Courses for Spring 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
GSWS 002-601 GENDER & SOCIETY KAKU, ARCHANA
MURPHY, KIANA
T 0430PM-0730PM This course will introduce students to the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality mark our bodies, influence our perceptions of self and others, organize families and work like, delimit opportunities for individuals and groups of people, as well as impact the terms of local and transnational economic exchange. We will explore the ways in which sex, gender, and sexuality work with other markers of difference and social status such as race, age, nationality, and ability to further demarcate possibilities, freedoms, choices, and opportunities available to people. Prerequisite: Requirement for Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies major
    Society sector (all classes) CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; SOCIETY SECTOR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
    GSWS 003-401 INTRO TO QUEER STUDIES KATZ, JONATHAN TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will introduce students to the historical and intellectual forces that led to the emergence of queer theory as a distinct field, as well as to recent and ongoing debates about gender, sexuality, embodiment, race, privacy, global power, and social norms. We will begin by tracing queer theory's conceptual heritage and prehistory in psychoanalysis, deconstruction and poststructuralism, the history of sexuality, gay and lesbian studies, woman-of-color feminism, the feminist sex wars, and the AIDS crisis. We will then study the key terms and concepts of the foundational queer work of the 1990s and early 2000s. Finally, we will turn to the new questions and issues that queer theory has addressed in roughly the past decade. Students will write several short papers.
      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
      GSWS 004-401 THE FAMILY GONALONS-PONS, PILAR MW 0200PM-0330PM Historical and cultural development of the family, analysis of sexual codes; discussion of role difference between men and women; factors involved in mate selection and marital adjustment; analysis of family disorganization with both individual and societal implications.
        Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
        GSWS 006-401 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOS DETLEFSEN, KAREN MW 1100AM-1200PM This course is an introduction to a few central themes in philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries, and to some of the crucial thinkers who addressed those themes. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the nature of the human being (including the human mind), the relationship between God and the created world, the nature of freedom, and the relations among natural sciences, philosophy and theology in this rich period of human history.
          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
          GSWS 090-401 GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND LITERATURE: QUEER AUTOBIOGRAPHY CAVITCH, MAX MW 0200PM-0330PM This course will focus on questions of gender difference and of sexual desire in a range of literary works, paying special attention to works by women and treatments of same-sex desire. More fundamentally, the course will introduce students to questions about the relation between identity and representation. We will attend in particular to intersections between gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation, and will choose from a rich vein of authors: Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, the Brontes, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, Radclyffe Hall, Willa Cather, Elizabeth Bishop, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, Sylvia Plath, Bessie Head, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Cherrie Moraga, Toni Morrison, Michael Cunningham, Dorothy Allison, Jeanette Winterson, and Leslie Feinberg. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.
            GSWS 096-401 THEORIES GENDR/SEXUALITY: INTRODUCTION TO FEMINIST, QUEER, AND TRANS THEORY SANCHEZ, MELISSA TR 0300PM-0430PM What makes men and women different? What is the nature of desire? This course introduces students to a long history of speculation about the meaning and nature of gender and sexuality -- a history fundamental to literary representation and the business of making meaning. We will consider theories from Aristophanes speech in Platos Symposium to recent feminist and queer theory. Authors treated might include: Plato, Shakespeare, J. S. Mill, Mary Wollstonecraft, Sigmund Freud, Virginia Woolf, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Michel Foucault, Gayle Rubin, Catherine MacKinnon, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, bell hooks, Leo Bersani, Gloria Anzaldua, David Halperin, Cherrie Moraga, Donna Haraway, Gayatri Spivak, Diana Fuss, Rosemary Hennesy, Chandra Tadpole Mohanty, and Susan Stryker. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
              Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
              GSWS 101-401 STUDY OF AN AUTHOR: TONI MORRISON BEAVERS, HERMAN TR 1030AM-1200PM This is an introduction to literary study through the works of a single author--often Shakespeare, but some versions of this course will feature other writers. (For offerings in a given semester, please see the on-line course descriptions on the English Department website.) We will read several works and approach them--both in discussion and in writing--from a range of critical perspectives. The author's relation to his or her time, to literary history generally, and to the problems of performance, are likely to be emphasized. This course is designed for the General Requirement; it is also intended to serve as a first or second course for prospective English majors. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a complete description of the current offerings.
                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                GSWS 118-401 IRAN CINEMA:GEND/POL/REL ENTEZARI, MAHYAR TR 0300PM-0430PM This seminar explores Iranian culture, society, history and politics through the medium of film. We will examine a variety of cinematic works that represent the social, political, economic and cultural circumstances of contemporary Iran, as well as the diaspora. Along the way, we will discuss issues pertaining to gender, religion, nationalism, ethnicity, and the role of cinema in Iranian society and beyond. Discussions topics will also include the place of the Iranian diaspora in cinema, as well as the transnational production, distribution, and consumption of Iranian cinema. Films will include those by internationally acclaimed filmmakers, such as Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Asghar Farhadi, Bahman Ghobadi, Abbas Kiarostami, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Dariush Mehrjui, Tahmineh Milani, Jafar Panahi, Marjane Satrapi and others. All films will be subtitled in English. No prior knowledge is required.
                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  GSWS 156-401 QUEER GERMAN CINEMA FLEISHMAN, IAN TR 1200PM-0130PM Taught in English. This course offers an introduction into the history of German-language cinema with an emphasis on depictions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer themes. The course provides a chronological survey of Queer German Cinema from its beginnings in the Weimar Republic to its most recent and current representatives, accompanied throughout by a discussion of the cultural-political history of gay rights in the German-speaking world. Over the course of the semester, students will learn not only cinematic history but how to write about and close-read film. No knowledge of German or previous knowledge required.
                    GSWS 165-401 THE ASIAN CARIBBEAN PILLAI, RUPA TR 0300PM-0430PM This course complicates prevailing understandings of the Caribbean and extends the boundaries of Asian America by exploring the histories, experiences, and contributions of Asians in the Caribbean. In particular, we will focus on the migrations of Chinese and Indian individuals to Cuba, Trinidad, and Guyana as well as how their descendants are immigrating to the United States. We will examine the legal and social debates surrounding their labor in the 19th century, how they participated in the decolonization of the region, and how their migration to the United States complicates our understandings of ethnicity and race. Ultimately, through our comparative race approach, we will appreciate that the Caribbean is more than the Black Caribbean, it is also the Asian Caribbean.
                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                      GSWS 202-401 SPIRIT POSSESSION IN THE CARIBBEAN NWOKOCHA, EZIAKU T 0300PM-0600PM This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to possession experiences in Caribbean Religions. Through historical, ethnographic, autobiographical, literary and visual texts this course examines complex, gendered practices within the possession process, the vibrant spiritual energy that sustains communal connections during religious ceremonies, and the transnational imaginations that animate Caribbean religious practices in the Americas. Special attention will be given to Santeria, Candomble, Vodou, Myal, Palo Monte, and Revival Zion in the Americas. Possession is a process through which gender and sexuality can be performed, contesting national and regional discourses of sexuality, gender, and race in the Caribbean. Thematically, we will work through concepts of memory, community, adornment, ritual, borders, and the senses. We will investigate religious ritual practices to understand various religious worldviews that shape communities' religious and social lives.
                        GSWS 215-401 ASIAN AM GENDERSEXUALITY: ASIAN AMERICAN GENDER AND SEXUALITY PILLAI, RUPA TR 1030AM-1200PM This course explores the intersection of gender, sexuality, and race in Asian America. Through interdisciplinary and cultural texts, students will consider how Asian American gender and sexualities are constructed in relation to racism while learning theories on and methods to study gender, sex, and race. We will discuss masculinities, femininities, race-conscious feminisms, LGBTQ+ identities, interracial and intraracial relationships, and kinship structures.
                          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                          GSWS 220-401 ASIAN AMERICAN WOMEN: Asian American Women: Nation, Self, Identity ROY, RAILI W 0200PM-0500PM This course examines the literary constructions of Asian American Womens' identity in relation to the U.S. nation state. How have the figures of the tiger mother, the Asian nerd, the rice queen, the trafficked woman, the geisha, the war bride, emerged to represent Asian American women, and how have Asian American feminists responded to these problematic racial stereotypes? How does the scholarship on such racialized representations illuminate historical and contemporary configurations of gender, sexuality, race, class, nation, citizenship, migration, empire, war, neoliberalism and globalization as they relate to the lives of Asian American women? In exploring these questions, this course examines Asian American histories, bodies, identities, diasporic communities, representations, and politics through multi- and interdisciplinary approaches, including social science research, literature, popular representations, film, poetry and art.
                            CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                            GSWS 222-401 AFR WOMEN LIVES PAST/PRE: AFRICAN WOMEN LIVES PAST AND PRESENT BLAKELY, PAMELA T 0430PM-0730PM Restoring women to African history is a worthy goal, but easier said than done.The course examines scholarship over the past forty years that brings to light previously overlooked contributions African women have made to political struggle, religious change, culture preservation, and economic development from pre-colonial times to present. The course addresses basic questions about changing women's roles and human rights controversies associated with African women within the wider cultural and historical contexts in which their lives are lived. It also raises fundamental questions about sources, methodology, and representation, including the value of African women's oral and written narrative and cinema production as avenues to insider perspectives on African women's lives.
                              GSWS 234-401 GENDER RELIGION & CHINA CHENG, HSIAO-WEN R 0430PM-0730PM This course examines the interrelationship among "gender," "religion," and "China" as conceptual and historical categories. We ask, for example, how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in Chinese religious traditions, how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms, how religious women impact Chinese society and culture, and what the construction of "China" as a cultural identity and as a nation-state has to do with women, gender, and religion. We will also think about what assumptions we have when speaking of gender, religion, and China, and the infinite possibilities when we strive to think beyond. We will read three kinds of materials: (1) scholarship on gender and religion in historical and contemporary China as well as the Chinese-speaking world, (2) scholarship concerning theories and methodology of gender and religious studies not necessarily focused on China, and (3) historical record of religious women in English translation.
                                GSWS 257-401 CONTEMPOR FICT/FILM-JPAN KANO, AYAKO R 0130PM-0430PM This course will explore fiction and film in contemporary Japan, from 1945 to the present. Topics will include literary and cinematic representation of Japan s war experience and post-war reconstruction, negotiation with Japanese classics, confrontation with the state, and changing ideas of gender and sexuality. We will explore these and other questions by analyzing texts of various genres, including film and film scripts, novels, short stories, mangazines, and academic essays. Class sessions will combine lectures, discussion, audio-visual materials, and creative as well as analytical writing exercises. The course is taught in English, although Japanese materials will be made available upon request. No prior coursework in Japanese literature, culture, or film is required or expected; additional secondary materials will be available for students taking the course at the 600 level. Writers and film directors examined may include: Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobo, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Yoshimoto Banana, Ozu Yasujiro, Naruse Mikio, Kurosawa Akira, Imamura Shohei, Koreeda Hirokazu, and Beat Takeshi.
                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                  GSWS 258-401 WOMEN IN THE BIBLE CRANZ, ISABEL TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                    GSWS 277-401 GENDER, SEX & URBAN LIFE KNITTLE, DAVIS MW 0500PM-0630PM Is urban space gendered? Do we change how it is gendered as we move through it? Does it change us? This course explores gender and sexuality in the contemporary global city through the study of urban spaces. We will consider feminist, queer, and transgender theories of the city, as we investigate how practices of using and making space are gendered and sexualized. Each week of the course will be organized around a type of space, including subway, school, and birthing center, nightclub, suburb, and park. Assignments will include an auto-ethnography, a short critical essay, and a final assignment that asks you to propose an additional type of space in which to study the intersections of sex, gender, and the urban built environment. In each space, we will conduct an interdisciplinary exploration, drawing from sociology, anthropology, geography, city planning history, feminist and queer theory, as well as from fiction, poetry, music videos, photography, and documentary film.
                                      GSWS 294-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                        GSWS 331-401 WOMEN MAKING HISTORY: THE PENN MUSEUM AND THE CENTENNIAL 2020 SHARKEY, HEATHER T 0130PM-0430PM The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which declared that the right of citizens to vote "shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex". To mark this centennial - to both celebrate it and critically assess its impact on American society - we will investigate the history of women at the Penn Museum as archaeologists, ethnographers, epigraphers, philanthropists, and more. At the same time, we will examine material in the Penn Museum that women collected, donated, or studied. Our goal will be to produce original research that may contribute to future exhibits and publications as well as to broader public forums. Sponsored by the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, our seminar will focus heavily on western Asia, southeastern Europe, and North Africa - all zones that scholars have variously associated with the Near East or Middle East, and where the Penn Museum has been active since its foundation in 1887. To situate the Penn Museum and its collections within a global and comparative frame, we will also study select women who made major scholarly contributions to other parts of the world such as the Americas and Oceania. Among the figures we will study are Sarah Yorke Stevenson (Egypt), Katharine Woolley (Mesopotamia/Iraq), Harriet Boyd Hawes (Ottoman Crete and Greece), Florence Shotridge (Alaska), Zelia Nuttall (Mexico and Russia), and Tatiana Proskouriakoff (Guatemala). We will venture into many different kinds of history. In regional terms, our scope will be transnational and international: we will cover the United States and the Middle East in the wider world. In thematic and methodological terms, we will approach our subject through biography, oral history, and microhistory; material history and museum studies; cultural and intellectual history; women's and gender studies; and the history of academic disciplines, especially archaeology and anthropology.
                                          GSWS 340-401 MONEY, POWER, RESPECT: FUNDING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE LEE, ROZ R 0130PM-0430PM This course is about how to apply a race, gender and LGBTQ lens to support contemporary social justice movements in the U.S. and globally, including Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, transgender equality, and disability justice. We will explore intersectionality as a theoretical framework, and how it is practically applied to support social justice organizations and leaders, and fund social change. Over the course of the semester, Professor of Practice Roz Lee, a black lesbian feminist and lifelong racial, gender, LGBTQ and economic justice advocate, and who currently serves as Vice President of Strategy and Programs at the Ms. Foundation for Women, will be joined by movement leaders and philanthropy colleagues to discuss and analyze what's happening on the frontlines of movements for equity, justice and freedom.
                                            GSWS 344-401 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL GROWTH ZAMEL, PAMELA T 0500PM-0800PM Intellectual, emotional and behavioral development in the college years. Illustrative topics: developing intellectual and social competence; developing personal and career goals; managing interpersonal relationships; values and behavior. Recommended for submatriculation in Psychological Services Master's Degree program.
                                              GSWS 347-401 GENDER HIST & AMER FILM PEISS, KATHY T 0130PM-0430PM More than any other medium, the motion pictures fostered new ideals and images of modern womanhood and manhood in the United States. Throughout the twentieth century, gender representations on the screen bore a complex relationship to the social, economic, and political transformations marking the lives and consciousness of American men and women. This course explores the history of American gender through film. It treats the motion pictures as a primary source that, juxtaposed with other kinds of historical evidence, opens a window onto gendered work, leisure, sexuality, family life, and politics. We will view a wide range of Hollywood motion pictures since 1900, as well as films by blacklisted artists, feminists, and independent producers.
                                                GSWS 349-401 HIST OF SEXUALITY IN US PEISS, KATHY MW 1100AM-1200PM This course introduces students to a relatively new field of inquiry, the history of sexuality in the U.S. It explores the past to consider why sexuality has been so central to American identities, culture, and politics. Primary documents and other readings focus on the history of sexual ideology and regulation; popular culture and changing sexual practices; the emergence of distinct sexual identities and communities; the politics of sexuality; and the relationship between sexual and and other forms of social difference, such as gender, race, ethnicity, age, and class. Topics include many with continuing relevance to contemporary public debate: among them, sexual representation and censorship, sexual violence, adolescent sexuality, the politics of reproduction, gay and lesbian sexualities and sexually transmitted diseases.
                                                  SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                  GSWS 350-301 TRANS METHOD KNITTLE, DAVIS
                                                  KIM, AVA
                                                  MW 0200PM-0330PM What are the subjects of trans studies? What are the disciplinary and theoretical tools necessary to do trans studies? What does "trans" as a category afford us in looking at texts, people, systems, objects? To what extent is trans an identity? What might it mean to think of it as a methodology? This course aims to introduce students to "trans" as an analytic by drawing from queer studies, feminism, critical race theory, disability studies, environmental humanities, literary studies, and postcolonial critique, centering trans ways of thinking on scales from the body to the nation. As a relatively "new" field, trans studies contributes to feminist and queer theory but is uniquely engaged with social and health sciences, trans activist movements, and trans cultural production. In particular, Trans Method aims to extend trans beyond self-identified trans bodies and beyond the United States to consider the affordances of a global, polyscalar trans politics.
                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                    GSWS 392-401 QUEERING NORTH AFRICAN SUBJECTIVITIES GUEYDAN-TUREK, ALEXANDRA M 0200PM-0500PM This seminar will explore the ways in which literary and visual representations of sexual difference and gender roles disrupt the cultural imagination of everyday life in North Africa and its Diasporas. Special attention will be given to representations of Arab women and queer subjectivities as sites of resistance against dominant masculinity. We will analyze the ways in which representations of gender have allowed for a redeployment of power, a reconfiguration of politics of resistance, and the redrawing of longstanding images of Islam in France. Finally, we will question how creations that straddle competing cultural traditions, memories and material conditions can queer citizenship. Course taught in English.
                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                      GSWS 400-301 HONORS THESIS SEMINAR BEETHAM, GWENDOLYN TBA TBA- This course is for senior undergraduate GSWS majors who will be completing an honors thesis. The seminar helps students decide on the most appropriate methodologies to use and topics to include in their thesis. Other topics include thesis organization and drawing conclusions from primary and secondary sources of data.
                                                        GSWS 424-401 FEM POL FEM THEORY HIRSCHMANN, NANCY T 0130PM-0430PM This upper level undergraduate seminar will consider theoretical works that focus on six issues: currently planning on intersectionality, abortion, poverty, sexual harassment and assault, disability, and climate change.
                                                          GSWS 510-401 INNER OUTER SPACE TRAVEL WRITING: A CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP BRACHO, RICARDO R 0430PM-0730PM Inner Outer Space Travel Writing is a creative writing workshop focused on writing work within the science fiction/speculative fiction/alternative futurities, science/land/travel writing, and creative-critical nonfiction traditions. Students will work within a variety of genres, with an emphasis on the essay, the short story, screen/tele-play, play, blog and performance. Students will read recommended texts from within their particular interests, and the course will culminate in both a public performance and dissemination/publication via another media platform (zine, website, podcast, etc). All levels of experience, from none/first-time writer to published writers, are encouraged to register for the course.
                                                            GSWS 516-401 PUBLIC INTEREST WORKSHOP SUESS, GRETCHEN T 0130PM-0430PM This is a Public Interest Ethnography workshop (originally created by Peggy Reeves Sanday - Department of Anthropology) that incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to exploring social issues. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, the workshop is a response to Amy Gutmann's call for interdisciplinary cooperation across the University and to the Department of Anthropology's commitment to developing public interest research and practice as a disciplinary theme. Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on: 1) merging problem solving with theory and analysis in the interest of change motivated by a commitment to social justice, racial harmony, equality, and human rights; and 2) engaging in public debate on human issues to make research results accessible to a broader audience. The workshop brings in guest speakers and will incorporate original ethnographic research to merge theory with action. Students are encouraged to apply the framing model to a public interest research and action topic of their choice. This is an academically-based-community-service (ABCS) course that partners directly with Penn's Netter Center Community Partnerships.
                                                              AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                              GSWS 518-401 NURSING&GENDERING OF HEALTH CARE IN THE U.S. AND INTERNATIONALLY, 1860-2000 CONNOLLY, CYNTHIA W 0400PM-0700PM This course examines changing ideas about the nature of health and illness; changing forms of health care delivery; changing experiences of women as providers and patients; changing role expectations and realities for nurses; changing midwifery practice; and changing segmentation of the health care labor market by gender, class and race. It takes a gender perspective on all topics considered in the course. A comparative approach is used as national and international literature is considered. This focus is presented as one way of understanding the complex interrelationships among gender, class, and race in health care systems of the United States and countries abroad.
                                                                GSWS 527-401 MARKET WOMEN, MADAMES,MISTRESSES & MOTHER SUPERIOR JOHNSON, GRACE T 0130PM-0430PM PRING 2017: Market Women, Madames, Mistresses & Mother Superior studies ender, labor, sexuality, and race in the Caribbean. In our historical xamination of primary source documents alongside literature, and popular edia, we will question some of the iconic representations of Caribbean and atin American women in order to understand the meaning, purpose and usages hese women s bodies as objects of praise, possession, obsession and/or idicule by communities, governments and religions within and outside of th egion. Beginning in the late-18th century and ending with contemporary igration narratives, this course considers the relationship between slave ociety and colonial pasts on gender performance in the modern Caribbean, atin America, and their diasporas. In our interrogation of gender meanings, we will consider the ways Caribbean women and men define themselves and each other, while considering the intersections of color, class, religion and culture on the political and social realities of the Caribbean and the region. The geographic scope of the course will extend to Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Trinidad & Tobago. The following interrelated questions will anchor our exploration of each text: How have representations of Caribbean and Latin American women informed historical constructions and rhetoric of the region and national identity? What political and social strategies have Caribbean women and men used to define themselves in their countries and throughout the region? How do the history and contemporary conditions of a post-colonial nation impact the gender construction of Caribbean identities? What is the relationship between modern Caribbean gender identities and the regional racial and economic politics?
                                                                  GSWS 528-640 Witchcraft and Gender in the Early Modern World RABBERMAN, KRISTINE M 0630PM-0830PM From the 15th century through the 18th century, social tensions erupted in Europe and the Atlantic colonies in the witch craze, a period when intense cultural concern over witchcraft was expressed through religious treatises and sermons, popular literature such as pamphlets and broadsides, legal accusations, trials, and, in some cases, executions. Although the number of people executed during the witch-hunts is a matter of scholarly debate, their importance in understanding early modern beliefs and responses to social tensions is clear. In this class, we will explore historians' understandings of the causes underlying this cultural phenomenon. With special attention to gender, social position, and religious belief, we will join academic debates about the causes of these persecutions. We will also read some primary sources from the medieval through the early modern periods, including trial transcripts, sermons, and pamphlets. Were women the main target of witchcraft accusations and executions, and if so, was misogyny their most important cause? What role did sexual norms and beliefs have in the way that accusations were framed? Were there different patterns of accusations and executions across time and region, and if so, what social and cultural factors might explain them? In what ways were witchcraft accusations an effort to control marginal people in local communities, particularly in regard to gender, socio-economic position, and age? How might religious developments and conflicts have influenced elite and popular ideas about witchcraft? What challenges do historians face in analyzing primary sources about witchcraft and witchcraft trials? Through in class discussions and threaded discussion forums on primary sources, students will learn about the challenges involved in interpreting sources including treatises, trial transcripts, pamphlets, and images.
                                                                    ONLINE COURSE FEE $150
                                                                    GSWS 533-401 WOMEN MAKING HISTORY: THE PENN MUSEUM AND THE CENTENNIAL 2020 SHARKEY, HEATHER T 0130PM-0430PM The year 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which declared that the right of citizens to vote "shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex". To mark this centennial - to both celebrate it and critically assess its impact on American society - we will investigate the history of women at the Penn Museum as archaeologists, ethnographers, epigraphers, philanthropists, and more. At the same time, we will examine material in the Penn Museum that women collected, donated, or studied. Our goal will be to produce original research that may contribute to future exhibits and publications as well as to broader public forums. Sponsored by the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, our seminar will focus heavily on western Asia, southeastern Europe, and North Africa - all zones that scholars have variously associated with the Near East or Middle East, and where the Penn Museum has been active since its foundation in 1887. To situate the Penn Museum and its collections within a global and comparative frame, we will also study select women who made major scholarly contributions to other parts of the world such as the Americas and Oceania. Among the figures we will study are Sarah Yorke Stevenson (Egypt), Katharine Woolley (Mesopotamia/Iraq), Harriet Boyd Hawes (Ottoman Crete and Greece), Florence Shotridge (Alaska), Zelia Nuttall (Mexico and Russia), and Tatiana Proskouriakoff (Guatemala). We will venture into many different kinds of history. In regional terms, our scope will be transnational and international: we will cover the United States and the Middle East in the wider world. In thematic and methodological terms, we will approach our subject through biography, oral history, and microhistory; material history and museum studies; cultural and intellectual history; women's and gender studies; and the history of academic disciplines, especially archaeology and anthropology.
                                                                      GSWS 554-401 AFFECT THEORY & POWER SCHAEFER, DONOVAN W 0200PM-0500PM This seminar will examine contemporary affect theory and its relationship with Michel Foucault's theory of power. We will begin by mapping out Foucault's "analytics of power," from his early work on power knowledge to his late work on embodiment, desire, and the care of the self. We will then turn to affect theory, an approach which centralizes the non-rational, emotive force of power. No previous knowledge of theory is required.
                                                                        GSWS 555-401 HEALTH EDUCATION FOR INCARCERATED WOMEN BROWN, KATHLEEN W 0500PM-0800PM This elective course will afford students the opportunity to develop and implement health education workshops for incarcerated women in the Philadelphiajail system. Students will explore the social and historical framework and trends in the incarceration of women, as well as the needs of this population, and will identify specific areas that need to be addressed by particular disciplines or professions. Students will have direct contact with the jail system, its staff, and female inmates.
                                                                          AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                                                          GSWS 565-640 MORE HUMAN THAN HUMAN SADASHIGE, JACQUELINE R 0700PM-0900PM In early 2017, animal rights lawyer Steve Wise argued that two of his clients should be afforded the rights of "personhood." The clients in question were chimpanzees. This case suggests that "speciesism" might soon be met with the same degree of suspicion as sexism and racism. This course will explore how such a shift could come about and what it might signal. We will begin by examining the western foundations of binaries such as human-animal, male-female, and self-other. From here we will explore recent attempts to dismantle these constructs by ecofeminists and post-humanists. We will also look at how such categories have manifested in social movements and cultural artifacts. Finally, we will investigate how our beliefs about who "we" are and what "we" are not can affect everything from the foods we eat to where and how we vacation.
                                                                            ONLINE COURSE FEE $150; ONLINE COURSE ONLY
                                                                            GSWS 580-640 LEARNING FROM BALDWIN WATTERSON, KATHRYN R 0530PM-0810PM James Baldwin, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, spoke to the issues of his times as well as to our own. This class will examine the intellectual legacy that Baldwin left to present-day writers such as Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Thulani Davis, Caryl Phillips and others. We will spend time reading and discussing Baldwin's novels, short stories, plays and essays. In doing so, we will be considering the complex assumptions and negotiations that we make in our day-to-day lives around our identities and experiences built upon gender, sexual preference, the social-constructs called "race," and more. James Baldwin's life and work will be the touchstone that grounds our discussions. We will read Go Tell It on the Mountain, Another Country, The Fire Next Time, and Giovanni's Room and see films I Am Not Your Negro, The Price of the Ticket and The Murder of Emmett Till. Students will research subjects of their own choosing about Baldwin's life and art. For example, they may focus on the shaping influences of Pentecostalism; segregation; racism; homophobia; exile in Paris; the Civil Rights Movement; Black Power, Baldwin's faith, or his return to America.
                                                                              GSWS 581-401 ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN FEGLEY, SUZANNE R 0200PM-0400PM The course is intended for those who already have a foundation in the study of the psychology of women and want to expand their understanding of the provision of psychological services to include a contextual, feminist, and relational perspective. Theoretical and applied practices regarding women's mental health, issues of diversity, sexuality and relationships for women will be addressed. Prerequisite: Introduction to Psychology and an undergraduate course in the Psychology of Women or approval by professor.
                                                                                GSWS 582-401 GENDER,POWER&FEM THEORY HIRSCHMANN, NANCY M 0200PM-0500PM This seminar will examine the theme of power as it engages questions of sex andgender. Subsidiary themes that will be developed over the course of the semester include: the modernism/ postmodernism debate as it particularly relates to feminism; the intersectionality of race, gender, sexuality and class and how feminists can and do talk about "women"; the relevance of feminist theory to policy issues, and which theoretical approaches are the most appropriate or have the most powerful potential. The readings will start with "foundational" texts in feminist theory-- texts that anyone who wants to work in or teach feminist theory needs to have in their repertoire, they set out the background and history of contemporary feminist theory, and they operate from a variety of disciplinary frameworks. We then will move onto some newer scholarship and some more specific political issues and topics, depending on what students in the course are interested in studying. This course is open to undergraduates who have had some prior course work in feminist theory, gender and sexuality studies, and/or political theory, in consultation with the professor.
                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                  GSWS 587-401 RACE, NATION, EMPIRE THOMAS, DEBORAH W 0200PM-0500PM This graduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonial and post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially in relation to ideas about race and belonging. We will focus on how belonging and participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through a variety of institutional contexts. Finally, we will consider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.
                                                                                    GSWS 630-401 GENDER RELIGION & CHINA CHENG, HSIAO-WEN R 0430PM-0730PM This course examines gender in Chinese religious culture from ancient to contemporary times. We will explore topics including the Buddhist accommodation of Chinese family system, Chinese transformation of the bodhisattva Guanyin, female deities in Daoist and popular religious pantheons, writings about religious women, female ghosts and fox spirits in literary imagination and folk tales, and the significance of yin force in Chinese medicine and Daoist alchemy. Through the case of China, we will look at how gender plays critical and constitutive roles in religious traditions, and how religion can be used both to reinforce and to challenge gender norms.