Courses for Spring 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 104-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM A fourth semester Dutch language course.
    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
    DTCH 153-401 EURO SPIRITUAL CRISIS? MW 0200PM-0330PM Is Europe Facing a Spiritual Crisis? On Contemporary Debates about Secularization, Religion and Rationality. Point of departure for this course is the difference between Europe and the US as to the role of religion in the unfolding of their respective "cultural identities" (cf. Charles Taylor, A Secular Age, 522-530). As a rule, both the US and Western Europe are now defined as secularized cultures, even if their histories and specific identities are strongly rooted in the Christian heritage. Given this contemporary situation, four research questions will be dealt with in this course. 1) What is meant by secularization? In answer to that question, two secularization theories are distinguished: the classic versus the alternative secularization thesis; 2) What is the historical impact of the nominalist turning-point at the end of the Middle Ages in this process towards secularization? 3) How did the relation between rationality and religion develop during modern times in Europe? 4) What is the contemporary outcome of this evolution in so-called postmodern / post-secular Europe and US? We currently find ourselves in this so-called postmodern or post-secular period, marked by a sensitivity to the boundaries of (modern) rationality and to the fragility of our (modern) views on man, world and God. In this respect, we will focus on different parts of Europe (Western and Eastern Europe alike) and will refer to analogies and differences between Western Europe and US. This historical-thematic exposition is illustrated by means of important fragments from Western literature (and marginally from documents in other arts) and philosophy. We use these fragments in order to make more concrete the internal philosophical evolutions in relation to corresponding changes in diverse social domains (religion, politics, economy, society, literature, art...).
      ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
      DTCH 504-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM
        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
        GRMN 101-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
          GRMN 102-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
            GRMN 102-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
              GRMN 102-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MWF 0100PM-0200PM
              TR 0130PM-0230PM
              This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                GRMN 102-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MW 0600PM-0830PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                  GRMN 103-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWR 1200PM-0100PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                    GRMN 104-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1100AM-1200PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                      GRMN 104-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                        GRMN 106-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                        TR 0900AM-1030AM
                        This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. An intensive two credit course in which two semesters of elementary German (GRMN 101 & 102) are completed in one. Introduction to the basic elements of spoken and written German, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of communication skills. Readings and discussions focus on cultural differences. Expression and comprehension are then expanded through the study of literature and social themes.
                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                          GRMN 107-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                          TR 1030AM-1200PM
                          This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                            GRMN 150-401 WATER WORLDS: WATER WORLDS:CULTURAL RESPONSES to SEA LEVEL RISE & CATASTROPHIC FLOODING RICHTER, SIMON TR 0130PM-0300PM As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we're accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar bear habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while low-lying cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges,tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. The basic question we'll be asking is: What can we learn from the humanities that will be helpful for confronting the problems and challenges caused by climate change and sea level rise?
                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                              GRMN 153-401 EURO SPIRITUAL CRISIS? MW 0200PM-0330PM Is Europe Facing a Spiritual Crisis? On Contemporary Debates about Secularization, Religion and Rationality. Point of departure for this course is the difference between Europe and the US as to the role of religion in the unfolding of their respective "cultural identities" (cf. Charles Taylor, A Secular Age, 522-530). As a rule, both the US and Western Europe are now defined as secularized cultures, even if their histories and specific identities are strongly rooted in the Christian heritage. Given this contemporary situation, four research questions will be dealt with in this course. 1) What is meant by secularization? In answer to that question, two secularization theories are distinguished: the classic versus the alternative secularization thesis; 2) What is the historical impact of the nominalist turning-point at the end of the Middle Ages in this process towards secularization? 3) How did the relation between rationality and religion develop during modern times in Europe? 4) What is the contemporary outcome of this evolution in so-called postmodern / post-secular Europe and US? We currently find ourselves in this so-called postmodern or post-secular period, marked by a sensitivity to the boundaries of (modern) rationality and to the fragility of our (modern) views on man, world and God. In this respect, we will focus on different parts of Europe (Western and Eastern Europe alike) and will refer to analogies and differences between Western Europe and US. This historical-thematic exposition is illustrated by means of important fragments from Western literature (and marginally from documents in other arts) and philosophy. We use these fragments in order to make more concrete the internal philosophical evolutions in relation to corresponding changes in diverse social domains (religion, politics, economy, society, literature, art...).
                                ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE BRIE, EVELYNE TBA TBA- The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                  GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                    GRMN 220-001 Business German: A Micro Perspective JAMES, DAVID MW 0200PM-0330PM This course is designed to enhance your speaking, reading and writing skills, in addition to helping you build a strong foundation in business vocabulary. Course objectives include acquiring skills in cross cultural communication, teamwork, business management, and creating a business plan. German grammar will be covered on a need be basis. This course will prepare you to perform and contribute while in a German-speaking business environment.
                                      FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                      GRMN 253-401 FREUD WEISSBERG, LILIANE TR 1030AM-1200PM No other person of the twentieth century has probably influenced scientific thought, humanistic scholarship, medical therapy, and popular culture as much as Sigmund Freud. This course will study his work, its cultural background, and its impact on us today. In the first part of the course, we will learn about Freud's life and the Viennese culture of his time. We will then move to a discussion of seminal texts, such as excerpts from his Interpretation of Dreams, case studies, as well as essays on psychoanalytic practice, human development, definitions of gender and sex, neuroses, and culture in general. In the final part of the course, we will discuss the impact of Freud's work. Guest lectureres from the medical field, history of science, psychology, and the humnities will offer insights into the reception of Freud's work, and its consequences for various fields of study and therapy.
                                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                        GRMN 263-401 JEWISH AMERICAN LIT HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 1200PM-0130PM What makes Jewish American literature Jewish? What makes it American? This course will address these questions about ethnic literature through fiction, poetry, drama, and other writings by Jews in America, from their arrival in 1654 to the present. We will discuss how Jewish identity and ethnicity shape literature and will consider how form and language develop as Jewish writers "immigrate" from Yiddish, Hebrew, and other languages to American English. Our readings, from Jewish American Literature: A Norton Anthology, will include a variety of stellar authors, both famous and less-known, including Isaac Mayer Wise, Emma Lazarus, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Celia Dropkin, Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, and Allegra Goodman. Students will come away from this course having explored the ways that Jewish culture intertwines with American culture in literature.
                                          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                          GRMN 301-001 HANDSCHRIFT-HYPERTEXT NELSON, DAVID MWF 0100PM-0200PM This course will provide an introduction to German-language literary studies through exemplary readings of short forms: fables, fairy tales, aphorisms, stories, novellas, feuilletons, poems, songs, radio plays, film clips, web projects and others. Paying particular attention to how emergent technology influences genre, we will trace an evolution from Minnesang to rock songs, from early print culture to the internet age and from Handschrift to hypertext. Students will have ample opportunity to improve their spoken and written German through class discussion and a series of internet-based assignments. Readings and discussions in German.
                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                            GRMN 323-401 WRITING IN DARK TIMES RICHTER, SIMON F 0900AM-1200PM The rise of Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 radically disrupted the literary marketplace in Germany. Public book burnings were the most visible sign of a complete reorganization of the literary world. What was it like to be a writer in the Third Reich? How did censorship work? What kind of choices were writers forced to make? What political roles did writers adopt? Under what conditions could they publish? Who read their books and how did they read them? These are some of the questions we will ask as we become acquainted with German writers in ideological adherence or alliance, in exile throughout Europe and the Americas, in "inner emigration," even in concentration camps, and in hiding. By focusing on their writing, we will shed light on the value of literature in dark times.
                                              GRMN 403-301 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM FLEISHMAN, IAN TBA TBA-
                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                GRMN 501-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                  GRMN 502-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                    GRMN 502-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                      GRMN 502-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MWF 0100PM-0200PM
                                                      TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                        GRMN 502-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MW 0600PM-0830PM
                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                          GRMN 503-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                            GRMN 504-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                              GRMN 504-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                GRMN 505-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                                                                TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                  GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0200PM-0330PM
                                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                    GRMN 511-301 STYLISTICS FLEISHMAN, IAN Textual analysis based on communication theory. Texts selected from literature and other disciplines. Emphasis placed on the development of the student's own compositional and stylistic skills.
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                      GRMN 514-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                      TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                                        GRMN 516-301 TEACHING METHODS FREI, CHRISTINA MW 0900AM-1100AM This course examines major foreign language methodologies, introduces resources available to foreign language teachers, and addresses current issues and concerns of foreign language teaching and learning, such as second language acquisition theory and application of technology.
                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                          GRMN 527-401 APPEARANCES FROM DESCARTES TO CHISHOLM HATFIELD, GARY R 0300PM-0600PM An investigation of issues that arise from scientific psychology and are investigated philosophically or have implications for philosophy. Specific topics vary by semester. In Spring 2019 the seminar will examine various instances of appealing to appearances in analyzing perception and its relation to an external world. Authors to be studied include Descartes, Hume, Russell, Sellars, and Chisholm.
                                                                            ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                            GRMN 537-401 TRANSLATING LITERATURE HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN R 0300PM-0500PM The greats all have something to say about translation. The Hebrew poet H. N. Bialik is attributed with saying that “he who reads the Bible in translation is like a man who kisses his bride through a veil.” That, however, is a mistranslation: What Bialik really wrote was, “Whoever knows Judaism through translation is like a person who kisses his mother through a handkerchief." (http://benyehuda.org/bialik/dvarim02.html), a saying that he probably translated and adapted from Russian or German. (https://networks.h-net.org/node/28655/discussions/116448/query-bialik-kissing-bride) Robert Frost wrote, “I could define poetry this way: it is that which is lost out of both prose and verse in translation.” Walter Benjamin defines it: “Translation is a form. To comprehend it as a form, one must go back to the original, for the laws governing the translation lie within the original, contained in the issue of its translatability.” Lawrence Venuti rails against translation that domesticates, rather than foreignizes, thus betraying the foreign text through a contrived familiarity that makes the translator invisible. Emily Wilson wants her translation “to bring out the way I think the original text handles it. [The original text] allows you to see the perspective of the people who are being killed.” https://bookriot.com/2017/12/04/emily-wilson-translation-the-odyssey/ Is translation erotic? A form of filial love? Incestuous? A mode of communion, or idol worship? Is translation a magician’s vanishing trick? Is translation traitorous, transcendent? Maybe translation is impossible. But let’s try it anyways! In this graduate seminar, we will read key texts on the history and theory of translating literature, and we sample translations from across the centuries of the “classics,” such as the Bible and Homer. We will consider competing translations into English of significant modern literary works from a variety of languages, possibly including, but not limited to German, Yiddish, French, Hebrew, and Russian. These readings will serve to frame each student’s own semester-long translation of a literary work from a language of her or his choice. The seminar offers graduate students with their skills in various language an opportunity to take on a significant translation project within a circle of peers. Cross listed with COML 519 and JWST 537
                                                                              ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                              GRMN 544-401 PUBLIC ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES WIGGIN, BETHANY W 0200PM-0500PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. In spring 2018, participants have the opportunity to participate in PPEH's public engagement projects on urban waters and environmental data. These ongoing projects document the variety of uses that Philadelphians make of federal climateand environmental data, in and beyond city government; they also shine light onclimate and environmental challenges our city faces and the kinds of data we need to address them. Working with five community partners across Philadelphia, including the City's Office of Sustainability, students in this course will develop data use stories and surface the specific environmental questions neighborhoods have and the kinds of data they find useful. The course hosts guest speakers and research partners from related public engagement projects across the planet; community, neighborhood, open data, and open science advocates; and project partners in government in the City of Philadelphia and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Course assignments include: * 2 short-form essays (course blog posts); * a 12-hour research stay (conducted over multiple visits) with a community course partner to canvas data uses and desires; * authorship of 3 multi-media data stories; * co-organization and participation in a city-wide data storytelling event on May 2, 2018.
                                                                                ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                GRMN 547-401 WRITING IN DARK TIMES RICHTER, SIMON F 0900AM-1200PM The rise of Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 radically disrupted the literary marketplace in Germany. Public book burnings were the most visible sign of a complete reorganization of the literary world. What was it like to be a writer in the Third Reich? How did censorship work? What kind of choices were writers forced to make? What political roles did writers adopt? Under what conditions could they publish? Who read their books and how did they read them? These are some of the questions we will ask as we become acquainted with German writers in ideological adherence or alliance, in exile throughout Europe and the Americas, in "inner emigration," even in concentration camps, and in hiding. By focusing on their writing, we will shed light on the value of literature in dark times.
                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                  GRMN 552-401 KANT II PEREIRA DI SALVO, CARLOS MW 0200PM-0330PM A study of Kant's moral philosophy, political philosophy, and aesthetics, focusing on his Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, Critique of Practical Reason, Metaphysics of Morals, and Critique of Judgement.
                                                                                    ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                    GRMN 562-301 EARLY MODERNISM HAHMANN, ANDREE
                                                                                    FREI, CHRISTINA
                                                                                    W 0400PM-0700PM Topics vary annually.
                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                      GRMN 657-401 BECOMING MODERN WEISSBERG, LILIANE T 0300PM-0500PM Yuri Slezkine described the twentieth century as a "Jewish Age"-to be modern would essentially mean to be a Jew. In German historical and cultural studies, this linkage has long been made--only in reference to the last years of the German monarchy and the time of the Weimar Republic. Indeed, what has become known as "modern" German culture-reflected in literature, music, and the visual arts and in a multitude of public media-has been more often than not assigned to Jewish authorship or Jewish subjects. But what do authorship and subject mean in this case? Do we locate the German-Jewish experience as the driving force of this new "modernity," or is our understanding of this experience the result of this new "modern" world?
                                                                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                        GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP T 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                          GRMN 701-301 PEDAGOGY ROUNDTABLE FREI, CHRISTINA
                                                                                            SCND 104-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills.
                                                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                              SCND 504-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills.
                                                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                YDSH 102-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM In this course, you can continue to develop basic reading, writing and speaking skills. Discover treasures of Yiddish culture: songs, literature, folklore, and films.
                                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                  YDSH 104-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1030AM-1200PM Continuation of YDSH 103. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.
                                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                    YDSH 502-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                      YDSH 504-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1030AM-1200PM Continuation of YDSH 503. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.
                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION