997-000 TUTORIAL II Designed to allow students to broaden their background knowledge, usually in the area of their Ph.D. Final Examinations.
                                                                                                                              SEE DEPT. FOR SECTION NUMBERS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT