Courses for Fall 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 103-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM A third semester Dutch language course. The emphasis lies on vocabulary expansion through the use of audio-taped materials and readings. Grammar is expanded beyond the basics and focuses on compound sentences, features of text coherence and idiomatic language usage.
    DTCH 503-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM A third semester Dutch language course. The emphasis lies on vocabulary expansion through the use of audio-taped materials and readings. Grammar is expanded beyond the basics and focuses on compound sentences, features of text coherence and idiomatic language usage.
      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
      GRMN 016-301 BABYLON BERLIN: GERMAN CRIME BOOKS FREI, CHRISTINA TR 1200PM-0130PM Why are crime books and crime shows so popular? 2017 marked a moment in time when a serialized domestic TV show took off in Germany like wild fire. The first three episodes of "Babylon Berlin" were seen by an average 7.8 million viewers on ARD last year, achieving a 24.5% share and reaching a peak of 8.5 million. On Sky, it boasted the best ratings ever for a non-English series and was only beaten overall by the seventh season of "Game of Thrones." Babylon Berlin is based on Volker Kutscher's crime books. Thus, this course will trace the success of German crime books as a best-selling genre by analyzing the appeal of the whodunit format and by questioning the transnational appeal of this genre. "Babylon Berlin" exemplifies the success of German crime books because the treatment of historical events combined with a critical eye toward the Zeitgeist of cultural products sheds light on the representation of culture and its co-construction of a transnational identity.
        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
        GRMN 027-301 Euro Zone Crisis - The EU in a Currency War for Survival? SHIELDS, SUSANNE TR 1030AM-1200PM "Let me put it simply...there may be a contradiction between the interests of the financial world and the interests of the political world...We cannot keep constantly explaining to our voters and our citizens why the taxpayer should bear the cost of certain risks and not those people who have earned a lot of money from taking those risks." Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, at the G20 Summit, November 2010. In January 1999, a single monetary system united Germany, a core nation, with 10 other European states. Amidst the optimism of the euro's first days, most observers forecast that Europe would progress toward an ever closer union. Indeed, in the ensuing decade, the European Union became the world's largest trading area, the euro area expanded to include 17 member states, and the Lisbon Treaty enhanced the efficiency and democratic legitimacy of the Union. In 2009, Greece's debt crisis exposed deep rifts within the European Union and developed into a euro zone crisis - arguably the most difficult test Europe has faced in the past 60 years. After two years of a more benign EURO debt situation, the risk of recession, EU sanctions agains Russia, and a possible collision of a newly-elected Greek government with its creditors, the euro crisis returned with a vengeance in 2015. In addition, the pressure mounts for European leaders to find a solution to the refugee crisis which reached a peak in the fall of 2015. In 2016 the Brexit delivered the latest blow to the European Union, and the future of the European project without the UK looks bleak. The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is still fragile, and economic and political developments in 2017 could determine the future of the euro. Does the EU have what it takes to emerge from these crises? Will the European nations find a collective constructive solution that will lead to a fiscal union that implies further integration?
          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FOR FRESHMEN ONLY; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
          GRMN 101-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
            GRMN 101-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
              GRMN 101-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I MWF 0100PM-0200PM
              TR 0130PM-0230PM
              Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                GRMN 102-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                  GRMN 103-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I MTWR 1100AM-1200PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                    GRMN 103-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I HACKING, MEREDITH MTWR 1200PM-0100PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                      GRMN 103-403 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0100PM-0200PM
                      TR 0130PM-0230PM
                      This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                        GRMN 104-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                          GRMN 106-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                          TR 0900AM-1030AM
                          This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. An intensive two credit course in which two semesters of elementary German (GRMN 101 & 102) are completed in one. Introduction to the basic elements of spoken and written German, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of communication skills. Readings and discussions focus on cultural differences. Expression and comprehension are then expanded through the study of literature and social themes.
                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                            GRMN 134-401 ORIGINS OF NAZISM: FROM DEMOCRACY TO RACE WAR AND GENOCIDE BERG, ANNE MW 1000AM-1100AM Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course.
                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                              GRMN 150-401 WATER WORLDS RICHTER, SIMON TR 0130PM-0300PM As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we're accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar bear habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while low-lying cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges,tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. The basic question we'll be asking is: What can we learn from the humanities that will be helpful for confronting the problems and challenges caused by climate change and sea level rise?
                                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE KAISER, JOHANNA TR 0700PM-0800PM The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                                  CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                  GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                    GRMN 219-001 GERMAN BUSINESS WORLD: A Macro Perspective JAMES, DAVID MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course offers you insights into the dynamics of Business German, while taking a macro approach. Examples of various course topics include: economic geography and its diversity, the changing role of the Eruopean Union, and the economic importance of national transportation and tourism. In addition, the course emphasizes the development of students' discourse competencies, Business German vocabulary and grammar. Course assignments include oral presentations on current events, class discussions, role-play, and collaborative group work. Class time will be utilized to practice speaking, answering questions, reviewing exercises and holding group discussions on various topics. Class participation is a key component of this course. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of economics or business required. Course taught in German.
                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                      GRMN 237-401 BERLIN: HIST POL CULTURE WEISSBERG, LILIANE TR 1030AM-1200PM What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and Koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, and its position as a center of the German and Jewish Enlightenment. It will follow Berlin's transformation into an industrial city in the nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structure, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we will read literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin, and focus on Berlin's Jewish history. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, urban studies, and German-Jewish studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduate students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin. All readings and lectures in English.
                                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                        GRMN 248-401 NIETZSCHE'S MODERNITY CANCELED "God is dead." This famous, all too famous death sentence, issued by the 19th-century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, also signaled the genesis of a radical challenge to traditional notions of morality, cultural life, and the structure of society as a whole. In this course we will examine both the "modernity" of Nietzsche's thought and the ways in which his ideas have helped to define the very concept of Modernity (and, arguably, Postmodernity) itself. In exploring the origin and evolution of Nietzsche's key concepts, we will trace the ways in which his work has been variously revered or refuted, championed or co-opted, for more than a century. We will survey his broad influence on everything from philosophy and literature to music and art, theater and psychology, history and cultural theory, politics and popular culture. Further, we will ask how his ideas continue to challenge us today, though perhaps in unexpected ways. As we will see, Nietzsche wanted to teach us "how to philosophize with a hammer." All readings and lectures in English.
                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                          GRMN 258-401 GERMAN CINEMA FLEISHMAN, IAN TR 0300PM-0430PM An introduction to the momentous history of German film, from its beginnings before World War One to developments following the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and German reunification in 1990. With an eye to film's place in its historical and political context, the course will explore the "Golden Age" of German cinema in the Weimar Republic, when Berlin vied with Hollywood; the complex relationship between Nazi ideology and entertainment during the Third Reich; the fate of German film-makers in exile during the Hitler years; post-war film production in both West and East Germany; the call for an alternative to "Papa's Kino" and the rise of New German Cinema in the 1960's. All readings and discussions in English.
                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                            GRMN 262-401 WOMEN IN JEWISH LIT HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 0130PM-0300PM "Jewish woman, who knows your life? In darkness you have come, in darkness do you go." J. L. Gordon (1890). This course will bring into the light the long tradition of women as readers, writers, and subjects in Jewish literature. All texts will be in translation from Yiddish and Hebrew, or in English. Through a variety of genres -- devotional literature, memoir, fiction, and poetry -- we will study women's roles and selves, the relations of women and men, and the interaction between Jewish texts and women's lives. The legacy of women in Yiddish devotional literature will serve as background for our reading of modern Jewish fiction and poetry from the past century. The course is divided into five segments. The first presents a case study of the Matriarchs Rachel and Leah, as they are portrayed in the Hebrew Bible, in rabbinic commentary, in pre-modern prayers, and in modern poems. We then examine a modern novel that recasts the story of Dinah, Leah's daughter. Next we turn to the seventeenth century Glikl of Hamel, the first Jewish woman memoirist. The third segment focuses on devotional literature for and by women. In the fourth segment, we read modern women poets in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. The course concludes with a fifth segment on fiction written by women in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. All readings and lectures in English.
                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                              GRMN 302-001 PLACES OF MEMORY BIAREISHYK, SIARHEI TR 0130PM-0300PM What is culture? What is German? Where are the borders between German, Austrian and Swiss culture? What is part of the "cultural canon"? Who decides and what role does memory play? Relying on the theory of collective memory (Halbwachs) and the concept of "places of memory" (Erinnerungsorte; Nora, Francois/Schulze) and with reference to examplary scholarly and literary texts, debates, songs, films, documents, and paintings from high and pop culture, this course will weave a mosaic of that which (also) constitutes German or German-language culture. Prerequisite: This course will be offered every fall semester. Taught in German.
                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                GRMN 373-301 CRITICAL THEORY OF CHRISTA WOLF: WHAT REMAINS? FREI, CHRISTINA CANCELED Understood as one of the most prominent writers of the GDR, Christa Wolf's literary contributions shape cultural production of former East Germany and beyond. Nevertheless, her critical engagement with the writing process and the role that memory plays for identity formation and a collective historical process remain less known. This course will shed light on Wolf's iconographic text Die Dimension des Autors, in which she develops the notion of fossilization--medallions of memory--to unpack cultural and historical productions. Indeed, the course traces her most influential texts such as Storfall, Kassandra, Kindheitsmuster and Was bleibt? within her theoretical framework, thereby offering students an opportunity to connect East German literary production with critical theory. The course seeks to illuminate the intrinsic connections between cultural products, practices and perspectives. The course will be taught in German and could fulfill Cross-Cultural Analysis.
                                                  GRMN 401-001 TRANS(L)ITS FREI, CHRISTINA TR 1030AM-1200PM Drawing on Goethe's musings on "world literature", the course focuses on authors who have arrived at their German words via global, worldly itineraries. The course considers movements between languages, including those of the students themselves and encourages students to develop their own voice as authors via a series of critical and creative writing exercise. At the same time, students develop strategies to reflect on their own language learning. This course provides an important space for German-learners at Penn to draw on one another's experiences in the program and to build a sense of community. The course is required for all German majors in the Fall semester of their senior year. Prerequisite: This course will be offered every fall semester.
                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                    GRMN 501-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                      GRMN 501-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                        GRMN 501-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I MWF 0100PM-0200PM
                                                        TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                          GRMN 502-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                            GRMN 503-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I MTWR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                              GRMN 503-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I HACKING, MEREDITH MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                GRMN 503-403 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0100PM-0200PM
                                                                TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  GRMN 504-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    GRMN 505-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                                                                    TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                      GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                        GRMN 534-401 HISTORY LIT THEORY COPELAND, RITA T 1200PM-0300PM Over the last three decades, the fields of literary and cultural studies have been reconfigured by a variety of theoretical and methodological developments. Bracing-and-often confrontational-dialogues between theoretical and political positions as varied as Deconstruction. New Historicism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Queer Theory, Minority Discourse Theory, Colonial and Post-colonial Studies and Cultural Studies have, in particular, altered disciplinary agendas and intellectual priorities for students embarking on the /professional / study of literature. In this course, we will study key texts, statements and debates that define these issues, and will work towards a broad knowledge of the complex rewriting of the project of literary studies in process today. The readiing list will keep in mind the Examination List in Comparative Literature. We will not work towards complete coverage but will ask how crucial contemporary theorists engage with the longer history and institutional practices of literary criticism. There will be no examinations. Students will make one class presentation, which will then be reworked into a paper (1200-1500 words) to be submitted one week after the presentation. A second paper will be an annotated bibliography on a theoretical issue or issues that a student wishes to explore further. The bibliography will be developed in consultation with the instructor; it will typically include three or four books and six to eight articles or their equivalent. The annotated bibliography will be prefaced by a five or six page introduction; the whole will add up to between 5000 and 6000 words of prose. Students will prepare "position notes" each week, which will either be posted on a weblog or circulated in class.
                                                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                          GRMN 545-401 BENJAMIN ON KAFKA FLEISHMAN, IAN W 0200PM-0500PM Readings and discussions in English. Walter Benjamin's study of the works of Franz Kafka is as enlightening as it can be bewildering. Moving from philology to Marxism, metaphysics to messianism, Daoism to Talmud, this densely argued piece elliptically touches on almost all of Kafka's published works in just four short sections. This seminar proposes a line-by-line reading Benjamin's 1934 "Franz Kafka on the Tenth Anniversary of His Death" with an eye to its literary, philosophical and religious contexts as well as to the rich history of its intellectual reception. Reading Kafka's works as the essay evokes them, we will situate this piece with regard to Benjamin's other writings, the essay's interlocutors (Brod, Scholem, Lukacs, Brecht) and its most illustrious interpreters (Adorno, Arendt, Celan, Hamacher).
                                                                            ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                            GRMN 558-301 THE LONG 19TH CENTURY WEISSBERG, LILIANE T 0300PM-0500PM
                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                              GRMN 578-401 PRIVACY AND SOCIETY: DUTCH PAINTING IN THE 17TH CENTURY BRISMAN, SHIRA W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies from semester to semester. For the Fall 2020 semester, the topic will be: Privacy and Society: Dutch Painting in the Seventeenth Century. How do paintings offer occasions for personal reflection, and how do they construct social bonds? The burgeoning art market of the Dutch Golden Age offered both new forms of intimacy--inviting the beholder into domestic interiors to observe the events of everyday life--and public statements about leadership, social structures, and national identity. Freed from the patronage of churches and courts, Dutch artists produced pictures that could be purchased for the home--landscapes, moralizing genre scenes, still lifes, and portraits. They also made paintings for public spaces such as guild halls and charitable organizations, which map the relationships between members of civic organizations. The aim of this course is to develop a set of critical skills for analyzing the different ways in which seventeenth-century Dutch paintings drew upon shared social values, national identity and economic pride, how they appealed to individual buyer tastes, and how they have engaged and poetic minds. We will address these matters in a focused study of the exhibition at the Arthur Ross Gallery, An Inner World: Seventeenth-Century Dutch Genre Painting, which gathers together works of artists such as Gerrit Dou, Gabriel Metsu, Dominicus van Tol, Willem van Mieris, and Jacob Toorenvliet from the Leiden Collection in New York, the Clark Art Institute, as well as printed books and manuscripts from the Kislak Center. Along with a trip to New York to study drawings and paintings from the period, we will also engage closely with objects at the Philadelphia Museum of Art--both on view and off. In writing assignments, we will attend to the representation of space, considering domestic interiors, urban settings, church architecture, imperial arenas, and landscapes both real and imagined.
                                                                                ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                                                GRMN 605-401 MOD LIT THEORY & CRIT PLATT, KEVIN T 0300PM-0600PM This course will provide an overview of major European thinkers in critical theory of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will pay particular attention to critical currents that originated in Eastern European avant-garde and early socialist contexts and their legacies and successors. Topics covered will include: Russian Formalism and its successors in Structuralism and Deconstruction (Shklovsky, Levi-Strauss, Jakobson, Derrida); Bakhtin and his circle, dialogism and its later western reception; debates over aesthetics and politics of the 1930s (Lukacs, Brecht, Adorno, Benjamin, Radek, Clement Greenberg); the October group; Marxism, new Left criticism, and later lefts (Althusser, Williams, Eagleton, Jameson, Zizek).
                                                                                  ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                  GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP FLEISHMAN, IAN T 0900AM-1030AM GRMN Ph.D. requirement
                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                    GRMN 701-301 PEDAGOGY ROUNDTABLE FREI, CHRISTINA GRMN Ph.D. requirement
                                                                                      SWED 103-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM In part one of the intermediate year, students will research and explore a broad range of topics using authentic sources and course materials to gain greater fluency and familiarity with language and culture. You will meet native Swedish speakers and visit Swedish organizations in the Philadelphia area. Projects and assignments will give you ample opportunity to explore areas that are of special interest to you from academic, professional, and personal perspectives. We will learn about Swedish innovation, business, socio-economic and political structures, geography, tourism, migration, history, and about what it is like to live in Sweden today.
                                                                                        SWED 503-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM In part one of the intermediate year, students will research and explore a broad range of topics using authentic sources and course materials to gain greater fluency and familiarity with language and culture. You will meet native Swedish speakers and visit Swedish organizations in the Philadelphia area. Projects and assignments will give you ample opportunity to explore areas that are of special interest to you from academic, professional, and personal perspectives. We will learn about Swedish innovation, business, socio-economic and political structures, geography, tourism, migration, history, and about what it is like to live in Sweden today.
                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                          YDSH 101-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1030AM-1200PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                            YDSH 103-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 1030AM-1200PM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                              YDSH 501-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1030AM-1200PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                YDSH 503-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 1030AM-1200PM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE