Courses for Spring 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
GSWS 002-601 GENDER & SOCIETY MURPHY, MARIA T 0600PM-0900PM This course will introduce students to the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality mark our bodies, influence our perceptions of self and others, organize families and work like, delimit opportunities for individuals and groups of people, as well as impact the terms of local and transnational economic exchange. We will explore the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality work with other markers of difference and social status such as race, age, nationality, and ability to further demarcate possibilities, freedoms, choices, and opportunities available to people.
    Society sector (all classes) CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; SOCIETY SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
    GSWS 003-001 INTRO TO QUEER STUDIES KATZ, JONATHAN CANCELED This course will introduce students to the historical and intellectual forces that led to the emergence of queer theory as a distinct field, as well as to recent and ongoing debates about gender, sexuality, embodiment, race, privacy, global power, and social norms. We will begin by tracing queer theory's conceptual heritage and prehistory in psychoanalysis, deconstruction and poststructuralism, the history of sexuality, gay and lesbian studies, woman-of-color feminism, the feminist sex wars, and the AIDS crisis. We will then study the key terms and concepts of the foundational queer work of the 1990s and early 2000s. Finally, we will turn to the new questions and issues that queer theory has addressed in roughly the past decade. Students will write several short papers.
      GSWS 003-401 INTRO TO QUEER STUDIES KATZ, JONATHAN TR 0300PM-0430PM This course will introduce students to the historical and intellectual forces that led to the emergence of queer theory as a distinct field, as well as to recent and ongoing debates about gender, sexuality, embodiment, race, privacy, global power, and social norms. We will begin by tracing queer theory's conceptual heritage and prehistory in psychoanalysis, deconstruction and poststructuralism, the history of sexuality, gay and lesbian studies, woman-of-color feminism, the feminist sex wars, and the AIDS crisis. We will then study the key terms and concepts of the foundational queer work of the 1990s and early 2000s. Finally, we will turn to the new questions and issues that queer theory has addressed in roughly the past decade. Students will write several short papers.
        GSWS 004-401 THE FAMILY GONALONS-PONS, PILAR MW 0200PM-0330PM Historical and cultural development of the family, analysis of sexual codes; discussion of role difference between men and women; factors involved in mate selection and marital adjustment; analysis of family disorganization with both individual and societal implications.
          Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
          GSWS 006-401 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOS HUMPHREYS, JUSTIN TR 1200PM-0100PM This course is an introduction to a few central themes in philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries, and to some of the crucial thinkers who addressed those themes. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the nature of the human being (including the human mind), the relationship between God and the created world, the nature of freedom, and the relations among natural sciences, philosophy and theology in this rich period of human history.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
            GSWS 101-401 JANE AUSTEN AND ADAPTATION GAMER, MICHAEL MW 1000AM-1100AM This is an introduction to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but some versions of this course will feature other writers. (For offerings in a given semester, please see the on-line course descriptions on the English Department website.) We will read several works and approach them--both in discussion and in writing--from a range of critical perspectives. The author's relation to his or her time, to literary history generally, and to the problems of performance, are likely to be emphasized. This course is designed for the General Requirement; it is also intended to serve as a first or second course for prospective English majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
              GSWS 103-401 SEX & HUMAN NATURE SCHURR, THEODORE TR 1200PM-0130PM This is an introduction to the scientific study of sex in humans. Within an evolutionary framework, the course examines genetic, physiological, ecological, social and behavioral aspects of sex in humans. After providing the basic principles of evolutionary biology, the course will examine the development of sexual anatomy and physiology. How is sex determined? How is orgasm achieved? Why do girls and boys develop sexually at different ages? The role of ecology and social life in shaping human mating patterns will be evaluated through the use of ethnographies and cross-cultural materials on a variety of human cultures. Does everybody have sex the way we do? Why marry? Are there biological bases for love? Why do we experience jealousy? Fianlly, topics relevant to human sexuality today will be discussed, such as recreational sex, contraception, and sexually transmitted diseases. Examples are drawn primarily from traditional and modern human societies; data from studies of nonhuman primates are also considered.
                Living World Sector (all classes) LIVING WORLD SECTOR
                GSWS 118-401 IRAN CINEMA:GEND/POL/REL ENTEZARI, MAHYAR TR 0300PM-0430PM This seminar explores Iranian culture, society, history and politics through the medium of film. We will examine a variety of cinematic works that represent the social, political, economic and cultural circumstances of contemporary Iran, as well as the diaspora. Along the way, we will discuss issues pertaining to gender, religion, nationalism, ethnicity, and the role of cinema in Iranian society and beyond. Discussions topics will also include the place of the Iranian diaspora in cinema, as well as the transnational production, distribution, and consumption of Iranian cinema. Films will include those by internationally acclaimed filmmakers, such as Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Asghar Farhadi, Bahman Ghobadi, Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Dariush Mehrjui, Tahmineh Milani, Jafar Panahi, Marjane Satrapi and others. All films will be subtitled in English. No prior knowledge is required.
                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  GSWS 128-601 THE DIARY BEN-AMOS, BATSHEVA W 0530PM-0830PM Diary writing is an intimate mode of expression in which individuals seek to find meaning in their personal lives and relations, responding to the external realities in which they live. Their coping is subjected to their historical,educational and social contexts, and to the generic conventions of diary writing. This course examines the diary as a genre, exploring its functions, meanings, forms and conventions, comparing it with fictive and non-fictive autobiographical writings such as the diary novel, autobiography and the memoir, as well as comparative gender diary-writing.
                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    GSWS 135-601 Being Human: A Personal Approach to Race, Class & Gender WATTERSON, KATHRYN T 0530PM-0830PM A workshop course in the writing of expository prose. Assignments include informal as well as formal essays, covering such topics as autobiography, family history, review, interview, analysis of advertising and popular culture, travel, work, and satire. ENGL-135 is the primary for this course, and will be cross-listed with GSWS when the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings
                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                      GSWS 165-401 FORGOTTEN ASIANS OF THE AMERICAS PILLAI, RUPA MW 0200PM-0330PM Although Asians have lived in the Americas for centuries, the Asian American community and experience tends to be defined by the post-1965 wave of immigration to the United States. In an effort to correct this narrative this course will explore the histories, experiences, and contributions of some of the forgotten Asians of the Americas. In particular, we will focus on the earlier labor migrations of Chinese and South Asian individuals to the Caribbean and the United States. The experiences of these individuals, who built railroads, cut sugarcane, and replaced African slave labor, complicate our understandings of race today. By examining the legal and social debates surrounding their labor in the 19th century and exploring how their experiences are forgotten and their descendants are rendered invisible today, we will complicate what is Asian America and consider how this history shapes immigration policies today.
                        GSWS 215-401 ASIAN AM GENDERSEXUALITY: ASIAN AMERICAN GENDER AND SEXUALITY PILLAI, RUPA TR 1030AM-1200PM This course explores the intersection of gender, sexuality, and race in Asian America. Through interdisciplinary and cultural texts, students will consider how Asian American gender and sexualities are constructed in relation to racism while learning theories on and methods to study gender, sex, and race. We will discuss masculinities, femininities, race-conscious feminisms, LGBTQ+ identities, interracial and intraracial relationships, and kinship structures.
                          GSWS 222-601 African Women Lives Past/Present BLAKELY, PAMELA T 0430PM-0730PM Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.
                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            GSWS 226-401 DISORDERLY WOMEN IN RENAISSANCE DRAMA LOOMBA, ANIA R 0130PM-0430PM This course explores an aspect of drama before 1660 intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                              GSWS 234-401 GENDER & RELIG IN CHINA CHENG, HSIAO-WEN R 0430PM-0730PM This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.
                                GSWS 244-401 THE AMERICAN WOMEN'S MOVEMENT AND LGBT LIBERATION, 1960S-1980S PEISS, KATHY T 0130PM-0430PM This seminar explores the history of the feminist and LGBT movements from the mid-1960s to mid-1980s in Philadelphia. Although there will be some attention to national organizations, we will focus on social and political activism as it was made in local groups and spaces. We will explore the social and cultural web that fostered activism, for example, in gay and lesbian coffee houses, campus women's centers, bookstores, and radio shows. We will also pay attention to groups and actions that may not have been self-consciously defined as "feminist" or "gay liberationist," but had important effects on social change related to gender and sexuality; these include African American, Latino/a, and working-class organizations. This is a hands-on research seminar, with students exploring local archives and special collections to document and analyze these complex movements. Each student will conduct an oral history, analyze a set of published and printed sources, and write a paper based on archival research.
                                  GSWS 252-401 FREUD WEISSBERG, LILIANE TR 1030AM-1200PM No other person of the twentieth century has probably influenced scientific thought, humanistic scholarship, medical therapy, and popular culture as much as Sigmund Freud. This course will study his work, its cultural background, and its impact on us today. In the first part of the course, we will learn about Freud's life and the Viennese culture of his time. We will then move to a discussion of seminal texts, such as excerpts from his Interpretation of Dreams, case studies, as well as essays on psychoanalytic practice, human development, definitions of gender and sex, neuroses, and culture in general. In the final part of the course, we will discuss the impact of Freud's work. Guest lectureres from the medical field, history of science, psychology, and the humnities will offer insights into the reception of Freud's work, and its consequences for various fields of study and therapy.
                                    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                    GSWS 257-401 CONTEMPOR FICT/FILM-JPAN KANO, AYAKO F 0200PM-0500PM This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, mangazines, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi.
                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                      GSWS 258-401 WOMEN IN THE BIBLE CRANZ, ISABEL TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                        GSWS 277-401 GENDER, SEX & URBAN LIFE KNITTLE, DAVIS TR 1200PM-0120PM Is urban space gendered? Do we change how it is gendered as we move through it? Does it change us? This course explores gender and sexuality in the contemporary global city through the study of urban spaces. We will consider feminist, queer, and transgender theories of the city, as we investigate how practices of using and making space are gendered and sexualized. Each week of the course will be organized around a type of space, including subway, school, and birthing center, nightclub, suburb, and park. Assignments will include an auto-ethnography, a short critical essay, and a final assignment that asks you to propose an additional type of space in which to study the intersections of sex, gender, and the urban built environment. In each space, we will conduct an interdisciplinary exploration, drawing from sociology, anthropology, geography, city planning history, feminist and queer theory, as well as from fiction, poetry, music videos, photography, and documentary film.
                                          GSWS 279-401 PROVOCATIVE PERFORMANCE MALAGUE, ROSEMARY TR 0300PM-0430PM What is feminist theatre? How do artists use live performance to provoke not only thought and feeling, but also social, personal, and political change? This course will examine a wide array of plays and performances by and about women; these pieces are, in turn, serious, hilarious, outrageous, poignant--and always provocative. Our focus will be on English-language works from the late 20th century to the present (#metoo) moment. We will read these performance texts and/or view them on stage/screen; we will also read essays that provide contextual background on feminist theatre theory and history. Throughout the semester, we will engage diverse perspectives on women and race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and gender identity; the issues we encounter will also include marriage and motherhood, career and community, feminism and friendship, and patriarchy and power. The class will take full advantage of any related events occurring on campus or in the city, and will feature visits with guest speakers. Students will have the opportunity to pursue research on their own areas of interest (some recent examples are "women in comedy," trans performance, drag kings, feminist directing, etc.).
                                            GSWS 290-401 SEX, DRUGS, AND CRIME: GENDER RELATIONS IN BALLET IN THE 19TH CENTURY KANT, MARION T 0130PM-0430PM The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.
                                              GSWS 294-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                                                SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                GSWS 295-401 CINEMA AND MEDIA: GLOBAL FILM THEORY REDROBE, KAREN
                                                MAZAJ, META
                                                TR 1030AM-1130AM This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be a weekly film screening for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mid-term; 1 final project.
                                                  SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                  GSWS 322-401 GLOBAL TRANS* FIERECK, KIRK CANCELED This is an advanced topics course, and the course description will vary from semester to semester.
                                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                    GSWS 333-401 GLOBAL TRANS* FIERECK, KIRK W 0200PM-0500PM How do prevailing economic and political ideologies influence trans* experiences and theories of gender and sexuality? This course will examine this question from disciplinary perspectives across the social sciences and humanities. The main theme students will explore is that, as social relations, transgender identities or trans*ness as well as sex, gender and sexuality are produced through the interplay of individual desires and bodies with social norms. Just as sex and sexuality are not natural, unchanging entities or deep, inner essences of self or personhood, trans*ness is radically different where- and whenever it emerges across human societies. The course will survey theoretical and practical discussions over the implications of envisioning both trans*ness as both radical and normative; as sites for progressive politics as well as reinforcing oppressive social relations. Students will engage with a dimensional perspective, in lieu of the secret ethnocentrisms of "intersectionality". Dimensionality makes visible markers of social difference, such as class, and nation as well as economic forces, that intersectionality ignores, and which change the many natures of global trans*ness.
                                                      GSWS 334-401 FEMINIST ETHNOGRAPHY THOMAS, DEBORAH M 0330PM-0630PM This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.
                                                        GSWS 344-401 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL GROWTH ZAMEL, PAMELA T 0500PM-0800PM Intellectual, emotional and behavioral development in the college years. Illustrative topics: developing intellectual and social competence; developing personal and career goals; managing interpersonal relationships; values and behavior. Recommended for submatriculation in Psychological Services Master's Degree program.
                                                          GSWS 346-401 BODIES, RACE AND RIGHTS: SEX AND CITIZENSHIP IN MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY BROWN, KATHLEEN MW 1200PM-0100PM What did it mean to be a man or woman in the post-Civil War United States? Was being a man the same as being a citizen? If African-American men were to be fully embraced as both men and citizens in the aftermath of slavery, where did that leave women, white and black? Why did a nation built on immigration become so hostile to certain groups of immigrants during this period? In this course, we consider how the meanings and experiences of womanhood, manhood, citizenship, and equality before the law changed from the period immediately after the Civil War until the present day. We look at political battles over the meaning of citizenship, the use of terror to subdue African Americans politically and economically, and the fears of white Americans that they would lose their political and economic dominance to immigrant groups they deemed irreconcilably different from themselves. We also consider the repercussions of these conflicts for medical, legal, and economic efforts to regulate the bodies of women, children, poor people, immigrants, working class laborers, military men, and African Americans. Throughout the course, we will follow the state's changing use of racial, sexual, and economic categories to assess the bodily and intellectual capacities of different groups of citizens. We will also note some of the popular cultural expressions of manhood, womanhood, and citizenship. The lectures and reading assignments are organized around a series of historical problems, dynamic leaders, and controversies that illuminate these issues.
                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                            GSWS 423-640 Gendered Constructions of Other Cultures in Western Travel Literature RABBERMAN, KRISTINE M 0630PM-0830PM Descriptions of peoples from foreign lands and faraway places have captured theimaginations of Europeans for centuries. Pilgrims and merchants, explorers and conquistadores, Victorians taking their Grand Tour and 21st century travelers have preserved their observations, both in written form, in ethnographies and diaries, novels and travel narratives, and in visual form, in maps, illuminated manuscripts, engravings, and photographs. Through these media, these travelers have not simply captured their memories, but have also helped to shape Western representations of the people they encountered. In the process, these travelers often have justified Western political, economic, cultural, and social dominance, although instead some travelers have critiqued the West. And in all these depictions, gender and sexuality have played centrol roles in the creation of these identities and relationship.
                                                              ONLINE COURSE FEE $150; ONLINE COURSE ONLY
                                                              GSWS 492-640 MORE HUMAN THAN HUMAN SADASHIGE, JACQUELINE R 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                ONLINE COURSE FEE $150; ONLINE COURSE ONLY
                                                                GSWS 517-401 WORK AND IDENTITY LEIDNER, ROBIN W 0330PM-0630PM The thinkers whose work formed the foundations of sociological theory considered the nature of the relationship between work and identity key to understanding social solidarity, power, and historical change. In recent years, the division of labor, structures of work, and employment relations have all been undergoing rapid change, necessarily affecting the possibilities for constructing identity through work. This seminar examines how changes in the nature and organization of work have reshaped the relationshop between work and identity.
                                                                  GSWS 518-401 NURSING&GENDERING OF HEALTH CARE IN THE U.S. AND INTERNATIONALLY, 1860-2000 CONNOLLY, CYNTHIA W 0400PM-0700PM This course examines changing ideas about the nature of health and illness; changing forms of health care delivery; changing experiences of women as providers and patients; changing role expectations and realities for nurses; changing midwifery practice; and changing segmentation of the health care labor market by gender, class and race. It takes a gender perspective on all topics considered in the course. A comparative approach is used as national and international literature is considered. This focus is presented as one way of understanding the complex interrelationships among gender, class, and race in health care systems of the United States and countries abroad.
                                                                    GSWS 555-401 WOMEN AND INCARCERATION BROWN, KATHLEEN W 0500PM-0800PM This elective course will afford students the opportunity to develop and implement health education workshops for incarcerated women in the Philadelphiajail system. Students will explore the social and historical framework and trends in the incarceration of women, as well as the needs of this population, and will identify specific areas that need to be addressed by particular disciplines or professions. Students will have direct contact with the jail system, its staff, and female inmates.
                                                                      AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                                                      GSWS 581-401 ADV PSYCOLOGY OF WOMEN FEGLEY, SUZANNE R 0200PM-0400PM A critical analysis of psychological theories about women and sex differences, a thorough examination of "psychology of women" research articles, and class-initiated research. Among the issues to be covered are: sex role socialization; class, race and gender connections; women and work; employment discrimination, assertiveness training; women's responses to injustice: domestic violence, rape, discrimination; the family and the "new right"; perceptions of women; sexuality, disability and objectification; reproductive rights, sex roles, androgyny and new role prescriptions; mental health and aging.
                                                                        GSWS 582-401 GENDER,POWER&FEM THEORY HIRSCHMANN, NANCY M 0200PM-0500PM
                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                          GSWS 589-401 REC ISSUE IN CRIT THEORY: FEMINIST THEORY NOW SANCHEZ, MELISSA M 1200PM-0300PM This course is a critical exploration of recent literary and cultural theory, usually focusing on one particular movement or school, such as phenomenology, psychoanalysis, the Frankfurt School, or deconstruction.
                                                                            GSWS 612-401 INTERACTIONAL PROCESSES WITH LGBT INDIVIDUALS CROSS, ERIN CANCELED In the past quarter century, the awareness of the unique issues facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals has expanded and become essential knowledge in our work as educators, providers of psychological services, and other service provision fields. This course provides a contextual and applied understanding the interactional processes facing LGBT individuals.
                                                                              GSWS 630-401 GENDER & RELIG IN CHINA CHENG, HSIAO-WEN R 0430PM-0730PM This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.
                                                                                GSWS 634-401 FEMINIST ETHNOGRAPHY THOMAS, DEBORAH M 0330PM-0630PM This course will investigate the relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of research interest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work on gender and sex by anthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and political economy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will critically read contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigate what it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processes through a gendered lens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.
                                                                                  GSWS 790-401 REC ISSUES IN CRIT THEOR: QUEER METHOD LOVE, HEATHER M 0600PM-0900PM The primary for this course is the English Department. When the course content includes gender, sexuality and women's studies it will be cross-listed with GSWS. See additional information and description on the English Department's website: https://www.english.upenn.edu See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.
                                                                                    GSWS 830-401 CONDUCTING RESEARCH IN GLOBAL WOMEN'S HEALTH TEITELMAN, ANNE CANCELED The course focuses on critical examination of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to research on women and girls conducted around the world across disciplines. A focused and intensive exploration of place as it pertains to women and girls in formal and informal structures of health care delivery as those needing and/or seeking health care, and as those roviding health care to others. We will examine multiple dimensions and qualities of these endeavors (e.g. activity, power, control, visibility, value, and remuneration) and the intersection of gender and health - locally, globally and across borders. We will focus our examination on the implications of seeking and providing health care for women's and girls' health and well-being. By examining issues in local and global contexts and across geographical boundaries, we will have the opportunity to challenge gendered, class, political, and cultural assumptions related to women's health. Invited guest speakers will highlight examples of research in global women's health representing multiple disciplinary perspectives.
                                                                                      AUDITORS NEED PERMISSION; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR