Courses for Spring 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 102-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM Continuation of DTCH 101.
    DTCH 502-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM Continuation of DTCH 501.
      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
      GRMN 101-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
        GRMN 102-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II HACKING, MEREDITH MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
          GRMN 102-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
            GRMN 102-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II DYER, SELENA MWF 0100PM-0200PM
            TR 0130PM-0230PM
            This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
              GRMN 103-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1000AM-1100AM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                GRMN 104-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1100AM-1200PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                  GRMN 104-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                    GRMN 107-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                    TR 1030AM-1200PM
                    This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                      GRMN 151-401 FOREST WORLDS RICHTER, SIMON MWF 0200PM-0300PM Can the humanities help us think differently about the forest? What happens if we imagine forests as the agents of their stories? At a time when humans seem unable to curb the destructive practices that place themselves, biodiversity, and the forests at risk, the humanities give us access to a record of the complex inter-relationship between forests and humanity. The course places a wide range of literature and film in which forests are strongly featured in relation to environmental history and current environmental issues.
                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                        GRMN 156-401 QUEER GERMAN CINEMA FLEISHMAN, IAN TR 1200PM-0130PM Taught in English. This course offers an introduction into the history of German-language cinema with an emphasis on depictions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer themes. The course provides a chronological survey of Queer German Cinema from its beginnings in the Weimar Republic to its most recent and current representatives, accompanied throughout by a discussion of the cultural-political history of gay rights in the German-speaking world. Over the course of the semester, students will learn not only cinematic history but how to write about and close-read film. No knowledge of German or previous knowledge required.
                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                          GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE KAISER, JOHANNA TBA TBA- The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                            GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS JAMES, DAVID MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              GRMN 220-001 Business German: A Micro Perspective JAMES, DAVID TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is designed to enhance your speaking, reading and writing skills, in addition to helping you build a strong foundation in business vocabulary. Course objectives include acquiring skills in cross cultural communication, teamwork, business management, and creating a business plan. German grammar will be covered on a need be basis. This course will prepare you to perform and contribute while in a German-speaking business environment. Taught in German.
                                FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                GRMN 247-401 MARX BIAREISHYK, SIARHEI TR 0430PM-0600PM "A spectre is haunting Europe--the spectre of Communism": This, the famous opening line of The Communist Manifesto, will guide this course's exploration of the history, legacy, and potential future of Karl Marx's most important texts and ideas, even long after Communism has been pronounced dead. Contextualizing Marx within a tradition of radical thought regarding politics, religion, and sexuality, we will focus on the philosophical, political, and cultural origins and implications of his ideas. Our work will center on the question of how his writings seek to counter or exploit various tendencies of the time; how they align with the work of Nietzsche, Freud, and other radical thinkers to follow; and how they might continue to haunt us today. We will begin by discussing key works by Marx himself, examining ways in which he is both influenced by and appeals to many of the same fantasies, desires, and anxieties encoded in the literature, arts and intellectual currents of the time. In examining his legacy, we will focus on elaborations or challenges to his ideas, particularly within cultural criticism, postwar protest movements, and the cultural politics of the Cold War. In conclusion, we will turn to the question of Marxism or Post-Marxism today, asking what promise Marx's ideas might still hold in a world vastly different from his own. All readings and lectures in English.
                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                  GRMN 261-401 JEWISH FILMS & LIT HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 0130PM-0300PM From the 1922 silent film "Hungry Hearts" through the first "talkie," "The JazzSinger," produced in 1927, and beyond "Schindler's List," Jewish characters have confronted the problems of their Jewishness on the silver screen for a general American audience. Alongside this Hollywood tradition of Jewish film, Yiddish film blossomed from independent producers between 1911 and 1939, and interpreted literary masterpieces, from Shakespeare's "King Lear" to Sholom Aleichem's "Teyve the Dairyman," primarily for an immigrant, urban Jewish audience. In this course, we will study a number of films and their literary sources (in fiction and drama), focusing on English language and Yiddish films within the framework of three dilemmas of interpretation: a) the different ways we "read" literature and film, b) the various ways that the media of fiction, drama, and film "translate" Jewish culture, and c) how these translations of Jewish culture affect and are affected by their implied audience. All readings and lectures in English.
                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                    GRMN 264-401 TRANSLATING CULTURES HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 0300PM-0430PM "Languages are not strangers to one another," writes the great critic and translator Walter Benjamin. Yet two people who speak different languages have a difficult time talking to one another, unless they both know a third, common language or can find someone who knows both their languages to translate what they want to say. Without translation, most of us would not be able to read the Bible or Homer, the foundations of Western culture. Americans wouldn't know much about the cultures of Europe, China, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. And people who live in or come from these places would not know much about American culture. Without translation, Americans would not know much about the diversity of cultures within America. The very fabric of our world depend upon translation between people, between cultures, between texts. With a diverse group of readings--autobiography, fiction, poetry, anthrology, and literary theory--this course will address some fundamental questions about translating language and culture. What does it mean to translate? How do we read a text in translation? What does it mean to live between two languages? Who is a translator? What are different kinds of literary and cultural translation? what are their principles and theories? Their assumptions and practices? Their effects on and implications for the individual and the society?
                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                      GRMN 301-001 HANDSCHRIFT-HYPERTEXT FREI, CHRISTINA TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will provide an introduction to German-language literary studies through exemplary readings of short forms: fables, fairy tales, aphorisms, stories, novellas, feuilletons, poems, songs, radio plays, film clips, web projects and others. Paying particular attention to how emergent technology influences genre, we will trace an evolution from Minnesang to rock songs, from early print culture to the internet age and from Handschrift to hypertext. Students will have ample opportunity to improve their spoken and written German through class discussion and a series of internet-based assignments. Readings and discussions in German. Prerequisite: This course will be offered every spring semester. Taught in German.
                                        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                        GRMN 324-001 GRMN IDEAS & NAZI IDEOL HAHMANN, ANDREE TR 0130PM-0300PM Right-wing movements are often considered to be a reservoir of those who are left behind and economic losers. This seems to apply as much today as it did to the fascist movements of the first half of the 20th century. Admittedly, the economic situation has had a considerable influence on the development and success of these movements and most intellectuals have obviously reacted with open rejection to the aggressive and racist policies, which has led to mass emigration, especially to the United States. It must be noted, however, that the movement itself was supported by a prominent conservative worldview from which it emerged and through which it is best understood. The notion of the "Downfall of the West" (Oswald Spengler) or the prevailing view among the intellectual elite that "Germany's soul is the place where Europe's spiritual oppositions are carried out" (Thomas Mann) and the resulting disdain for political business, are all expressions of the idea of a special historical responsibility of the Germans. Even though this intellectual elite was opposed to the National Socialist movement, it must be said that the most renowned thinkers not only arranged themselves with the regime, but even supported it at times. Three particularly important examples are Martin Heidegger, Carl Schmitt and Gottfried Benn. Today they are counted among the intellectual giants of the 20th century and their works are studied worldwide, including the University of Pennsylvania. In this seminar, the spirit of National Socialism will be explored. To this end, we will look at the intellectual background in Europe at the beginning of the 20th century, but especially at the period between the two wars, before we will then intensively deal with the National Socialist involvement of the three thinkers Heidegger, Schmitt, and Benn.
                                          GRMN 403-301 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM FREI, CHRISTINA TBA TBA-
                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                            GRMN 501-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                              GRMN 502-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II HACKING, MEREDITH MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                GRMN 502-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                  GRMN 502-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II DYER, SELENA MWF 0100PM-0200PM
                                                  TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                    GRMN 503-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1000AM-1100AM
                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                      GRMN 504-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                        GRMN 504-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                          GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS JAMES, DAVID MW 0200PM-0330PM
                                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                            GRMN 514-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                            TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; THE SECOND TERM OF A TWO-TERM COURSE
                                                              GRMN 544-401 PUBLIC ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES WIGGIN, BETHANY W 0200PM-0500PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment.
                                                                ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                GRMN 557-301 READING THE 20TH CENTURY FLEISHMAN, IAN W 0200PM-0400PM
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  GRMN 572-401 MATERIALISM BIAREISHYK, SIARHEI R 0130PM-0430PM How do we recognize materialism? This seminar poses this question by acknowledging "materialism" as a contested category with disparate and contradictory historical meanings: as a synonym for dogmatism, as the arch-enemy of reason and morality, as the scientific philosophy of the revolutionary workers' movement, as an alternative to (idealist) metaphysics, as a poetic practice, or as a central concern for material nature and environment, among others. Less concerned with enumerating philosophical systems, we will search out "family resemblances" and materialist tendencies among a wide range of texts. To this end, we will not only read the major historical texts of the so-called materialists (from Lucretius to Spinoza, from La Mettrie to Lenin), but also engage with materialism's supposed critics and antagonists (from Plato to Kant and Hegel). A special emphasis will be placed on the attempts to recuperate materialism as a positive category in recent critical theory and continental philosophy, for example, in the reinventions of Marxist and Spinozist traditions. We will also survey the attempts that found new traditions, such as aleatory materialism or various new materialisms. By reading exemplary literary texts that engage with the problem of materialism the seminar will also ask: can one speak of materialist poetics?
                                                                    ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP RICHTER, SIMON T 0900AM-1030AM GRMN Ph.D. requirement
                                                                      GRMN 701-301 PEDAGOGY ROUNDTABLE FREI, CHRISTINA GRMN Ph.D. requirement
                                                                        SCND 102-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part two of the elementary level Swedish course. Authentic texts and media will be introduced, as well as opportunities to communicate with native speakers. By the end of the spring semester you will be able to handle a range of practical situations, such as ordering in restaurants and cafes, shopping, talking about family, holidays, plans, daily routines, health, sports/hobbies, jobs and studies. You will work on expressing your opinions and intentions, likes and dislikes, and understanding basic authentic source media, spoken language, etc. You will also learn about Sweden in an international context.
                                                                          SCND 502-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part two of the elementary level Swedish course. Authentic texts and media will be introduced, as well as opportunities to communicate with native speakers. By the end of the spring semester you will be able to handle a range of practical situations, such as ordering in restaurants and cafes, shopping, talking about family, holidays, plans, daily routines, health, sports/hobbies, jobs and studies. You will work on expressing your opinions and intentions, likes and dislikes, and understanding basic authentic source media, spoken language, etc. You will also learn about Sweden in an international context.
                                                                            YDSH 102-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM In this course, you can continue to develop basic reading, writing and speaking skills. Discover treasures of Yiddish culture: songs, literature, folklore, and films.
                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                              YDSH 104-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1030AM-1200PM Continuation of YDSH 103. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.
                                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                YDSH 502-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                  YDSH 504-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1030AM-1200PM Continuation of YDSH 503. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.
                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION