Courses for Fall 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 000-050 DUTCH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: PECS COURSE
    STUDY ABROAD
    DTCH 101-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT WILLIAMS HALL 5 TR 0430PM-0600PM A first semester language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch.
      DTCH 501-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT WILLIAMS HALL 5 TR 0430PM-0600PM A first semester Dutch language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch.
        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
        DTCH 574-401 POLITICS AND SOCIETIES IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD WILLIAMS HALL 741 R 0130PM-0430PM In this seminar, we will discuss how early modern globalization affected societies and the ways their members and rulers made politics. Following a historiographical introduction, it is divided in three sections. In the first, we will concentrate on empires and kings in order to detect common features of dynastic power across the globe and to explore how such characteristics influenced each other. Second, we will shift our attention to citizens and the ways they made politics in their city-states. For a long time, research on citizenship has been confined to the post-revolutionary nation states. However, recent research suggests that urban citizenship has far deeper roots in medieval and early modern cities. Up to now most research has focused on urban centers in Western Europe and more precisely on the so-called urban belt stretching from Central and North-Italy, over Switzerland and Southern Germany to the Rhineland and the Low Countries. Comparisons with urban centers in Asia and the colonial Americas will be needed to test that view. In the third section, we will study the people who provided information to societies and decision makers. Often, they held multiple identities or they acted as religious or ethnic outsiders. Therefore, we call them, with a term borrowed from anthropology 'brokers'. Taken together, the analysis of these aspects will deepen our understanding of politics and societies in the globalizing early modern world. Thus, the seminar will contribute to a more comprehensive, less Europe-centered view on that period. Instructor: Professor Hans Cools, Visiting Brueghel Professor
          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
          GRMN 026-401 JEWS AND CHINA: VIEWS FROM TWO PERSPECTIVES HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN FISHER-BENNETT HALL 201 TR 0130PM-0300PM Jews in China??? Who knew??? The history of the Jews in China, both modern and medieval, is an unexpected and fascinating case of cultural exchange. Even earlier than the 10th century. Jewish trader from India or Persia on the Silk Road, settled in Kaifeng, the capital of the Northern Song Dynasty, and established a Jewish community that lasted through the nineteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century, Jewish merchants, mainly from Iraq, often via India, arrived in China and played a major role in the building of modern Shanghei. After 1898, Jews from Russia settled in the northern Chinese city of Harbin, first as traders and later as refugees from the Bolshevik Revolution and Russian Civil War. In the first decades of the twentieth century, a few Jews from Poland and Russia visited China as tourists, drawn by a combination of curiosity about the cultural exoticism of a truly foreign culture and an affinity that Polish Jewish socialists and communists felt as these political movements began to emerge in China. During World War II, Shanghai served as a port of refuge for Jews from Central Europe. In this freshman seminar, we will explore how these Jewish traders, travelers, and refugees responded to and represented China in their writings. We will also read works by their Chinese contemporaries and others to see the responses to and perceptions of these Jews. We will ask questions about cultural translation: How do exchanges between languages, religions, and cultures affect the identities of individuals and communities? What commonalities and differences between these people emerge?
            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
            GRMN 027-301 Euro Zone Crisis - The EU in a Currency War for Survival? SHIELDS, SUSANNE TOWNE BUILDING 307 TR 1030AM-1200PM "Let me put it simply...there may be a contradiction between the interests of the financial world and the interests of the political world...We cannot keep constantly explaining to our voters and our citizens why the taxpayer should bear the cost of certain risks and not those people who have earned a lot of money from taking those risks." Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, at the G20 Summit, November 2010. In January 1999, a single monetary system united Germany, a core nation, with 10 other European states. Amidst the optimism of the euro's first days, most observers forecast that Europe would progress toward an ever closer union. Indeed, in the ensuing decade, the European Union became the world's largest trading area, the euro area expanded to include 17 member states, and the Lisbon Treaty enhanced the efficiency and democratic legitimacy of the Union. In 2009, Greece's debt crisis exposed deep rifts within the European Union and developed into a euro zone crisis - arguably the most difficult test Europe has faced in the past 60 years. After two years of a more benign EURO debt situation, the risk of recession, EU sanctions agains Russia, and a possible collision of a newly-elected Greek government with its creditors, the euro crisis returned with a vengeance in 2015. In addition, the pressure mounts for European leaders to find a solution to the refugee crisis which reached a peak in the fall of 2015. In 2016 the Brexit delivered the latest blow to the European Union, and the future of the European project without the UK looks bleak. The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is still fragile, and economic and political developments in 2017 could determine the future of the euro. Does the EU have what it takes to emerge from these crises? Will the European nations find a collective constructive solution that will lead to a fiscal union that implies further integration?
              ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
              GRMN 101-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I SHAFII, CAMERON EDUCATION BUILDING 008 MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                GRMN 101-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I DYER, SELENA WILLIAMS HALL 723 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                  GRMN 101-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I HACKING, MEREDITH FISHER-BENNETT HALL 20
                  COLLEGE HALL 311A
                  MWF 0100PM-0200PM
                  TR 0130PM-0230PM
                  Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                    GRMN 101-404 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I CANCELED Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                      GRMN 102-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER CANCELED This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                        GRMN 102-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 421 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                          GRMN 103-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 201 MTWR 1100AM-1200PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                            GRMN 103-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 4 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                              GRMN 103-403 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 304
                              WILLIAMS HALL 304
                              MW 0100PM-0200PM
                              TR 0130PM-0230PM
                              This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                                GRMN 104-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA CANCELED A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                  GRMN 104-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 216 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                    GRMN 106-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 421
                                    WILLIAMS HALL 202
                                    MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                                    TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                    This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. An intensive two credit course in which two semesters of elementary German (GRMN 101 & 102) are completed in one. Introduction to the basic elements of spoken and written German, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of communication skills. Readings and discussions focus on cultural differences. Expression and comprehension are then expanded through the study of literature and social themes.
                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                      GRMN 134-401 ORIGINS OF NAZISM: FROM DEMOCRACY TO RACE WAR AND GENOCIDE BERG, ANNE PERELMAN CENTER FOR POLITICAL 200 MW 0100PM-0200PM Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course.
                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                        GRMN 145-401 THE VIKINGS KUSKOWSKI, ADA MARIA WILLIAMS HALL 202 TR 1030AM-1200PM The Vikings were the terror of Europe from the late eight to the eleventh century. Norwegians, Danes and Swedes left their homeland to trade, raid and pillage; leaving survivors praying "Oh Lord, deliver us from the fury of the Norsemen!" While commonly associated with violent barbarism, the Norse were also farmers, craftsmen, and merchants. As their dragon ships sailed the waterways of Europe and beyond, they also transformed from raiders to explorers, discoverers and settlers of found and conquered lands. This course will introduce students to various facets of the culture and society of the Viking world ranging from honor culture, gender roles, political culture, mythology, and burial practices. We will also explore the range of Viking activity abroad from Kiev and Constantinople to Greenland and Vineland, the Viking settlement in North America. We will use material and archeological sources as well as literary and historical ones in order to think about how we know history and what questions we can ask from different sorts of sources. Notably, we will be reading Icelandic sagas that relate oral histories of heroes, outlaws, raiders and sailors that will lead us to question the lines between fact and fiction, and myth and history.
                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                          GRMN 150-401 WATER WORLDS RICHTER, SIMON MCNEIL BUILDING 286-7 TR 1030AM-1200PM As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we're accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar bear habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while low-lying cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges,tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. The basic question we'll be asking is: What can we learn from the humanities that will be helpful for confronting the problems and challenges caused by climate change and sea level rise?
                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                            GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE KAISER, JOHANNA WILLIAMS HALL 723 TR 0700PM-0800PM The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                                              CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                              GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 305 MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                GRMN 219-001 GERMAN BUSINESS WORLD: A Macro Perspective JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 1 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course offers you insights into the dynamics of Business German, while taking a macro approach. Examples of various course topics include: economic geography and its diversity, the changing role of the Eruopean Union, and the economic importance of national transportation and tourism. In addition, the course emphasizes the development of students' discourse competencies, Business German vocabulary and grammar. Course assignments include oral presentations on current events, class discussions, role-play, and collaborative group work. Class time will be utilized to practice speaking, answering questions, reviewing exercises and holding group discussions on various topics. Class participation is a key component of this course.
                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                  GRMN 237-401 BERLIN: HIST POL CULTURE WEISSBERG, LILIANE CANCELED What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and Koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, and its position as a center of the German and Jewish Enlightenment. It will follow Berlin's transformation into an industrial city in the nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structure, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we will read literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin, and focus on Berlin's Jewish history. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, urban studies, and German-Jewish studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduate students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin.
                                                    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                    GRMN 257-401 FASCIST CINEMAS MACLEOD, CATRIONA CANCELED Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
                                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                      GRMN 302-001 PLACES OF MEMORY BIAREISHYK, SIARHEI FISHER-BENNETT HALL 25 MWF 0100PM-0200PM What is culture? What is German? Where are the borders between German, Austrian and Swiss culture? What is part of the "cultural canon"? Who decides and what role does memory play? Relying on the theory of collective memory (Halbwachs) and the concept of "places of memory" (Erinnerungsorte; Nora, Francois/Schulze) and with reference to examplary scholarly and literary texts, debates, songs, films, documents, and paintings from high and pop culture, this course will weave a mosaic of that which (also) constitutes German or German-language culture. Instructor: Professor Siarhei Biareishyk
                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                        GRMN 381-301 DEUTSCHLAND SCHAFFT SICH AB...ODER ERFINDET SICH NEU? HAHMANN, ANDREE WILLIAMS HALL 220 TR 0130PM-0300PM Fall 2017 description: Deutschland steht aktuell vor einer Vielzahl von Herausforderungen, die teils wesentlich gesellschaftliche Bereiche betreffen. Man muss davon ausgehen, dass die heute getroffenen Entscheidungen die deutsche, aber auch europaeische Zukunft fuer eine nicht absehbare Zeit massgeblich beeinflussen werden. Viele der verhandelten Fragen und Probleme sind zum Teil eng miteinander verwoben und erfordern zur Bewaeltigung gesamtpolitisch uebergreifende Loesungsstrategien. Diese verlangen gegebenenfalls einen tiefgreifenden gesellschaftlichen, politischen und oekonomischen Wandel der bestehenden Verhaeltnisse, da zum Teil grundlegende Strukturen und Ueberzeugungen weiter Teile der Bevoelkerung betroffen sind. Aus diesem Grund werden Auffassungen, die lange Zeit als gesicherter Bestand des gesellschaftlichen Diskurses galten, infrage gestellt. Es ist daher nicht verwunderlich, dass die drohenden Veraenderungen reaktionaere Kraefte provozieren, die um die Erhaltung bestehender Verhaeltnisse besorgt sind. Denn es ist zu vermuten, dass der anstehende Wandel nicht alle betroffenen Gruppen besser stellen wird und vielleicht groessere Opfer erfordert, als bislang eingestanden wurde. Dieses Seminar wird einige der dringenden Fragestellungen thematisieren und somit versuchen, ein aktuelles Bild der bestehenden deutschen Verhaeltnisse zu vermitteln. Das eroeffnet den Blick auf eine moegliche Zukunft Deutschlands, aber auch Europas.
                                                          GRMN 401-001 TRANS(L)ITS SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 305 TR 1030AM-1200PM Drawing on Goethe's musings on "world literature", the course focuses on authors who have arrived at their German words via global, worldly itineraries. The course considers movements between languages, including those of the students themselves and encourages students to develop their own voice as authors via a series of critical and creative writing exercise. At the same time, students develop strategies to reflect on their own language learning. This course provides an important space for German-learners at Penn to draw on one another's experiences in the program and to build a sense of community. The course is required for all German majors in the Fall semester of their senior year.
                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                            GRMN 501-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I SHAFII, CAMERON EDUCATION BUILDING 008 MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                              GRMN 501-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I DYER, SELENA WILLIAMS HALL 723 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                GRMN 501-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I HACKING, MEREDITH FISHER-BENNETT HALL 20
                                                                COLLEGE HALL 311A
                                                                MWF 0100PM-0200PM
                                                                TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  GRMN 501-404 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I CANCELED
                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    GRMN 502-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER CANCELED
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                      GRMN 502-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 421 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                        GRMN 503-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 201 MTWR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                          GRMN 503-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 4 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                            GRMN 503-403 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 304
                                                                            WILLIAMS HALL 304
                                                                            MW 0100PM-0200PM
                                                                            TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                              GRMN 504-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA CANCELED
                                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                GRMN 504-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 216 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                  GRMN 505-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 421
                                                                                  WILLIAMS HALL 202
                                                                                  MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                                                                                  TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                    GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 305 MW 0200PM-0330PM
                                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                      GRMN 534-401 HISTORY LIT THEORY BRILMYER, S. PEARL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 17 R 0430PM-0730PM Over the last three decades, the fields of literary and cultural studies have been reconfigured by a variety of theoretical and methodological developments. Bracing-and-often confrontational-dialogues between theoretical and political positions as varied as Deconstruction. New Historicism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Queer Theory, Minority Discourse Theory, Colonial and Post-colonial Studies and Cultural Studies have, in particular, altered disciplinary agendas and intellectual priorities for students embarking on the /professional / study of literature. In this course, we will study key texts, statements and debates that define these issues, and will work towards a broad knowledge of the complex rewriting of the project of literary studies in process today. The readiing list will keep in mind the Examination List in Comparative Literature. We will not work towards complete coverage but will ask how crucial contemporary theorists engage with the longer history and institutional practices of literary criticism. There will be no examinations. Students will make one class presentation, which will then be reworked into a paper (1200-1500 words) to be submitted one week after the presentation. A second paper will be an annotated bibliography on a theoretical issue or issues that a student wishes to explore further. The bibliography will be developed in consultation with the instructor; it will typically include three or four books and six to eight articles or their equivalent. The annotated bibliography will be prefaced by a five or six page introduction; the whole will add up to between 5000 and 6000 words of prose. Students will prepare "position notes" each week, which will either be posted on a weblog or circulated in class.
                                                                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                        GRMN 543-401 Environmental Humanities: Theory, Method, Practice WIGGIN, BETHANY WILLIAMS HALL 741 W 0200PM-0500PM Environmental Humanities: Theory, Methods, Practice is a seminar-style course designed to introduce students to the trans- and interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities. Weekly readings and discussions will be complemented by guest speakers from a range of disciplines including ecology, atmospheric science, computing, history of science, medicine, anthropology, literature, and the visual arts. Participants will develop their own research questions and a final project, with special consideration given to building the multi-disciplinary collaborative teams research in the environmental humanities often requires.
                                                                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                          GRMN 561-301 THE LONG 18TH CENTURY RICHTER, SIMON R 0300PM-0500PM The aim of this anchor course is to acquaint students with the literary, philosophical, and cultural complexity of the "long eighteenth century," roughly 1648-1806. Often associated with the enlightenment and the revolutions it inspired, the eighteenth century is a prolonged period in which institutions of power and knowledge come under pressure and are reconfigured. Old institutions are submitted to the critique of reason, while new institutions of governance, sociability, gender, race and class create new spaces for cultural production. Students will analyze representative works in context and in combination with current scholarship.
                                                                                            CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                            GRMN 574-401 POLITICS AND SOCIETIES IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD WILLIAMS HALL 741 R 0130PM-0430PM In this seminar, we will discuss how early modern globalization affected societies and the ways their members and rulers made politics. Following a historiographical introduction, it is divided in three sections. In the first, we will concentrate on empires and kings in order to detect common features of dynastic power across the globe and to explore how such characteristics influenced each other. Second, we will shift our attention to citizens and the ways they made politics in their city-states. For a long time, research on citizenship has been confined to the post-revolutionary nation states. However, recent research suggests that urban citizenship has far deeper roots in medieval and early modern cities. Up to now most research has focused on urban centers in Western Europe and more precisely on the so-called urban belt stretching from Central and North-Italy, over Switzerland and Southern Germany to the Rhineland and the Low Countries. Comparisons with urban centers in Asia and the colonial Americas will be needed to test that view. In the third section, we will study the people who provided information to societies and decision makers. Often, they held multiple identities or they acted as religious or ethnic outsiders. Therefore, we call them, with a term borrowed from anthropology 'brokers'. Taken together, the analysis of these aspects will deepen our understanding of politics and societies in the globalizing early modern world. Thus, the seminar will contribute to a more comprehensive, less Europe-centered view on that period. Instructor: Professor Hans Cools, Visiting Brueghel Professor
                                                                                              ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                              GRMN 583-401 HEGEL HORSTMANN, ROLF-PETER GODDARD LAB 102 R 0300PM-0600PM Topics vary annually.
                                                                                                GRMN 605-401 MOD LIT THEORY & CRIT GOULET, ANDREA VAN PELT LIBRARY 402 F 0200PM-0500PM This course will provide an overview of major European thinkers in literary theory of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will pay particular attention to the following movements: Structuralism and Deconstruction (Levi-Strauss, Jakobson, Barthes, Derrida), Social Theory (Foucault, Ranciere), Psychoanalysis (Freud, Lacan, Abraham and Torok), Schizoanalysis (Deleuze and Guattari), Feminism and Queer Theory (Irigary, Kristeva, Sedgwick), Spatial Theory (Bachelard, DeCerteau, Lefebvre), and the Frankfurt School (Adorno and Horkheimer, Kracauer). Readings and discussion will be in English.
                                                                                                  ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                  GRMN 612-401 HANNAH ARENDT WEISSBERG, LILIANE CANCELED The seminar will consider Hannah Arendt's early Jewish writings. It will then center on Arendt's major work, The Origins of Totalitarianism (in particular, the sections on "Antisemitism" and "Imperialism"). Finally, we will discuss Arendt's controversial study on Eichmann in Jerusalem.
                                                                                                    ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                    GRMN 677-401 ONTOGENESIS, MORPHOLOGY, LITERATURE BIAREISHYK, SIARHEI WILLIAMS HALL 23 M 0300PM-0500PM In recent years, the notions of form, formalism, and morphology have reentered contemporary debates across the humanities. This seminar considers the current resurgence of interest in form by tracing form's evolving concepts throughout modernity. It departs from the observation that experimentation with and debates on form in art and literature are inextricably linked to various notions of life and the living. These debates-this is the provisional thesis of the seminar-are the battlefield where literary and art criticism undermine the major presuppositions of the western metaphysical tradition (e.g., determinations of inside-outside, form-content, living-inorganic). On the one hand, the seminar will explore a selective genealogy of various attempts to dynamize the concept of form through theories of 1) ontogenesis (e.g., Spinoza, Simondon, Malabou), 2) morphology (e.g., Goethe, Propp, Goldstein), and 3) aesthetics (e.g., Baumgarten, Schlegel brothers, Adorno). On the other hand, in order to investigate the political, ideological, and methodological implications of differing concepts of form, the seminar will bring together texts from different disciplines, including literary studies (literary morphology, Russian Formalism), art history (Focillon, Kubler), philosophy (Wittgenstein, Macherey), On the other hand, in order to investigate the political, ideological, and methodological implications of differing concepts of form, the seminar will bring together texts from different disciplines ranging from literary studies (e.g., Jolles, Russian Formalism, Jauss), art history (e.g., Panofsky, Focillon, Kubler), philosophy (e.g., Wittgenstein, Blumenberg, Macherey), history of science (e.g., Vygotsky, Varela),and sociology (e.g., Tarde, DeLanda). Finally, the seminar will engage in close reading of exemplary literary and art works, and situate the findings on the conjunction of form and life in current debates on New Formalisms (e.g., Levine, Levinson, Kornbluh) and New Materialisms (e.g., Bennett, Grosz).
                                                                                                      ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                      GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP RICHTER, SIMON WILLIAMS HALL 440 T 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                        GRMN 701-301 PEDAGOGY ROUNDTABLE FREI, CHRISTINA WILLIAMS HALL 305 T 0300PM-0400PM GRMN Ph.D. requirement
                                                                                                          SCND 101-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA WILLIAMS HALL 438 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part one of the elementary level Swedish course. The first-year language course introduces you to contemporary Swedish and Nordic society, culture, and history. Students actively participate in class in discussion, assignments and projects. You will learn to understand and use basic language in a contemporary everyday-life context. The course will offer individualized opportunities to explore Swedish and to reflect over how it fits with your continued academic and personal development.
                                                                                                            SCND 501-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA WILLIAMS HALL 438 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part one of the elementary level Swedish course. The first-year language course introduces you to contemporary Swedish and Nordic society, culture, and history. Students actively participate in class in discussion, assignments and projects. You will learn to understand and use basic language in a contemporary everyday-life context. The course will offer individualized opportunities to explore Swedish and to reflect over how it fits with your continued academic and personal development.
                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                              YDSH 101-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER MCNEIL BUILDING 582 TR 1200PM-0130PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                YDSH 103-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN FISHER-BENNETT HALL 406 TR 0300PM-0430PM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                  YDSH 501-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER MCNEIL BUILDING 582 TR 1200PM-0130PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                    YDSH 503-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN FISHER-BENNETT HALL 406 TR 0300PM-0430PM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE