Courses for Fall 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 103-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM A third semester Dutch language course. The emphasis lies on vocabulary expansion through the use of audio-taped materials and readings. Grammar is expanded beyond the basics and focuses on compound sentences, features of text coherence and idiomatic language usage.
    DTCH 503-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM A third semester Dutch language course. The emphasis lies on vocabulary expansion through the use of audio-taped materials and readings. Grammar is expanded beyond the basics and focuses on compound sentences, features of text coherence and idiomatic language usage.
      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
      GRMN 026-401 JEWS AND CHINA: VIEWS FROM TWO PERSPECTIVES HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 0130PM-0300PM Jews in China??? Who knew??? The history of the Jews in China, both modern and medieval, is an unexpected and fascinating case of cultural exchange. Even earlier than the 10th century. Jewish trader from India or Persia on the Silk Road, settled in Kaifeng, the capital of the Northern Song Dynasty, and established a Jewish community that lasted through the nineteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century, Jewish merchants, mainly from Iraq, often via India, arrived in China and played a major role in the building of modern Shanghei. After 1898, Jews from Russia settled in the northern Chinese city of Harbin, first as traders and later as refugees from the Bolshevik Revolution and Russian Civil War. In the first decades of the twentieth century, a few Jews from Poland and Russia visited China as tourists, drawn by a combination of curiosity about the cultural exoticism of a truly foreign culture and an affinity that Polish Jewish socialists and communists felt as these political movements began to emerge in China. During World War II, Shanghai served as a port of refuge for Jews from Central Europe. In this freshman seminar, we will explore how these Jewish traders, travelers, and refugees responded to and represented China in their writings. We will also read works by their Chinese contemporaries and others to see the responses to and perceptions of these Jews. We will ask questions about cultural translation: How do exchanges between languages, religions, and cultures affect the identities of individuals and communities? What commonalities and differences between these people emerge?
        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
        GRMN 027-301 Euro Zone Crisis - The EU in a Currency War for Survival? SHIELDS, SUSANNE TR 1030AM-1200PM "Let me put it simply...there may be a contradiction between the interests of the financial world and the interests of the political world...We cannot keep constantly explaining to our voters and our citizens why the taxpayer should bear the cost of certain risks and not those people who have earned a lot of money from taking those risks." Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, at the G20 Summit, November 2010. In January 1999, a single monetary system united Germany, a core nation, with 10 other European states. Amidst the optimism of the euro's first days, most observers forecast that Europe would progress toward an ever closer union. Indeed, in the ensuing decade, the European Union became the world's largest trading area, the euro area expanded to include 17 member states, and the Lisbon Treaty enhanced the efficiency and democratic legitimacy of the Union. In 2009, Greece's debt crisis exposed deep rifts within the European Union and developed into a euro zone crisis - arguably the most difficult test Europe has faced in the past 60 years. After two years of a more benign EURO debt situation, the risk of recession, EU sanctions agains Russia, and a possible collision of a newly-elected Greek government with its creditors, the euro crisis returned with a vengeance in 2015. In addition, the pressure mounts for European leaders to find a solution to the refugee crisis which reached a peak in the fall of 2015. In 2016 the Brexit delivered the latest blow to the European Union, and the future of the European project without the UK looks bleak. The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is still fragile, and economic and political developments in 2017 could determine the future of the euro. Does the EU have what it takes to emerge from these crises? Will the European nations find a collective constructive solution that will lead to a fiscal union that implies further integration?
          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
          GRMN 101-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I NORTON, BRYAN MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
            GRMN 101-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I MENDEZ, ALEXA MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
              GRMN 101-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I SAX, ADAM MWF 0100PM-0200PM
              TR 0130PM-0230PM
              Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                GRMN 101-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I MCKINLEY, LUSI MW 0600PM-0800PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                  GRMN 102-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                    GRMN 102-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                      GRMN 103-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1100AM-1200PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                        GRMN 103-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1200PM-0100PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                          GRMN 103-403 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0100PM-0200PM
                          TR 0130PM-0230PM
                          This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                            GRMN 104-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II CANCELED A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                              GRMN 104-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II FREI, CHRISTINA MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                GRMN 106-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                                TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. An intensive two credit course in which two semesters of elementary German (GRMN 101 & 102) are completed in one. Introduction to the basic elements of spoken and written German, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of communication skills. Readings and discussions focus on cultural differences. Expression and comprehension are then expanded through the study of literature and social themes.
                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                  GRMN 107-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                  TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                  This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                    GRMN 136-401 NAZI GERMANY & HOLOCAUST RODGERS, JENNIFER TR 0300PM-0430PM
                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                      GRMN 152-401 LIQUID HISTORIES AND FLOATING ARCHIVES WIGGIN, BETHANY TR 1030AM-1200PM Climate change transforms the natural and built environments, and it is re-shaping how we understand, make sense, and care for our past. Climate changes history. This course explores the Anthropocene, the age when humans are remaking earth's systems, from an on-water perspective. In on-line dialogue and video conferences with research teams in port cities on four continents, this undergraduate course focuses on Philadelphia as one case study of how rising waters are transfiguring urban history, as well as its present and future. Students projects take them into the archives at the Independence Seaport Museum and at Bartram's Garden. Field trips by boat on the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers and on land to the Port of Philadelphia and to the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge invite transhistorical dialogues about how colonial and then industrial-era energy and port infrastructure transformed the region's vast tidal marshlands wetlands. Excursions also help document how extreme rain events, storms, and rising waters are re-making the built environment, redrawing lines that had demarcated land from water. In dialogue with one another and invited guest artists, writers, and landscape architects, students final projects consider how our waters might themselves be read and investigated as archives. What do rising seas subsume and hold? Whose stories do they tell? What floats to the surface?
                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                        GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE BRIE, EVELYNE TBA TBA- The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                                          CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                          GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA MWF 1000AM-1100AM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                            GRMN 219-001 GERMAN BUSINESS WORLD: A Macro Perspective JAMES, DAVID MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course offers you insights into the dynamics of Business German, while taking a macro approach. Examples of various course topics include: economic geography and its diversity, the changing role of the Eruopean Union, and the economic importance of national transportation and tourism. In addition, the course emphasizes the development of students' discourse competencies, Business German vocabulary and grammar. Course assignments include oral presentations on current events, class discussions, role-play, and collaborative group work. Class time will be utilized to practice speaking, answering questions, reviewing exercises and holding group discussions on various topics. Class participation is a key component of this course.
                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                              GRMN 255-401 TPCS IN CONTINENTAL PHIL: HEIDEGGER:BEING & TIME HAHMANN, ANDREE TR 0300PM-0430PM Topic for Fall 2018: Heidegger. Martin Heidegger is counted among the most controversial thinkers of the 20th century. He is best known, however, for his early book "Being and Time". This unfinished project was supposed to be completed by several works on major figures of Western philosophy, one of which is Kant. In fact, only shortly after Being and Time, Heigegger published his first book on Kant: Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics. With this book Heidegger's so called metaphysical phase (which lasted at least until the mid 1930's) was initiated. In this course, we will read and discuss not only large parts of Being and Time but also a selection of these later works that are primarily concerned with the nature and object of Metaphysics.
                                                GRMN 258-401 GERMAN CINEMA FLEISHMAN, IAN TR 1200PM-0130PM An introduction to the momentous history of German film, from its beginnings before World War One to developments following the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and German reunification in 1990. With an eye to film's place in its historical and political context, the course will explore the "Golden Age" of German cinema in the Weimar Republic, when Berlin vied with Hollywood; the complex relationship between Nazi ideology and entertainment during the Third Reich; the fate of German film-makers in exile during the Hitler years; post-war film production in both West and East Germany; the call for an alternative to "Papa's Kino" and the rise of New German Cinema in the 1960s.
                                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                                                  GRMN 302-001 PLACES OF MEMORY WEISSBERG, LILIANE TR 1030AM-1200PM What is culture? What is German? Where are the borders between German, Austrian and Swiss culture? What is part of the "cultural canon"? Who decides and what role does memory play? Relying on the theory of collective memory (Halbwachs) and the concept of "places of memory" (Erinnerungsorte; Nora, Francois/Schulze) and with reference to examplary scholarly and literary texts, debates, songs, films, documents, and paintings from high and pop culture, this course will weave a mosaic of that which (also) constitutes German or German-language culture.
                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                    GRMN 311-001 KRAUTROCK & DIE FOLGEN LEWIS, JEHNNA
                                                    HAHMANN, ANDREE
                                                    TR 0430PM-0600PM
                                                      GRMN 401-001 TRANS(L)ITS RICHTER, SIMON TR 0130PM-0300PM Drawing on Goethe's musings on "world literature", the course focuses on authors who have arrived at their German words via global, worldly itineraries. The course considers movements between languages, including those of the students themselves and encourages students to develop their own voice as authors via a series of critical and creative writing exercise. At the same time, students develop strategies to reflect on their own language learning. This course provides an important space for German-learners at Penn to draw on one another's experiences in the program and to build a sense of community. The course is required for all German majors in the Fall semester of their senior year.
                                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                        GRMN 501-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I NORTON, BRYAN MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                          GRMN 501-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I MENDEZ, ALEXA MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                            GRMN 501-403 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I SAX, ADAM MWF 0100PM-0200PM
                                                            TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                              GRMN 502-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                GRMN 502-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                  GRMN 503-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MTWR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                    GRMN 503-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                      GRMN 503-403 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0100PM-0200PM
                                                                      TR 0130PM-0230PM
                                                                        GRMN 504-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II CANCELED
                                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                          GRMN 504-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II FREI, CHRISTINA MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                            GRMN 505-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 0900AM-1000AM
                                                                            TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                              GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                GRMN 514-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                                TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                  GRMN 529-401 SEMINAR IN THEORY: AURALITY AND DECONSTRUCTION FLEISHMAN, IAN
                                                                                  WALTHAM-SMITH, NAOMI
                                                                                  W 0200PM-0500PM
                                                                                    ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                    GRMN 534-401 HISTORY LIT THEORY RABATE, JEAN-MICHEL W 0900AM-1200PM Over the last three decades, the fields of literary and cultural studies have been reconfigured by a variety of theoretical and methodological developments. Bracing-and-often confrontational-dialogues between theoretical and political positions as varied as Deconstruction. New Historicism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Queer Theory, Minority Discourse Theory, Colonial and Post-colonial Studies and Cultural Studies have, in particular, altered disciplinary agendas and intellectual priorities for students embarking on the /professional / study of literature. In this course, we will study key texts, statements and debates that define these issues, and will work towards a broad knowledge of the complex rewriting of the project of literary studies in process today. The readiing list will keep in mind the Examination List in Comparative Literature. We will not work towards complete coverage but will ask how crucial contemporary theorists engage with the longer history and institutional practices of literary criticism. There will be no examinations. Students will make one class presentation, which will then be reworked into a paper (1200-1500 words) to be submitted one week after the presentation. A second paper will be an annotated bibliography on a theoretical issue or issues that a student wishes to explore further. The bibliography will be developed in consultation with the instructor; it will typically include three or four books and six to eight articles or their equivalent. The annotated bibliography will be prefaced by a five or six page introduction; the whole will add up to between 5000 and 6000 words of prose. Students will prepare "position notes" each week, which will either be posted on a weblog or circulated in class.
                                                                                      ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                      GRMN 535-401 THE ELEMENTAL TURN RICHTER, SIMON R 0600PM-0800PM The unfolding effects of climate change--rising sea level, melting ice sheets, subsiding land masses, drought stricken regions, wild fires, air laden with greenhouse gases, and inundated cities--heighen our awareness of the elements: air, earth, fire and water. Within the context of the new materialism, philosophers, eco-critics, and writers are re-turning to the elements and encountering, at the same time, predecessor texts that assume new relevance. This seminar will place current thinking and writing about the elements into dialogue with older traditions ranging from the classical (Empedocles, Plato, Lucretius) to writers and thinkers of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries (e.g., Goethe, Novalis, Tieck, Stifter, Bachelard, Heidegger, Boehme).
                                                                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                        GRMN 551-401 KANT I: CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON HORSTMANN, ROLF R 0300PM-0600PM The course will concentrate on the Critique of Pure Reason and discuss in detail Kant's conception of knowledge and experience, his criticism of traditional metaphysics and the resulting project of a system of transcendental philosophy. The course will concentrate on the Critique of Pure Reason and discuss in detail Kant's conception of knowledge and experience, his criticism of traditional metaphysics and the resulting project of a system of transcendental philosophy.
                                                                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                          GRMN 558-301 THE LONG 19TH CENTURY WEISSBERG, LILIANE T 0300PM-0500PM
                                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                            GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP T 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                              SCND 103-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM In part one of the intermediate year, students will research and explore a broad range of topics using authentic sources and course materials to gain greater fluency and familiarity with language and culture. You will meet native Swedish speakers and visit Swedish organizations in the Philadelphia area. Projects and assignments will give you ample opportunity to explore areas that are of special interest to you from academic, professional, and personal perspectives. We will learn about Swedish innovation, business, socio-economic and political structures, geography, tourism, migration, history, and about what it is like to live in Sweden today.
                                                                                                SCND 503-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM In part one of the intermediate year, students will research and explore a broad range of topics using authentic sources and course materials to gain greater fluency and familiarity with language and culture. You will meet native Swedish speakers and visit Swedish organizations in the Philadelphia area. Projects and assignments will give you ample opportunity to explore areas that are of special interest to you from academic, professional, and personal perspectives. We will learn about Swedish innovation, business, socio-economic and political structures, geography, tourism, migration, history, and about what it is like to live in Sweden today.
                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                  YDSH 101-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                    YDSH 103-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 1030AM-1200PM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                      YDSH 501-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                        YDSH 503-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN TR 1030AM-1200PM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE