New Coursera Delivers Positive Psychology to Students Around the Globe

The University of Pennsylvania, in collaboration with the online education platform Coursera, launched a specialization certificate program, “Foundations of Positive Psychology.”

The five-course series offers theories and research in the field of positive psychology, as well as opportunities for application. Martin Seligman, founding director of Penn’s Positive Psychology Center, along with colleagues from the center and from Fels Institute of Government, will lead the quintet.

“Positive psychology teaches learners that human beings can have more happiness now than they do, more engagement at work and with the people they love, more meaning in their lives and more positive accomplishment,” Seligman says.

Unlike single Coursera courses, specializations offer participants the opportunity to explore a new subject as well as earn a certificate. The online courses for “Foundations of Positive Psychology” include:

  • "Positive Psychology: Martin E.P. Seligman’s Visionary Science,” taught by Martin Seligman, Zellerbach Family Professor of Psychology and director, Positive Psychology Center
  • “Positive Psychology: Applications and Interventions,” taught by James Pawelski, director of education and senior scholar, Positive Psychology Center
  • “Positive Psychology: Character, Grit and Research Methods,” with Angela Duckworth, the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Psychology and scientific director, The Character Lab, as   well as Claire Robertson-Kraft, director of Fels’ ImpactED
  • “Positive Psychology: Resilience Skills,” taught by Karen Reivich, director of resilience and positive psychology training programs, Positive Psychology Center
  • “Positive Psychology Specialization Project,” with Seligman

Click here to read the full story.

Arts & Sciences News

Michael C. Horowitz Awarded Department of Defense Grant to Lead Team on Study of Autonomous Systems and AI

Michael C. Horowitz, Professor of Political Science, will oversee the study of autonomous systems and artificial intelligence.

View Article >
Earthquakes at the Nanoscale

In collaboration with Robert Carpick and David Goldsby, Tian, who graduated from Penn in 2017 with a doctorate in physics, recently published a paper in Physical Review Letters which attempts to tackle these devastating natural phenomena by investigating the laws of friction at the smallest possible scale, the nanoscale.

View Article >
Doris Wagner Named Robert I. Williams Term Professor

A leader in the fields of plant biology, chromatin modification, and epigenetics, Wagner’s research focuses on understanding at the molecular level the complex changes that occur when an organism switches developmental programs.

View Article >
Wrongful Convictions Reported for 6 Percent of Crimes

A study from Penn criminologists results in the first general estimate for the prison population as a whole.

View Article >
Race Has a Place in Human Genetics Research, Philosopher Argues

Penn philosopher Quayshawn Spencer says there is a racial classification that’s medically useful to reliably sample human genetic diversity.

View Article >
Exploring the Sounds of the Middle Ages

Assistant Professor of Music Mary Channen Caldwell's freshman seminar course, “Hearing (in) the Middle Ages,” explores a range of sounds heard throughout the medieval period, whether produced by people, instruments, bells, or animals.

View Article >